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Full text of "Annual report - Bureau of Reclamation"

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DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR 
FRANKLIN K. LANE, Secrbtary 



EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OP THE 

RECLAMATION SERVICE 

1918-1919 



ARTHUR P. DAVIS 
Director and Chief Engineer 




WA8HINOTON 

OOTBBNHBNT PBINTDIO OITICB 

M19 



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ABVVAl BEPOSTS OF THE BECLAMATIOV SERVICE. 

{Reports may be purchased from Saperintendent of Doeuments, Govenmient Printing Office, at the prices 

given.] 



1. June 17 to Dec. 1, 1902; 317 pages, 46 plates, 65 figures, case of drawings. 

Out of print. 
II. Through the field season of 1903; 550 pages, 49 plates, 56 figures. Cloth, 
85 cents. 

III. Through the field season of 1904; 653 pages, 59 plates, case of drawings. 

Cloth, $1.25. 

IV. Through the field season of 1905; 374 pages, 63 plates. Paper, 80 cents, 
y. Fiscal year 1905-6; 312 pages, 101 plates, 2 figures. Cloth, $1.25. 

VI. Fiscal year 1906-7; 287 pages. Paper, 25 cents. 
VII. Fiscal year 1907-8; 219 pages. Paper, 25 cents. 
VIII. Fiscal year 1908-9; 222 pages. Cloth, 40 cents; paper, 20 cents. 
IX. Fiscal year 1909-10; 329 pages. (Includes history of construction to date.) 

Cloth, 40 cents; paper, 25 cents. 
X. Fiscal year 1910-11; 290 pages. (Includes index Vols, I-X.) Cloth, 40 
cents; paper, 25 cents. 
XI. Fiscal year 1911-12; 310 pages, map. Cloth, 40 cents; paper, 25 cents. 
XII. Fiscal year 1912-13; 382 pages. Cloth, 40 cents; paper, 25 cents. 

XIII. Fiscal year 1913-14; 514 pages. Cloth, 45 cents; paper, 30 cents. 

XIV. Fiscal year 1914-15; 521 pages. Cloth, 45 cents; paper, 30 cents. 
XV. Fiscal year 1915-16; 808 pages. Cloth, 75 cents; paper, 60 cents. 

XVI. Fiscal year 1916-17; 598 pages. Cloth, 65 cents; paper, 50 cents. 
XVII. Fiscal year 1917-18; 552 pages. Cloth, 70 cents; paper, 50 cents. 
XVIII. Fiscal year 1918-19; 560 pages. Cloth, 80 cents; paper, 60 cents. 

A price list of publications Issued by the Reclamation Service can be obtained by application to the 
Director and Chief Engineer, United States Reclamation Service, Washington, D. G. 

The monthly bulletin of the aereice, the '* Reclamation Record," is issued about the first of each month. 
It contains usually 48 pages of general news and notes of interest about the projects. The subscription 
price to others than water users is 50 cent? per year, payable in advance. The publication is trw to water 



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EXCHANGE ^^ 

UNlVERSlTV^OF^f^ 

JUL 1 4 19» 



CONTENTS. 

Page 

Lettera of transmittal 6 

General discuadon 7 

Development of reclamation projecte 7 

Drainage 27 

Power developmen t 29 

Cement-testing work 38 

Purchase of material and supplies 39 

Freight, passenger, and express transportation 40 

Legal division 40 

Personnel 41 

Finances 42 

Discussion of projects 77 

Primary projects 77 

Secondary projects 383 

Indian projects 434 

Appendix 459 

Index 667 



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PRINCIPAL RECLAMATION SERVICE PROJECTS IN THE WESTERN UNITED 

STATES. ' 



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LETTERS OF TRANSMITTAL. 



Department of the Intekiob, 

WdshingtoUj December 5, 1919. 
Sir: In compliance with the provisions of section 2 of the act 
approved Jime 17, 1902, entitled "An act appropriating the receipts 
from the sale and disposal of public lands in certain States and Ter- 
ritories to the construction of irrigation works for the reclamation 
of arid lands," I have the honor to transmit the Eighteenth Annual 
Report of the Reclamation Service. 
Respectfully, 

Franklin K. Lane, Secretary. 

The Speaker of the House of Representatives. 



Department of the Interior, 
Unfted States Reclamation Service, 

WasMngtoUf D. (7., Septernber 10, 1919. 
Sir: Transmitted herewith is the Eighteenth Annual Report of 
the Reclamation Service, covering the work completed and in prog- 
ress during the fiscal vear ended June 30, 1919. 
Very respectfully, 

A. P. Davis, 
Director and Chief Engineer. 

The Secretary of the Interior. 

6 



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EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

RECLAMATION SERVICE. 



GENERAL DISCUSSION. 

DEVELOPMENT OF BECLAMATION PROJECTS. 

It is now 17 years since the passage of the reclamation act, durinff 
which the surveys, examinations, and construction therein authorized 
have proceeded under the provisions of that act and other acts amend- 
atory thereof and supplementary thereto. During the present year 
the service is in position to deliver water to about 1,600,000 acres of 
irrigable land, covered by crop census, of which about 1,120,000 
acres are now being irrigated. Besides this storage water is delivered 
from permanent reservoirs under special contracts to about 950,000 
acres more. The projects that have been undertaken have been 
planned to provide for an area of about 3,200,000 acres. This latter 
figure is tentative and subject to variation in accordance with the 
development of plans as the work progresses. 

DBOXJGHT CONDITIONS. 

A large portion of the arid region has been subject to severe drought 
for the past two years, leading to heavy losses on the part of those 
attemptmg to cultivate the soil without irrigation and leading to 
shortage of water supply in many irrigated regions. The reclamation 
projecte have been remarkably free from drought conditions, owing 
to the ample storage provisions usually made, the only notable 
exception bein§ a small project in nortKern Washington where the 
drought conditions are so intense that shortage has been suffered 
on a few thousand acres of irrigated land. The general requirement 
for irrigation, together with the striking success of agriculture under 
the Government projects, has ^eatly stimulated the demands for 
extension and completion of existing projects and the construction 
of new ones. 

INVESTIGATIONS OF NEW PBOJECTS. 

Investigations have indicated the feasibility of many large projects 
in various parts of the West. Many of these, however, require far 
more work m surveys and estimates to make them available for con- 
struction, and liberal appropriations have been made by various 
States for this purpose, frequently on the condition that an equal 
amoimt of money be advanced for the same purpose by the General 
Government. Tne major portion of the investigation work now 
carried on by this service is expended imder such contracts, the local 
contribution being made in some cases by the States and in others 
by voluntary associations. 



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EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 



Projects and extensions of projects investigated by the Reclamation Service in the Western 

States, 



State and project. 



Irrigable acreage. 



PubUc. 



Private. 



15,000 



10,000 



Arizona: 

YumaMesa 33,000 I 

SanOarloB «40,000 . 

California: I I 

Imperial Valley 400,000 1. 

PafoVerde 

Turlock-Modesto 

King's River 

Orkmd extension 

Iron Canyon 

Colorado: 

Grand Valley 

Grand Valley drainage — 

Orchard Mesa 

Uncompahgre 

Montesiuna 

San Luis Valley drainage. 
Idaho: 

HlUcrest 

Black Canyon 

Minidoka 

Hansen Butte 

Gem District I I 

LakeWalcott ' 2,480 

American Falls Reservoir. . . i » 33, 000 I 

Island Park Reservoir | < 10, 700 I 

Boise valley drainage I 

Payette Valley drainage — , 

Montana: i 

Milk River— | j 

Chinook Division. 



8,000 
30,000 



State. 



Mean i Mean 
alti- I rain 
tude. I fall. 



4,000 



3,000 
3,000 I 
95,500 I 



40,000 I. 
260,000 ,. 
400,000 . 

30,000 . 
250,000 1. 

15,000 L 
30,000 '. 
9,700 1. 
37,000 '. 
42,000 ' 
400,000 1. 

10,000 
35,000 

250 i 
22,000 '. 
37,000 1. 

"33,666" . 
5,000 . 
30,000 I 
10,000 



8,000 



1,000 
1,000 
0,750 



20 



10,000 . 
•25,000 I 
35,000 ' 



fi5,000 



3,500 i 
15,000 I 

* 125,000'. 



17,000 



Beaver Creek Division.. 

Cut Bank 

Sun River 

Bitter Root 

Nebraska: 

North Platte extensions 

Dawson County 

Farmers Canal 

Nevada: 

Upper Carson 

Pyramid Lake 

New Mexico: 

San Juan 

Middle Rio Grande drainage 
Oregon: 

Klamath pumping umts. 

Langell Valley 

TuleLake 

Rogue River 

Greater Umatilla j 3,500 { 

Owyhee , 6,000; 

Deschutes ' 

Lower Powder River 1 « 38,000 | 

Horsefly storage I 2,000 

South Dakota: 1 

Belle Fourche extension 

Tornilla-Fort Hancock unit 

Utah: 

Castle Peak 

Price River 

Dixie 

Utah Valley drainage 

"W'ashinRton: 1 

Yakima High line I 13,600 

Kittitas ' 5,000 I 

Wyoming: I 

Riverton 31,000 

Frarmie extension 36,000 

Heart Mountain unit I 34, 100 ' 

Willwoodunit 14,700 I 

Oregon Basin 68,000 1 



50,000 

*ii,666* 

30,000 
30,000 

88,000 
45,000 
50,000 

35,500 
1,000 



708 



100,000 

23,000 
17,000 



10,000 



Feet. 

180 

1,500 

—200 
250 
95 
225 
245 
230 

4,825 
4,650 
4,760 
5,500 
5,900 
7,600 

2,800 
2,400 
4,300 
4,150 
2,350 
4,400 
4,300 
0,250 
2,500 
2,250 



11,000 



70,000 ,. 
30,000 I. 
30,000 . 



30,000 : 
12,000 I 
'3,050 
17,000 
200,000 I 
25,000 I 
1,400 

22,300 

27,000 



2,200 
3,800 
4,100 
3,460 

4,100 
2,700 
2,600 

4,800 
4,000 

5,200 
4,800 

4,100 
4,200 
4,000 
1,600 

500 

2,200 
3,200 
3,000 
4,100 



3,917 2,800 

I 

3,500 



30,000 '. 

130,000 ' 
62,500 I 

40,000 , 

1,000 I 

1,600 

320 



0,000 
2,500 I 

13,000 I 

1,800 . 

3,200 I 

GOO 



5,200 
5,500 
3,000 
4,500 

1,000 
1,800 

6,100 
4,200 
4,900 
4,300 
4,600 



Jnchet. 
8 
10 

I' 

12 
10 
18 
17 

8 

8 
8 

»i 
12 
7 

13 
12 

\? 

12 
12i 



15 

in 



14 
13 
11 
11 

13 
22 
22 

12 
4 

8 

n 
12 

\? 
20, 
^ 
10 
9 

13 

m 

14i 



Probable 
oost.i 



S7,500.000 
13,600,000 

52,000,000 
5,000,000 
5,000,000 

12,000,000 
2,500,000 

35,000,000 

600,000 

1,200,000 

800,000 

500,000 

3,500,000 

10,000,000 




1 





1 







1,700,000 
1,200,000 
4,000,000 
1,500,000 

9,000,000 
2,500,000 
2,000,000 

2,000,000 
1,200,000 

(•) 
5,500,000 

1,200,000 
1,000,000 
1,250,000 
2,000,000 

3,100,000 

2,100,000 

12,000,000 

7,000,000 

300,000 

700,000 



12 

8i 
18 



8 I 1,200,000 



7,000,000 

(•) 

(«) 
1,000,000 



7 20,000,000 

9) 8,600,000 

19 6,000,000 

600,000 

6 3,300,000 

900,000 



(*) 



Readinen 

for 
construc- 
tion. 



Ready. 
Not ready. 

Ready. 
Not ready. 

Do. 

Do. 
Ready. 
Not ready. 

Ready. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Not ready. 
Ready. 

Do. 

Do. 
Not ready 
Ready. 

Do. 

Do. 
Not ready] 
Ready. 

Do. 

Do. 



Not ready. 
Ready. 
Not ready. 
Ready. 
Not ready. 

Ready. 
Not ready. 
Do. 

Ready. 
Do. 

Not ready. 
Ready. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Not ready. 

Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Do. 
Do. 
Do. 

Do. 
Ready. 

Do. 

Do. 
Not ready. 
Ready. 



Not ready. 



» These estimates must be considered as merely 
preliminary and subject to change. 
2 Indian, 

« In Fort Hall Indian Reservation. 
* In Targhee National Forest. 



6 In Navajo Indian Reservation. 

• No estimate. 

» Railroad. 

" 17,000 withdrawn under Carey Act. 



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DEVELOPMENT OF EBCLAMATION PROJECTS. 9 

HtBIGABLB AND ntBIGATED ACBEAGE. 

The statistics of irrigation show that on the projects ol the Rec- 
lamation Service there are about 600,000 acres of laiid to which the 
service is readj; to deliver water but which are not irrigated. This 
immediately raises the query as to why this is so, and suggests that 
further development be delayed. As a matter of fact, such a con- 
clusion would be entirely imwarranted. 

The most important item in the acreage not irrigated consists of 
the unirrigated portions of farms that are occupied and cultivated 
but have not been wholly brought imder cultivation. The reduction 
of the average farm in the aria region to actual cultivation by the 
occupier requires clearing, leveling, and ditching, and is a slow process 
with the average settler who has limited capital and is probaoly de- 
pending upon his own efforts and his own teams to accomplish results. 
The facts are that on the average three-fourths of each occupied 
farm is actually under irrigation, and this is a very good showing 
imder the circumstances. Many old settled communities have done 
little better. 

The next item of importance is the acreage represented by hold- 
ings of nonresidents or of persons owning more than 160 acres and 
who are imable to purchase water right for the excess holding. The 
law prohibits the sale of water rights to nonresidents and to hold- 
ings greater than 160 acres. Gradually the excess holdings are being 
disposed of to new settlers, and the nonresidents are either selling 
to settlers or are themsdves gradually occupying the lands and plac- 
ing them imder cultivation. 

A third class is composed of the public lands that are open to 
entry and have not been filed upon. These are comparatively few, 
are distributed on several of the public-land projects, and are as a 
rule lands but recently opened to settlement or are of inferior quality, 
80 that while they may be eventually taken, this is not done until 
after the better opportunities are exhausted. Roughly speaking, the 
area covered by crop census to which we can deliver water may be 
divided about as follows: 



Occupied lanns partly cultivated., 
NoDiesidexit and excess holdings . . 
Unentered public lands 



Acres. 



1,312,000 
240,000 
4S,000 



Percent. 



82 
15 
3 



ADVANTAGES OF ntBIGATION FABMING. 

Agriculture in the arid region where irrigation is feasible has several 
important advantages over that in the humid region. The soils of 
the arid region by the nature of the case have generally not been 
leached of tneir mmeral plant foods as have those in the humid region, 
and they are therefore much richer in this respect on the average 
and are seldom or never acid, as are soils in the numid region. This 
quality has the disadvantage at times of leaving the arid lands 
cnarged with hm-tful alkalies which seldom remam in the himiid 
region on account of their solubility, but where the injurious salts 
do not predominate the general principle of abundance of mineral 
plant food obtains and constitutes a distinct advantage for soils of 
the arid region over those of humid regions. 



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10 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

There is much advantage in being able to apply water to growing 
crops at just the time and in just tne quantity needed and to with- 
hold it at will. Where the water supply is ample this constitutes a 
very important advantage in arid regions. 

Another striking advantage is the preponderance of clear days in 
an arid region, where the absence of rainy and cloudy weather affords 
a much larger percentage of sunshine than is found in humid regions. 
As sunlight is one of the most important essentials of healthy plant 
growth, this advantage is quite important. 

Resulting from these advantages, it appears that the average 
gross product of agricultural crops on reclamation projects is just 
about double the average yield from nonirrigated lands in the coun- 
try at large. The larger product obtainable per acre from irrigated 
lands justifies and permits a more careful and intensive cultivation, 
which with a favorable climate and controllable water supply, yields 
more certain results than the same care in the humid region. 

This means that as much product can be obtained from a 40-acre 
tract under irrigation as from the average 80-acre tract in the humid 
region. This of course requires more labor per acre, but much less 
labor in proportion to product. It permits and encourages inten- 
sive cultivation and smaller holdings and consec[uent greater cen- 
tralization of population. The resmt is that the isolation of country 
life is to a large extent eliminated, as the irrigating farmer will 
have fully twice as many neighbors within a given radius as his 
prototype in the humid region. The social advantages thus ob- 
tained react upon the character of the people and of the communi- 
ties and other conditions characteristic of irrigated regions to a 
similar effect. 

Cooperation with his neighbors is forced upon the irrigator because 
it is usually impracticable for him to irrigate his land without such 
cooperation, the feasible irrigation projects usually being in tracts of 
many thousands of acres accommodating thousands of families and 
giving rise to towns, villages, and characteristic civilizations of their 
own. This condition stimulates the civic conscience and attention 
to public affairs of common interest, so that the local governments 
that grow up under such conditions are usually of a superior order 
and controlled by a superior intelligence on the part of the population 
living thereunder. 

IRRIGATION PROGRESS. 

During the past year the operation of the Government under the 
various reclamation laws has continued to develop the resources of 
the projects undertaken, as shown by the gradual increase in the area 
for which the service can supply water, the increase in areas actually 
irrigated and cropped, and tne increase in the value of crop produced. 
This progressive increase is shown in the following table, wnich gives 
statistics only for those areas covered by crop census, excluding 
practically all those additional areas which are served from the worl^ 
of the Reclamation Service under Warren Act contracts and from 
which crop statistics were not obtainable. It is estimated that, in- 
cluding these areas, the crop value in 1918 probably amounted to 
$100,000,000 or over. 



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DEVELOPMENT OF RECLAMATION PROJECTS. 



11 



Year. 



1 Irrigable 
I acreage. 



1913 ' 1,181,362 

1914 1 1,240,875 

1915 , 1,330,222 

1916 1 1,405,452 

1917 1 1,602,468 

1918 1 1,60' '^' 



Irrigated 
acreage 


Cropped 
acreage. 


Crop 
value. 


094,142 
761,271 
814,906 
922,821 
1,026,663 
1,119,566 


637,227 
703,424 
757,613 
858,291 
966,784 
1,051,193 


$15,676,411 
16,475,517 
18,164,452 
32,815,972 
56,462,313 
66,821,396 



The statistics given in the above table do not, however, tell the 
whole story. The easy terms of repayment granted by the Govern- 
ment and the high prices received lor their products have combined 
with the other favorable conditions and with the industry of the 
people to produce a condition of prosperity beyond the indications of 
the bare statistics. 

CONTBACTS TTNDBB WABBBN ACT. 

[Act of Feb. 21, 1911, 36 Stat., 925.] 
BOISE PROJECT, IDAHO. 



Name of contractor. 



Boise-Payette Lumber Co 

¥armen* Cooperative Ditch Co 

Farmers' Union Ditch Co 

Black Canyon Irrigation District 

Nampa & Meridian Irrigation District 

New York Canal Co. (Ltd.) 

Pioneer Irrigation District 

PioDeer IrrigaUtm District and Black Canvon Irrigation District. 
Riverside Irrigation District and Big Bend Irrigation District. . . . 

SeUlers' Irrigation District 

Do 



Totol. 



Date of 
contract. 



June 
Dec. 
Aug. 
Jon. 
June 
July 
Feb. 
May 
Feb. 
Feb. 
Feb. 



15,1918 

3. 1917 

13. 1917 

2. 1918 
1,1915 
1,J918 

27,1913 
28,1919 

15. 1918 
9,1918 

18,1919 



Area in 
acres. 



100.16 
15,500 
8,100 
39,000 
24,557 
21,498 
34,400 
I 6,000 
14,385 
12,000 
420 



176.960.16 



Amount 

of 
water in 
acre-feet. 



1 Canal capacity | inch per acre. > Indeterminate. 

MINIDOKA PROJECT, IDAHO-JACKBON LAKE ENLARGEMENT UNIT. 



250 
1,000 
2,426 

0) 
2,934 

(*) 

17,700 

43,000 
1,000 
1,500 

(>) 



Aberdeen-Springfield Canal Co 

American mis Canal Securities Co 

ArmsbergeTLJ. R , 

Bradbury, W. A., and J. C. McMullcn 

Burgess Canal & Irrigating Co , 

Cooant Creek Canal Co. (Ltd.) 

Dewey Canal Co 

Enterprise Canal Co. (Ltd.) 

Enterprise Irrigation IMstrict 

F&rmers' Friend Canal Co. (Ltd.) 

Earmers' Friend Irrigation Co 

Earmers' Own Ditch Co. (Ltd.) 

Harrison Canal & Irrigat ion Co 

Independent Canal Co. (Ltd.) 

Kuhn Irrigation & Canal Co. and Twin Falls Canal Co.. 

Last Chance Canal Co. (Ltd.) 

Lenroot Canal Co. (Ltd.) 

Lowder Slough Canal Co. (Ltd.) 

Lyle.W.S 

Martin Canal Co. 



New Sweden Irrijation District., 

Toplar Irrigation District 

Peoples' Canal & Irrigation Co 

Rudy Irrigation Canal Co 

Snake River Valley Irrigation District. 
Snnnydelllrrigation District 



Total. 



June 4,1917 
Dec. 28,1917 
June 1, 1918 
Apr. 23,1917 
Mar. 28,1917 
Aug. 5, 1918 
Aug. 4,1918 
Apr. 16,1917 
Aug. 2, 1918 
Aug. 5,1918 
June 18,1917 
Aug. 2,1918 
Apr. 5, 1917 
Aug. 3,1918 
Feb. 25,1913 
Aug. 4, 1918 
July 27,1917 
Apr. 15,1^17 

do 

do 

June 29,1917 
May 1,1917 
Apr. 15,1917 

do 

Aug. 11,1917 
June 8,1917 



65,000 
7,000 



280 
23,000 



7,000 



10,000 

13,666* 

416,066' 



4,000 

1,300 
160 

1,500 
27,000 

1,200 
20,000 

8,000 
24,000 

4,400 



626,840 



40,000 
2,685 

300 

200 
5,120 

240 

240 
6,100 
2,400 

800 
2,000 

240 

5,000 

2,400 

400,000 

480 
3,000 
1,040 

165 
1,500 
6,000 
1,200 
8,000 
2,000 
15,000 
4,000 



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12 



EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL. REPORT OF REOLAMIATION SERVICE. 



NORTH PLATTE PROJECT, NEBRA8KA-WY0MIN0. 



Name of contractor. 



Date of 
contract. 



Area in 



Amount 

'• of 



acr»4eet. 



July 3,1918 
July 14.1913 
Mar. 6,1913 
do. 



Boerllne Irrigation Canal Co 

Brown's Creek Irrigation District 

Central Irrigation District 

Chimney Rock Irrigation District 

Oering Irrigation District I Jan. 17,1913 

Tri-State Land Co. (Farmers' Inigation District) Aug. 20,1912 

Bridgeport Irrigation District I Juno 14, 1916 

Qoshen Land Co. (and Lingle Water Users' Association) i July 1 , 1915 

Pleasant Valley Lateral Association | June 

Lincoln Land Co , Apr. 

Dawson County Irrigation Co.> Mar. 



Total. 



16,1915 
17,1917 
19,1919 



i 7,784 

1,501 

3,916 
14,243 
60,000 
17,434 
I 9,800 

4,000 

964 

I 

'120,746 



1 Temporary contract for season of 1919 only. 
BELLE FOURCHE PROJECT, SOUTH DAKOTA. 

Beyer Aune and Bessie Hull Aune I May 2,1918' 36.8 



1,630 
19>900 

4,050 
10,300 
35,500 
180,000 
37,478 
32,853 
13,522 

1,941 

5,000 



STRAWBERRY VALLEY PROJECT, UTAH. 



P. E. Whiting I June 8,1916 

John I. Hayes do. 



William A. Pace 

Soldier Fork Unit 

Do 

Clinton Unit 

Payson City 

Spanish Fork City, No. 1656. . . 
Spanish Fork City. No. 1710. .. 
Springville Irrigation District.. 
Mapleton Irrigation District. . . 

Do 



Total. 



Sept. 26, 1916 
Dec. 15,1916 
July 16,1918 
June 1,1916 
Jan. 8, 1917 
Apr. 28,1917 
Aug. 21,1918 
Dec 29,1917 
Jan. 2, 1918 
Apr. 5,1919 



40 I 
20 I 

120 I 

130 

55 

1,458.41 

3,000 
4,000 
1,000 



9,823.41 



» City lots. 
YAKIMA PROJECT, WASHINGTON. 



Sunnyside Irrigation District Oct. 

Snipes Mountain Irrigation District Nov. 

Outlook Irrigation District Nov. 

Union Gap Irrigation Dbtrict Mar. 

Grandview Irrigation District Aug. 

Prosser Irrigation District I Dec. 

W. O. Bradbury i May 

Tavlor & Robar Nov. 

Herbert Bostock July 

C. S. Mead May 

H. L. Stonebraker Nov. 



40 
20 
50 

67.5 
56 

700.9 

200 

400 

40 

2,400 

3,600 

1,108 



6,1914 


4,630 1 


16, 1914 


1,915 


23, 1914 


4,226 


2,1916 


1,500 


4,1916 


3,994 


1,1917 


2,150 


22, 1916 


18 


24, 1916 


30 


19, 1917 


30 


23, 1918 


50 


22, 1918 


40 



18,520 
6,266.25 
2,928.50 
4,275 
10,983.50 
6,450 
54 
90 
90 
76 
120 




NO NEW PROJECTS XJNDEBTAK^EN. 

No new projects have been undertaken within the past year, as 
there have oeen no funds available for this purpose. The gradual 
decline in the receipts from the sales of public lands, due largely to 
the wholesale disposal of these lands under the operation of the 640- 
acre homestead act, has naturally greatly restricted the operations 
under the reclamation act. The small payments provided by law 



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DEVELOPMENT OF BBCLAMATION PlBtOJEOTS. 13 

from the irrigated lands have kept the returns from the constructed 
projects to a low point. It is now necessary, under the provisions of 
existing law, to set aside $1,000,000 per annum from tnese receipts 
to repay the advances to the reclamation fund which were provided 
by the act of 1910, known as the **bond loan/' It has been possible 
on this account only slightly to extend the irrigated area by some 
extension of canal sjstems and to take care of water-logged conditions 
on some of the projects. 

SEEPAGB AND DRAINAGE. 

The industry of irrigation by which water is applied to the surface 
of the soil for the growing of crops is necessarily attended by a con- 
siderable escape of such water to the subsoil, where in most cases it 
joins ground water, and this gradually rises. Such a condition is of 
course aggravated and expemted by wasteful applications of water, 
and this is very diflScult to avoid if the soils are open and porous, but 
even in case of tight soils and a reasonably economical use of water 
some rise of ground water is likely to occur and very few irrigated 
regions of magnitude exist in the world which have not attached to 
them an important drainage problem. Accordingly, during the last 
few years one of the largest and most important activities of the 
Reclamation Service has been the provision of suitable drainage works 
on the various projects where these are required. In some cases 
these have been practically completed and are serving their purpose 
well, but in the majority of cases they are still in progress ana the 
available construction funds are not suflBcient to carrv this on with 
the requisite speed and economy. Hence considerable areas which 
ought to be returning construction charges are held back for this 
reason, as it is of course impossible to collect the charges from 
unproductive land. 

BECLAMATION PBOJECT OPEBATIONS. 

The Salt River project in Arizona is being operated by the local 
organization of water users imder a contract by which the Secretary 
of the Interior turned over the works and the income of the large 
power plants constructed in connection with the project. It is in a 
prosperous condition, and the income from power a good deal more 
than pays the construction charges. The Government connection 
with this project is confined to occasional inspection and supervision, 
as provided in the contract. The ground water is rising on this 
project and will require early attention in order to prevent injury to a 
considerable area of land. This has been investigated by the water 
users' association, which is alive to the problem and will doubtless 
take necessary action. 

On the Yuma project, Arizona-California, the Yuma Valley, which 
lies in Arizona, has been placed under public notice, but the payments 
are being contested by the water users* association. This contest 
came to trial in the month of April and the case is now held under 
advisement by the court. The Yuma Valley is exceedingly pros- 
perous, having, with one exception, the highest gross yield per acre 
of any of the projects of the Reclamation Service. This for the year 
1918 was over $113 per acrp, exclusive of live-stock increase. An- 



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14 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL. REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

nouncement has been made of the sale of a portion of the lands on 
the Yuma Mesa, which will be irrigated with water pumped from the 
main canal south of the city of Yuma under the provisions of a special 
act of Congress. A contract has been executed with the Imperial 
irrigation district to connect its system with Laguna Dam and pro- 
vide better security for its water supply. 

The Orland project in California is regarded as the first unit of a 
comprehensive project for the development of the Sacrainento Valley. 
It, however, stands alone as a self-supporting project with an ample 
water supply from Stony Creek, a tributary of Sacramento River 
and has been practically completed. Public notice on this project 
was issued in 1916 and all payments are made promptly when tney 
fall due by the association as a whole. Thus, all the annoyance, 
expense, and risk of delinquency are voluntarily shoiddered by tide 
water users' association, wnich has shown a commendable spirit of 
cooperation from the first. The project is prosperous and constantly 
growing in development. The only construction work in prowess is 
a small amount of permanent canal lining which was provided for in 
the current public notice and which is necessary for checking the 
seepage from the canals constructed in coarse material. 

The Grand Valley project in Colorado is delivering water to a por- 
tion of the land wnich nas been opened to entry and occupied by 
settlers. The agricultural operations are gradually extending and 
results are encouraging. The physical conditions in this valley are 
difficult on account of the seamy shale which occurs on the canal 
system and which has required a large amount of maintenance and 
betterment work to render the canals tight. Aside from these diffi- 
culties the works are operating in a very satisfactory manner. 

The Uncompah^e project, Colorado, is being operated by the 
United States imder contract with the water users' association upon 
the payment of the cost of such operation by the association. The 
contract provides that the operation may be turned over to the water 
users' association whenever they so elect, and this is being consum- 
mated. The existing contract provides for the operation and cost 
for a period of five years, at the end of which period the project is 
to be opened imder public notice unless further extension is made by 
the Secretary of the Interior. At that time, according to the con- 
tract, the construction repayments will begin. The construction of 
the project is completed so far as the plans of the Government have 
been made, but the distribution svstems, which remain in the hands 
of the irrigators, are very unsatisfactory and should be enlarged and 
improved. The cultivation of the lanas is gradually extending and 
slow improvement is being made in the use of water which is very 
wastefufiy applied to the lands. Efforts are being made to introduce 
the rotation system and to charge for water on an acre-foot basis, 
which will be necessary before good practice in the economy of water 
can be hoped for. The excessive application of water is manifested 
by a rising water table and the destruction of the fertility of some of 
the land. Agriculture in general is successful, and the settlers are 
prosperous. 

The Boise project in Idaho includes the Arrowrock and Deer Flat 
Reservoirs which have been completed, and a canal system which 
now delivers water to the main body of the project. Contemplated 
extensions will be made gradually to conform to better practices 



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DEVELOPMENT OF KECIAMATION PROJECTS. 15 

regarding the use of water which is sufficient for irrigating about 
40,000 additional acres of land if used with reasonable economy. 
Public notice was issued in 1917 announcing the chaises on the com- 
pleted portion of the project, but the water users brought suit to 
escape a portion of the repayment and this has been tried in the 
United States court. A preliminary opinion has been handed down 
by the court, which holds that the full cost of the project must be 
paid by the beneficiaries, but withholds decision upon several points 
of detail. 

In addition to the main project, the United States, under 11 special 
contracts, delivers storage water to about 150,000 acres of lands that 
are served by independent systems. The current year has been one 
of exceptional drouth and it was preceded also by a very dry year. 
It is the general opinion, as expressed by the water users and the 
local press that the benefits the past season from the storage works 
constructed by the Government have been greater than me total 
cost of those works in the increased product upon the lands served 
by stored water which would have been without water except for 
these works. The project as a whole is very productive and successfid. 

The Minidoka project in Idaho as originally planned has been 
completed, but several extensions are possible and desirable. The 
project is in two portions — that which is served with irrigation water 
by gravity has been formed into an irrigation district which operates 
the canal system serving it under contract with the United States; 
the pumping unit on the south side of the river is operated by the 
Umted States. The results of irrigation in this region are very 
strikingand exceptionally successful. 

The Huntley project in Montana is practically completed and is 
one of the most successful and thickly settled projects of the service. 
Drainage work is in progress and some enla^ement of a portion of 
the deBvery system is ^o being made. Construction payments 
upon the lands served are being regularly made. 

In the Milk River Valley, Mont., water is being delivered through 
a canal leading from St. Mary River which diverts that river just 
below St. Mary Lake. By a treaty arrangement with Canada the 
waters of the St. Mary are divided on an agreed basis and this water 
is being used very completely the present year. The demand for 
irrigation water, on account of the excessive dryness, is greater than 
ever before. The water is all used on a rental basis, partly through 
the works of the service and partly delivered to canal systems of 
private or cooperative companies. 

On the Sun Kiver project, Montana, the original unit on the south 
side of Sun River is oeing operated as usual. On the north side of 
the river where many of the settlers were attempting to secure title 
to their homesteads without the liability for irrigation water which 
is included in their filing papers, a series of three dry years in succes- 
sion has shown that dry farming is not profitable and has revived 
the demand for irrigation water. Difficulties with the canal systepas 
have been encountered on accoimt of tide unfavorable material with 
which they were constructed, but it is possible this year to deliver 
water to about 25,000 acres and a considerable portion of this is 
being served on a rental basis. A beet-sugar factory would be profit- 
able m this region. 



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18 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPOBT OF BEOLAMATION SEBYICOI. 

The Reclamation Service experienced serious water shortage on 
one project — the Okanogan project in northern Washington — in 
1918, and while there was some snortage also in 1919, it was not so 

E'eat. Pumping plants were installed at Salmon Lake and Duck 
ake to supplement the storage reservoirs which did not entirely 
fill. The additional pumping capacity and the enlargement of the 
reservoir hold-over capacity are the remedies being carried out. 

The Yakima project in Washington includes a large system of 
storage reservoirs and two canal systems known as the Simnyside 
unit and the Tieton unit. The project as a whole is very productive 
and prosperous and strong pressure is being made to secure the con- 
struction of more storage, the extension of existing canal systems, 
and the construction of new canals from the Yakima River and its 
tributaries. The excellent results obtained show that this would be 
a wise development. The Yakima project as a whole is one of the 
foremost in general prosperity and in returning the cost of this con- 
struction. 

The Shoshone project in Wyoming is being gradually extended by 
additions to the canal and lateral systems on the north side of the 
Shoshone River. The drainage system which has been largely com- 
pleted and has been very successful, is also being extended imder 
contract with the water users in accordance with law. The lands are 
very productive and the project very prosperous. Preparations are 
being made for the construction of an adoitional unit on the south 
side of the Shoshone River for which ample storage capacity has 
been provided in the Shoshone Reservoir. 

The value of the agricultural products exclusive of live stock pro- 
duced by the Government reclamation projects during the season of 
1918, amounting to nearly $67,000,000, has been over naif of the net 
cost of construction of dl of the projects during the last 17 years. 
On some of the projects the 1918 production has exceeded the 
total construction cost, and even better results are anticipated for 
the current agricultural year. The results in the extension of agri- 
culture and of homemaking have justified the expectations of the 
advocates of this activity and argue strongly for its extension, for 
which there is great and growing demand. 

SUHMABY OF CONSTBTTCTION BBSXTLTS. 

The following table gives in concise form a review of the work done 
by the Service to June 30, 1919. It is especiallv noteworthy that 
in spite of adverse labor conditions the amount oi excavation totaled 
more than 14,000,000 cubic yards, and that 575 miles of canals and 
drains were constructed. 



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DEVELOPMENT OF BBOIAMATION PBOJEOTS. 
Summary of conatructUm remUt, June SO^ 1919. 



19 



Items. 



To June 30, 1019. 



To Jtme 30, 1018. 



Increase. 



LANDS. 

Estimated area of projects on com- 
pletion 

Reservoir capacity available (orig- 
inal) , 

CANALS, DITCHES, AND DRAINS. 

Canals over 800 second-feet capacity . 
OanalsBOl to 800 second-feet capacity. 
Canals 50 to 300 seoond-lieet cai>acity. 
Canals less than BO second-feet ca- 
PJMdty 

Total canals 

Waste-water ditches , 

Drains, open , 

Drains, closed 

Total 

Grand total , 

TUNNELS. 

Number 

Length (feet) 

STOEAOB AND DTTEBSION DAMS. 

Mascmry 

Earth 

Rock fill and crib 

Total 

DIKXS AND LEVZBS. 

Length and volnme 

CANAL STBUCTURES. 

Costing over 12,000 

Costing 1000 to 12,000 

Costing $100 to SSdO..: 

Costing less than $100 

Total 

Grand total 

BBIDOES. 

Steel 

Combination , 

Wood 

Concrete , 

TotaU 

CULVERTS. 

Concrete 

|£g^ 

Terracotta '..'.'.',..'/.'...[.',[ 

Wood 

Total 

PIPE. 

Concrete , 

Metal 

Terra ootta<tfle) 

Wood , 

Total , 



Acres. 
3,212,006 



Farmt. 
67,447 



Acrti. 
3,081,480 



Firms. 
02,477 



Acrts. 
130,528 



Fiarfus, 
4,970 



Acre-feet. 

9,430,910 

Miles. 

438 

670 

1,019 

7,807 



Acre-feet. 

9,197,460 

Miles. 

420 

667 

1,807 

7,544 



Acre-feet. ' 

238,460 

MUes. 

18 

8 

112 

268 



10,834 I 



666 
643 
172 



1,480 



12,314 

95 
143,847 

Cubic yards. 

2,067,991 
10,220,671 
1,203,386 



13,512,048 



Feet. 
513,989 

Concrete. 



1,044 
2,100 
9,896 
19,682 



32,722 



CtMc yards. 
4,517,664 



Wood. 



201 

528 
5,870 
57,824 



64,423 



97,145 



Number. 



106 

414 

6,134 

346 



7,000 



1,030 
1,560 
1,505 
4,049 



9,044 



Length. 



Feet. 

8,579 
12,542 
135, 218 

4,399 



160,738 



95,088 
54,929 
64,096 
96,492 



310,605 



Linear/eet. 

628,572 

247,136 

1,270,375 

495,432 



10,438 



495 
643 
163 



396 
170 



1,301 



9 
"l79 



11,739 

94 
142,237 

Cubic yards. 

2,064,187 
9,908,351 
1,185,529 



676 

1 
1,610 

Cubic yards. 

3,804 

222,890 

17,857 



13,268,067 



243,981 



Feet. 
504,426 



Concrete. 



058 
2,011 
9,177 
16,386 



CvMe yards. 
4,470,702 



FeeL 
9,563 



Wood. 



Concrete. 



184 

478 

5,011 

55,003 



86 

89 

719 

3,296 



60,676 



4,190 



Cubfcyttris, 



Wood. 



17 

50 

869 

2,821 



3,747 



89,206 



7,037 



Number. 



105 

414 

5,500 

342 



6,361 



1,832 
1,433 
1,096 
3,164 



Length. Number, 



Feet. 

8,466 
12,542 
117,606 

4,254 



142,868 



88,719 
52,005 
50,947 
72.213 



7,525 



263,884 



Linearfeet. 

596,250 

230,616 

1,166,337 

471,236 



2,641,615 



2,473,430 



684 
4 



680 



98 
127 
409 



1,519 



Length. 



Feet. 



113 



17,612 
145 



17,870 



6,360 
2,024 
13,140 
24,270 



46,721 



Ltnearfeet. 

32,322 

7,620 

104,038 

24,106 



168,076 



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20 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 
Summary of construction results^ June SO, 1919 — Continued. 



Items. 


To Juno 30, 1919. 


To June 30, 1918. 


Increase. 




Numl)er. 


Length. 


Number. 


Length. 


Numlier; 


Lonixth. 


FLUMKS. 

(Toncrete 


85 

960 

2,141 


Feet. 
27,668 
159,072 
449,569 


80 


Feet. 

0.1 <407 


5 
206 
213 


Feet. 
7,231 
8,273 
15.622 


Metal 


756 150,799 
1,928 1 433.947 


Wood 




Total 


3.186 


636,299 


2 763 1 '^'^ ^"^ 


423 


31.136 






Wood. 


CANALS UNEO. 

LenfTth miles. . 


Concrete. 


Wood. 


Concrete. 


Concrete. 


Wood. 


307. 57 


4.10 


307.30 1 4.10 


0.27 










Total 


311.67 


311.40 


0.27 




BUILDINGS. 

Offices 


Xumber. 

97 

636 
29 
89 

523 


Number. 

83 
590 
26 
69 
495 


Number. 

14 




46 


Power plants 


3 
20 


Pumping stations 


Barns, storehouses, etc 


28 




Total 


1,374 


1.263 


111 






Number. 

448 


Depth. 


Number. 


Depth. 


Number. 


Depth. 


Number and depth 


47.879 


416 


3."). 411 


32 


12.468 


COMMUNICATIONS. 

Roads., 


M 


ties. 

970 


Miles. 

955 

83 

2.934 

450 


Mi.'cs. 

15 


Railroads 


83 

3.126 

615 




Telephone lines 


192 




165 






Total 


4.794 


4,422 


372 






POWER DEVELOPED. 

Water and steam horsepower. . 

EXCAVATION. 

Class 1, earth 


59.633 

Cubic wards. 

154,473,487 
9,913,065 
8.409.722 


48,093 

Cubic yards. 

141.015.518 
9.569.457 
8. 199, 793 


11.540 

Cubic yardi. 

13.457.969 


Class 2, indurated material 


343.608 


Class 3, rock 


209.929 






Total 


172.796.274 


158.784.768 


14.011.506 






Riprap cubic yards.. 

Paving square yards.. 

Concrete cubic yards.. 

Cement barrels.. 


1,892.728 

819,408 

3,023,446 

2.971,330 


1.735.893 

807.485 

2.976,448 

2.919.107 


156.835 
11.923 
46.998 
52.223 



SETTI^BMENT. 

Owing to the improved financial condition of the project farmers, 
due to good crops and war prices, public interest in CSrovernment 
irrigated lands has become very keen, and the inquiries concerning 
future public openings showed a marked increase during the year. 
The widespread hunger for irrigated Government land was shown 
by the number of inquiries which followed the announcement of an 
opening of 16 farms on the Yuma project. More than a thousand 
letters were received, nearly every State in the Union being repre- 
sented. It was necessary to holS a drawing for every one of the 
farms, as 724 applicants were present at the opening. 



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DEVELOPMENT OF RECLAMATION PROJECTS. 21 

Two small land openings occurred during the year — Newlands 
project, 11 farms; xmna project, 16 farms. On June 30, 1918, 
there were 295 unentered farm units on all the reclamation projects. 
On June 30, 1919, there were 133 unentered farms. During the 
year there were added 27 units, so that the total mmiber of farm 
units entered that year was 189. The remaining unentered farms 
represent the poorest tracts in the projects. Many are seeped and 
must be drained; others are rough or oadly cut by canals and ditches. 

The past year was the most active in the history of the Service 
in the transfer of private lands on the projects. The sales bjr original 
owners in whole or in part of their ranches amounted to millions of 
dollars, and prices of land which a few years ago was desert and 
worthless ranged from $100 to $1,000 per acre. In these transfers 
it was noted that many of the purchasers were from other projects 
whereon they had been successful, and the change was made usually 
by reason of a desire for a milder climate. Montana farmers have 
sold at good prices to Mississippi Valley farmers and have trans- 
ferred to Idaho and Oregon, while the Idaho farmer -has joined the 
nimibers thronging to Califomia. With plenty of money and experi- 
ence, the newcomers are valuable additions to the. communities in 
which they locate. 

Land values are constantly rising on all the projects. A notable 
example of this is shown^in tne sale of State and school lands on the 
Belle Fourche project last April. The lands offered, 2,124 acres, 
were listed for sale three years ago with no purchasers, although the 
prices were very reasonable and the terms most generous. In the 
April sale every acre was sold and the competition was so keen that 
the prices in every case were above the minimum set by the State. 
Lands which in 1916 found no bidders at $12 to $20 per acre sold 
quickly for $20 to $50, the purchaser in each instance assiunin^ an 
obligation to pay $60 per acre to the Government for a water right. 

The demand of the soldiers for opportunities to acquire land over- 
shadows everything in connection with settlement work, but it wiU 
not be a wise policy to overlook the very urgent and increasing call 
for similar opportimities from citizens who were unable to wear the 
colors. Every consideration of good policy that can be advanced 
stresses the need of increasing greatly the acreage for settlers on all 
public land projects as well as the taking up of new projects without 
delay. Neglect and long deferment of dennite plans for rapid land 
development may still tms hunger. 

Incjluding areas under Warren Act contracts, served from Grovem- 
ment wor£, the national reclamation policy has resulted in an 
annual crop production of $100,000,000 or over from lands which a 
short time ago returned nothing. To it must be attributed also the 
establishment of more than 200,000 people in prosperous and con- 
tented homes on the land and an equal nimiber in tne cities, towns, 
and villages which are the result of this a^cultural development. 
The progress being made by these communities equals that of the 
most prosperous regions of our coimtry. With millions of acres of 
e(}ually favorable land awaiting development and thousands of 
citizens clamoring for farms, it is most important that a liberal policy 
in jwroviding f im(k to construct the necessary works should be f oDowea 
by C!ongres8. 



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22 



EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL. REPORT OF RECLAMATION SBRVICB. 



During the coming year land openings will occur on the North 
Platte and Shoshone projects, ana a few additional farms will be- 
available on the Newlands project. In December, 1919,6,000 acres 
of land on the Yimia Mesa wiU be sold at auction. The funds derived 
from the sale are to be used in constructing a power and piunping 
plant and the distribution system. These lands are described as 
Deing practically frostless and peculiarly adapted to the production 
of citrus fruits. 



ABB PROJECT 8ETTLEBS PEBMANENTP 

In order to determine to what degree settlement on reclamation 
projects is permanent, an investigation was made of a number of 
representative projects: 

Five of the projects selected for investigation, namely, Himtley, 
Minidoka, North Platte, Shoshone, and Umatilla, were thought to 
have experienced unusually trying conditions for the settlers, and 
one, Boise, was thought to nave been quite favorable. Letters were 
sent to the project managers of these six projects asking the number 
of original settlers still in possession and the number of transfers made 
by otner settlers, together with any proper explanations. 

Although the figures are probably not infaJIiole. they are as nearly 
correct as possible. The margin of error is douDtless small in any 
case. The chance for greatest variation is in the number given for 
total farm units, because these are constantly changing and sub- 
dividing. 

One of the projects, Minidoka, was also checked up by consulting 
the tract boolffl in the General Land Office in Washington. 

Following is a tabulation from the reports received: 



Pro^t. 



Settlers 
still In 
possession, 
or who have 
satisfied 
homestead 
require- 
ments. 



Boise, Idaho 

Hmitiey, Mont 

Minidoka, Idaho 

Nbrth PJatte, Nebr.-Wyo 

Shoshone, Wyo 

Umatilla, Oreg 

Total 



987 
3S3 
899 
723 
4Q5 
136 



3,633 



Total 

number of 

settlers. 



1,273 

889 

2,709 

2,156 

902 



8,167 



Per cent 
of total. 



89.1 
65.0 
65.8 
64.0 
66.6 
69.3 



66.2 



Total 

number of 

of farm 

units. 



1,107 

689 

1,609 

1,337 

609 

196 



6,447 



Number 

of settlers 

per farm 

unit. 



1.14 
1.42 
1.68 
1.61 
1.48 
1.47 



1.49 



From the figures quoted, it is computed that the avera^ number 
of settlers to a farm unit on the Boise project, where conditions were 
favorable, was 1.14, or slightly more than one — truly a remarkable 
showine when it is considered that farms in general often ^o through 
many changes in ownership, and only 1.68 on the Minidoka project, 
where conditions were adverse. 

Opponents to homestead and reclamation acts have argued that 
settlers take up their farms merely for specidation. Although no 
effort has been made to learn the changes on reclamation projects 
after title had been obtained, results indicate slight changes during 
the time of proving up. 



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DEVELOPMENT OF BBOIAMATIOK PROJECTS. 23 

Before the end of the period required for residence, settlers may- 
relinquish their right and for money consideration pass on the farm 
unit. This can swely be done only when the relinquishment paper 
is filed simultaneously with another entry. Any such transactions 
may come under the notice of the project office if the settlers are 
known personally. Giving up an entry does not by any means indi- 
cate that the entryman has failed to make good on his farm. It 
may show quite the contrary — that he has succeeded so well he is 
able to sell out his improved farm for a good figure. This kind of 
speculation can hardly oe avoided. 

The first few years of the Reclamation Service were the most 
severe for the project settlers. Water was not available at this 
time, and under the law settlers could not be prevented from taking 
up land which might not receive water for years. Having seen how 
often it worked hardship for settlers to struggle along until water 
was ready, the service secured the passage of a law which prohibited 
the entering of farm imits until the irrigating system is in operation, 
resulting unquestionably in even ^eater permanence of settlers on 
projects opened imder these conditions. 

The investigation has shown conclusively in connection with Fed- 
eral projects that there is 'not the slightest basis for the statement 
so often and so loosely made that ^'tnroughout the newer parts of 
America at least three settlers in succession attempt to develop a 
farm before one succeeds." 

IBBIGATION AND CBOP BESTTXTS, 1918. 

The usual census of irrigation and crop results on the Government 
reclamation projects, as described in previous annual reports, was 
continued during the period covered by the present report. Obvi- 
ously such information is not adapted to fiscal years and the figures 
that follow are for the last growing season or calendar year, that of 
1918. On the Salt River project, Arizona, where some crop is grow- 
ing at all times of the year, a convenient period is taken as the agri- 
cmtural year from October 1 to September 30, which date approxi- 
mately marks the transition from the heavy summer production to 
the winter crops. On that project operation and maintenance of 
the works built by^the Government have been turned over to the 
Salt River Valley Water Users' Association and in the following sta- 
tistics of crop production the figures for that project are gathered 
and fumishea by the association. Similarly on the CTavity unit of 
the Minidoka project, Idaho, the Minidoka irrigation district handles 
the operation ana maintenance and has compiled the crop data. On 
the King Hill project in the same State, the data are furnished by 
the King Hill irrigation district. The poor showing on this project 
is due to the bad condition of the canal system, which was built under 
private auspices. The United States has undertaken its reconstruc- 
tion and tms work is under way, but not sufficiently advanced to 
insure a good water supply to the bulk of the project. The Govern- 
ment has not undertaken operation and maintenance on this project, 
which are handled by the aistrict. 

In the discussion of the projects in subsequent pages of this report 
the crop report of each is given. In the adjoined tables these reports 



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24 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

have been summarized, and further details are given in the ap- 
pendix. 

It will be noted that these reports do not give the total values of 
farm products in that they include nothing from farm animals. 
The project census does not cover the income from live stock or 
stock products, but it is known that large additional returns are 
realized from sales of animals, poultry, dairy products, wool, and 
honey. 

It should also be noted that the crop reports by no means cover 
the entire area to which water is made available and delivered from 
the works built by the Reclamation Service. In general these 
statistics are limited to those areas for which the United States 
has built a complete system from the point of storage or diversion 
to the laterals serving each farm and where the Government is 
operating such works, thus employing a force of ditch riders in fre- 
quent touch with the irrigators. This provides a ready means of 
gathering census data of more than ordinary accuracy and at little 
or no extra expense, since the time for collecting these coincides 
with that when the water deliveries are dwindUng in the fall and 
the ditch riders, while still required for occasional deliveries, have 
less onerous duties in connection with the operation and protection 
of the system. 

In addition to the tracts covered by the crop reports there is a 
large and growing area dependent in various degrees on the Govern- 
ment works for water supply through special contracts, mainly 
under the Warren Act, callmg for delivery of water in bulk from the 
reservoirs or at various stages of distribution to the land. This 
large area is not covered by the crop reports nor included in the 
following statistics though comparable in the aggregate to the area 
thus reported. The following tabulations, therefore, are merely 
summaries of the crop reports obtained and are so entitled; they 
fail to give, possibly by 50 per cent, the total production made pos- 
sible by the works built imder the reclamation law. 

However, a summary of the crop reports received gives some 
impressive figures of the values that have been secured from the 
desert lands oy the provision of irrigation water. The following 
table summarizes the reports by projects, and it will be noticed that 
for several of these the crop values produced average oyer $100 per 
acre. These averages are for all farms and all crops in the large 
tracts covered by the census, including the least successful with 
the most successful irrigators and averaging with banner crops those 
of low yield or any of entire failure due to pests or other causes. 
The average returns per acre therefore are an index for a large area 
in each case, and far greater results are secured by many of the 
most skilled and successful settlers. 



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DEVELOPMENT OF KECLAMATTON PROJECTS. 
Summary of 1918 crop reports by projects^ 



25 



State and project. 



Arisona: Salt River 

Arizona-California: Yuma 

Califomia: Orland 

Colorado: 

Grand Valley 

Uncompahgre 

Idaho: 

Boise 

Covered by census 

KingHUlT 

MWdoka 

Montana: 

Huntley 

Milk River* 

Sun River » 

Montana- North Fakota: Lower Yellow- 
stone" 

Nebraska-Wyomhig: 

North Platte— 

Interstate unit 

N. P. C. AC. Co. lands 

Fort Laramie " , 

Nevada: Newlands 

New Mexico: Carlsbad , 

New Mexico-Texas: RioOrandc 

Oregon: Umatilla , 

Oregon-California: Klamath 

Sooth Dakota: Belle Fourche 

Utah: Strawberry Valley , 

Washinfton: 

Okanogan , 

Yakima— 

Sunnyside unit , 

Tietonunit : 

W3roming-Shoshone: 

Garland unit 

Frannie unit " , 



Irrigable 
acreage.* 



4 212,960 
73,000 
20,533 

35,000 
100,000 

• 274,220 
143,780 
14,500 
121,392 

31,360 

58,ono 

14,978 
42,232 



120,778 

12,132 
71,817 
24,990 
92,300 
34,658 
50,000 
82,592 
50,000 

10,099 

98,637 
82,000 

\ 55,296 



Total ; 

Covered by census. . 



1,732,374 
1,601,934 



Irrigated 
acreage. 



Cropped 
acreage." 



{ 



ft 206, 616 I 
46,670 ' 
14,764 I 

8,102 
58,270 

•117,024 

95,074 

1,849 

106,061 

19,262 
24,843 
7,569 

21,075 



88,771 
9,137 
4,865 
42,311 
19,460 
64,781 
9,100 
33,268 
52,445 
32,539 

6,402 

84,660 
26,400 

33,552 

4,730 



Crop value. 



Total. 



184,432 $18,188,800 
45,049 5,105,132 
12,075 I 709,172 



1,141,516 
1,119,566 



6,387 
57,310 



90,720 

1,677 

98,182 

19,262 
23,800 
7,832 

21,000 



85,308 
9,137 
4,865 
41,490 
18,200 
64,002 
6,819 
32,127 
52,445 
29,788 

5,287 

70,466 
25,846 

32,960 
4,729 



1,061,193 



414,310 
3,302,460 



5,164,646 

45,588 

5,168,078 

750,963 
408,716 
245,852 

669,191 



3,100,710 

313,064 

61,815 

1,696,142 

1,106,615 

4,237,020 

400,642 

929,131 

1,276,115 

1,642,327 

749,962 

7,213,392 
2,616,261 

1,370,660 
115,722 



66,820,396 



Per acre. 



198.70 
113.32 
58.73 

64.87 
57.62 



56.80 
27.18 
62.64 

39.00 
17.17 
31.39 

31.85 



36.35 
34.26 
"12.71 
» 63. 16 
60.74 
66.20 
58.76 
28.92 
24.36 
65.13 

141.86 

102.86 
97.36 

41.69 
1*34.47 



63.60 



1 Excluding substantial areas (private canals) to which water is furnished under the Warren Act. Tata 
are for calendar year (irrigation season), except on Salt River project data arc for corresponding "agri- 
cultural year," (Jctober, 1917, to November, 1918. 

» Area Reclamation Service was prepared to supply water. 

• Irrigated crops. Excludes small areas on few projects cropped by dry farming. 

• Inouides so-called "dry lands" given right to rent water temporarily on account of ample storage. 

» Includes about 5,000 acres within town sites , about 11,000 acres reported *' vacant' ' and probably largely 
pastured, and over 6,000 acres of "homo tracts" including house lots, etc. 

• Irrigable acreage includes New York Canal, Nampa-Meridian, and Pioneer district lands served proiect 
water. Irrigated acreage here reported is limited to area served full water supply, excluding vested right 
lands given partial service. 

' Poor results on this project are due to condition of canal system, which was built under private auspices . 
The United States has undertaken its reconstructicm; (^ration and maintenance arc handled by the 
settlers through an Irrigation district. 

• Crop reports covered an additional area of 3,119 acres cropped by dry farming, producing crops worth 
$21,619, or 16.93 per acre . 

» Above figures are for 187 irri^tod farms, which included small tracts farmed without irrigaticm. In 
addition, crop reports covered 7 farms operated without irrigation, on which 109 acres yielded crops worth 
$1,996, or $18.33 per acre. 

w Crop reports covered an additional area of 5,346 acres dry-farmed producing crops worth $60,886, or 
$11.30 per acre. 

" New lands, first year of irrigation. 

^ For crops in full producticm, excluding 9,662 acres of wild-grass pasture and 3,081 acres otherwise not in 
fun production. For all crops, $39.30. 

For all projects the crop reports show a gross value of over 
$66,000,000, or an average of $63.60 for each of the 1,050,000 acres 
cropped. These reports covereci an hrigated acreage of 1,119,000 
and 1,600,000 acres that were irrigable, i. e., for which the works 
were ready to supply water. This does not, however, indicate a 
failure to utilize 500,000 acres and the water ready for it, as shown 
in the preceding discussion. 



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26 



EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL BEPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 



For the Salt River project, Arizona, the water users' association 
reported a total crop value of over $18,000,000. Under the contract 
by wluch the association assumed the operation and maintenance 
oi the works and agreed to reimburse the United States for their 
construction, the amount fixed for the latter purpose is approxi- 
mately $10,279,000. Thus the crop value in a single year is more 
than 150 per cent of the construction cost the association is to repay 
to the United States over a period of 20 years and most of whicn 
will be supplied by power profits from the project works. 

On some of the other projects the development has reached the 
staee where the annual crop value is comparable to the total cost of 
building the irrigation works. The Minidoka project, Idaho, which 
cost about $5,700,000, yielded crops in 1918 worth $5,160,000. Prior 
to the Government work the project was entirely sage-brush desert. 
The Yakima project, Washington, costing to date about $10,000,000, 
yielded crops worth $9,733,000 in 1918. 

In tiie following table the crop reports are summarized by crops 
and comparison with similar tabulations for previous years shows 
relatively small changes in the general character and relative im- 
portance of the crops grown, -flfalfa continues as the great basic 
crop occupying 40 per cent of the crop area and furnishing one-third 
of the total crop value. Wheat advanced from 12 per cent in 1917 
to 16 per cent of total crop area reported in 1918. The acreage in 
cotton on the southwestern projects doubled. Eight million bushels 
of grain, a like amount of v^etables and truck, 165,000,000 pounds 
of fruit, and 267,000 tons of sugar beets were harvested from the 
lands covered by the crop reports. But over half the crop area was 
devoted to hay and forage crops, largely converted to animal prod- 
ucts by feeding on the projects. 

Summary of crop reports on reclamaUon projects in 1918. 





Acreage cropped. 


Yields. 


Crop value. 


Crop. 


Total. 


Percent. 


Unit. 


Total 1 ^^e™ge 
*^^*- 1 per acre. 


Average 
per acre. 


Total. 


Per 
cent. 


Cereals: 

Barley 


29,698 
34,944 
46,951 
1,942 
166,138 


2.8 
3.3 
4.5 
.2 
15.8 


Bu.... 
Bu.... 
Bu.... 
Bu,... 
Bu.... 


876,070 

1,017,090 

1,300,410 

20,010 

3,708,170 


29 
29 
28 
10 
22 


$36.20 
48.50 
25.00 
15.30 
43.10 


$1,074,768 

1,674,496 

1,176,413 

29,741 

7,164,646 


1.6 


Oom 


2.6 


fjats 


1.8 


Rye 




^iVlieat 


10.7 






Total 


279,673 


26.6 


Bu.... 


6,921,850 


25 


39.60 


11,120,064 


16.6 








Other Krain and seed : 

Alfalfa seed 

Clover seed 

Grain sorghum. . . 

Flaxseed 

Millet seed 


9,231 

8,884 

27,3?6 

1,710 

642 


:l 

2.6 
.2 


Bu.... 
Bu.... 
Bu.... 
Bu.... 
Bu.... 


41,100 
35,060 
1,028,040 
10,330 
15,840 


4.5 1 54.50 
4 71.00 

38 64.40 
6 19.80 

25 ' 24.90 


50^796 

630,855 

1,759,718 

33,920 

15,975 


.8 
1.0 
2.6 










Total 


47,793 4.6 


Bu.... 


1,130,370 




61.60 


2,943,264 


4.4 








Hay and forage: 

Alfalfa hay 

Clover hay 

Other hay 

Com fodder 

Peas 


419,612 

7,290 

30,340 

5,234 

308 

3,779 

113,637 


39.9 

.7 

2.9 

.5 


Ton... 
Ton... 
Ton... 
Ton... 
Bu.... 
Ton... 


1,318,780 
14 500 
42,250 
18, 110 
4,830 
25,680 


3.1 ' 54.10 
2 1 25.30 

1.4 1 25.40 

3.5 24.50 
16 38. 8D 


22,720,050 
184,455 
767,385 
127,864 
11,960 
214,751 
1,730,969 


134.0 

.8 

1.1 

.2 


Other forage 

Pasture 


.4 

10.8 


7 


56.80 
» 15.20 


.4 

2.6 














Total 


580,200 fifi.2 








44.40 


25,757,454 38.6 










== 






1 ■ 



1 This figure does not represent average value of pasture for a year or season, as considerable areas pastured 
were al90 harvested and are included m the duplicate area. 



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DBAINAGB. 

Svmmary of crop reports on redamation projects in 1918 — Continued. 



27 





Acreage cropped. 


Yields. 


Crop vahie. 




Crop. 


Total. 


Percent. 


Unit. 


Total. 


Average 
per acre. 


Average 
per acre. 


Total. 


Per 
cent. 


Vegetables and track: 
Beans 


10,711 
407 

28,332 
209 

11,635 


1.0 


Bu.... 
Bu.... 
Bu.... 
Bu.... 


141,150 

98,660 

4,484,370 

18,920 


14 
242 
168 

91 


$54.30 
163.00 
133.00 
106.00 
146.00 


$681,642 
66,361 

3,775,503 
21,938 

1,701,289 


$0.9 


Onions 


.1 


Potatoes, white.. 
Potatoes, sweet. . 


2.7 


5.7 


Track 


1.1 


2.6 












Total. . .. 


51,294 


4.9 








120.00 


6,146,733 


o.a 












Fralts and nuts: 
Apples 


26,121 
1,995 
3,449 

633 
2,151 

987 
2,643 


2.5 
.2 
.3 
.1 


Lb.... 
Lb.... 
Lb.... 
Lb ... 


97,299,240 
6, 61?, 480 

21,265,500 
3,512,430 

13,571,160 
1,803,690 

21,778,320 


3,725 
3,310 
6,160 
5,560 
6,310 
1,830 
8,240 


107.00 
110.00 
194.00 
256.00 
253.00 
203.00 
272.00 


2, 809, r 9 
219,*^ 
668,956 
161,071 
544,946 
200,978 
718,958 


4.2 


Peaches 


.3 


Pears 


1.0 


Prunes 


.2 


Citrus fruits 

8maU fruit 

IClsoellaneous — 


.2 1 Lb.... 
.1 1 Lb.... 
.2 1 Lb.... 


.8 

.3 

1.1 


ToUl 


37,979 


3.6 1 Lb.... 165.842.720 


4,365 


140.00 


5,323,267 


7.9 






' ' 




Miscellaneous: 

Sugar beets 

CotUm 


27,133 
86,470 


2.6 Ton... 
8.2 Lb.... 


267,130 

60,412,540 

18.980 


9.9 
700 
4.4 


101.00 
141.00 


2,731,871 
12.193.480 


4.1 
18.8 


Cane 


4,300 1 .4 Lb 


66.60 , 286,340 
18.90 318,952 


.4 


Other crops 


16,826 1 1.6 


Ton...i 


.5 






Total 


134,729 12.8 


! 


115.00 ' 15,530,648 


28.3 




' 




Duplication 


80,475 7.6 
1,051,193 ' 100.0 


1 1 






All crops 


::::::::i::::::::::::i:::::::::: 


63.60 i 66.82i.396 


100.0 
















' ' 





DBAIHAGE. 

A description of investigations on drainage work in proCTess will 
be found under the discussion of projects. Reference is also made 
to previous annual reports, especially the twelfth, thirteenth, four- 
teenth, and sixteenth, for discussion of the causes of seepage and 
water-logging and the remedies necessary to reclaim ana protect 
lands from damage. 

A smnmary of the work accomplished by the various projects in 
the period from July 1, 1918, to June 30, 1919, is shown in the fol- 
lowing table: 



Project. 


Miles of drain. 


Number 
machines 
operated. 


Excava- 
tion.! 


Total 

drainage 

cost.s 


Open. 


Closed. 


Boise 


17.6 




2 


Cubic fards. 
700,211 


$89,163.67 


Flathead 




1,518.77 


Grand Valley '. 


16.7 




4 
1 
3 
1 
4 
*\2 
3 
1 


389,381 
5,618 

203,580 
3.208 

413,515 
3,745,759 

159,350 

185,000 


ni2,306.44 


Huntlev '.. 


0.9 


12,016.21 


Klamaih 


12.0 
.09 
14.89 
76.00 
4.29 
5.80 


64,428.09 


K«^lHnd» 




14,212.77 


North Platte 


1.04 


90,755.43 


Rio Orande 


644,416.52 


Shoshone 


6.74 


73,350.98 


Yuma 


73,429.47 








Total 


149.48 


8.68 


31 


5,813,388 


1,065,608.79 







» Excavation does not include backfill. 

* Cost includes excavaticm, structures, right of wav, and overhead expenses. 
» To June 1, 1919. 

* Includes 1 contract machine. 



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28 



EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 



It will be noted that 31 excavating machines were operated, 30 
by the Reclamation Service and 1 by contract, and that approxi- 
mately 149i niiles of open drains and 8.7 miles of closed drains 
were constructed during the year. The largest drainage program 
is being carried on on 3ie Rio Grande project, New Mexico-Texas, 
where during the year 76 miles of open drams were constructed and 
12 excavating machines were in operation. Important drainage 
work was also carried on on the Grand Valley project, Colorado, and 
the Boise project, Idaho. 

The following table gives an estimate of the seepage condition and 
the total resulte accomplished up to June 30, 1919: 

Estimate of seepage and nummary of drainage to June 30, 1919. 



Project 



Estimat- 
ed area 

thatwUl 
be pro- 
tected 

when all 
drains 
author- 
ised 
have 

beraiooo- 

stnicted. 



Total 




Arisona-Caliloniia: 
Yuma— 

Bard and Indian 
Yuma Valley 
Colorado: 

OrandValley 

Grand valley drainage district 
Uncompahgre 
Idaho: 
Boise— 

Riverside and Big Bend. . 
Pioneer irrieation district, 
Nampa Meridian district 
Other parts of project 

KinaHiU 

Hinidoka (gravity unit) 
Montana: 

Flathead (Indian) 

Huntley 

Milk River. 

Sun River (Fort Shaw) 
Montana-North Dakota: 
Lower Yellowstone 
Nebraska- Wyoming: 

North Platte (interstate) 
Nevada: 

Newlands — 

Fallon division 
Femley division 
New Mexico: 

Carlsbad 

New Mexico-Texas: 
Rio Grande 

Mosilla VaUey 

Montoyo 

El Paso Valley 
Rincon Valley 
Oreeon: 
Klamath 
Umatilla 
South Dakota: 

Belle Fourche 
Washington: 
Yaldma- 
Sunnyside, 
Tie ton 
Wyoming: 
Shoshone. 



1 Surface drains and waste ditches not included. 



t Coostructed by land owners. 

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POWER DEVELOPMENT. 29 

The data relative to areas protected or to be protected by drains 
when completed are dependent on many factors. It is impossible 
in advance of complete irrigation over a given area to foretell with 
certainty what portion may become seeped and waterlogged. The 
amount of water used and the manner in which it is applied to the 
soil are important factors in influencing the spread of seepage. 
These are dependent upon the care and still of tne irrigator. Tflie 
natural drainage of djjfferent soils can be only roughly approxi- 
mated yet it is of great importance in preventing the rise of ground 
water. On account of these and other equally undeterminable 
factors, the results given in this table should be regarded as expres- 
sions of opinion rather than accurate engineering determinations. 
The tabulation of drains constructed to June 30, 1919, given in this 
table, shows the growing importance of drainage work and it will 
be noted that a total of approximately 922 miles of open and closed 
drains have been constructed to date to protect and reclaim lands 
from seepage which have been placed under irrigation by the 
Reclamation Service. 

POWEE DEVELOPMENT. 

In connection with the investigation of secondary projects, several 
power sites were investigated during the year and tentative plans 
made for their development. It is apparent that the development 
of hydraulic power for irrigation pumping will play an increasingly 
important part in future projects. The continued satisfactory 
operation of the large Minidoka South Side pumping unit and of 
other pumping svstems furnishes ample evidence of the reliability 
of this metnod of water supply. 

Power development actually in progress during the year was 
confined to the completion oi plants already under construction 
and minor extensions and improvements to existing power systems. 

The following tables show power and pumping plants installed on 
various projects and the results of operation for the fiscal year. 



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30 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SBRVIOB. 




I. 



J 



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EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE 









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POWER DEVELOPMENT. 



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36 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVIOE. 

XJNDEVBLOPED POWER. 

In the following table are listed the power sites more or less com- 
pletely investigated by the Reclamation Service but which have not 
teen developed. The data given are necessarily, in most cases, 
only roughly approximate. 

rude re loped water power. 



Project. 



Name of plant. 



Arizona-CalifoTD ia : 

Yuma 

Do 

Do 

California: 

Iron Canyon 

Orland 

Pit River 

Do 

Do 

C<dorado: 

Grand Valley »■ 

Uncompahgre » 

Idaho: 

Boise 

Do» 

Minidoka 

Do 

Montana: 

Flathead (Indian) 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Huntley 

Montana-North Dakota: 

Lower Yellowstone » 

Nebraska: 

North Platte^ 

Nevada: 

Newlands 

Do 

New Mexico-Texas: Rio 

Grande. 
Oregon: 

Columbia River 

Deschutes 

Silver I^ke 

UmatUla 

Warner Valley 

WiUamette VaUey 

Do 

Do 



Drop iu California Canal., 
Araz. 



Laguna Dam (doubtful).. 



Iron Canyon 

Drop, him line to South Canal . 

HatCireek. 

Fall River 

Big Bend 



Main Canal... 
Various sites. 



ArrowrockDam 

Various sites 

Minidoka Dam 

Head of Walcott Lake. 



No. 1 Newell Tunnel 

No. 2 Buffalo Dam 

No. 3 

No. 4 

No. 6 

Second drop, main canal . 



Lateral K. K. drop.. 
Pathfinder Dam 



Lahomtan 

26-foot drop 

Elephant Butte Dam . 



Oregon-Califomia: Klamath. 
Utah: Strawberry Valley. . . . 
Washington: 

Columbia River 

Okanogan 

Do 

Yakima-Sunnyside 

Do 

Yakima-Ticton 

Yakima-Wapato 

Do 

Do 

Do 

Wyoming: Shoshone 



Celilo Falls 

4 sites 

Silver Crei'k 

Drainage outfall 

Deep Creek 

Santiam River and Marion Lake 

McKenzie River, 2 plants 

Middle Fork, Willamette and Waldo Lake 

Storage 

Various sites 

Spanish Fork 

I Priest Rapids 

Salmon Creek No. 1 

Salmon Creek No. 3 

I Mabton 

Main Canal 

Lateral E 

DropO 

Prop 1 

Drop 2 

I Drop 3 

i Shoshone 



Head. 



Fret. 
10 
2-2 

rtO-130 

27 

200 

70-400 

HnO-900 

31-48 
18-180 

HO-230 

20-90 

46 

46 

169 
48 
24 
88 
19 
41 

34 

«0-200 

120 

26 

♦kV185 



45-105 
65-110 
48-120 



Total. 



415-550 
«4,400 

21-88 
126 

60 
347 
441 
44 
54 
100 
24 
40 
32 
34 
200 



Horsepower. 



1,200 
9.000 
4.000 

35.000 

678 

9,000-12,000 

7.000-«0»000 

150,000 

8,000 
40,000 

10.000-20,000 

1,900 

10,000 

30,000 

130,000 
88,000 
19,000 
70,000 
15,000 
276 

814 

17,000-60,000 

6,000 
2,900 
12,000 

500.000-800,000 
90,000-100,000 
2,900 
145 
2,000 
14,000 
30.500 
65,000 

10,000 
1.500 

200,000 

2,000 

2,560 

131 

276 

3,410 

2,930 

4,083 

2.443 

1,488 

40.000 

1,506.300-1,954,300 



» Power from irrigation flow only. 



s SoveiEl stages. 



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POWER DEVELOPMENT. 37 

BIiBCTBIOAL AND HBCHANIOAL BNOIMBBRING. 

In addition to routine duties, the electrical and mechanical divi- 
sion of the Denver ofiBice accomplished the following work dunng the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1919: 

Arizona-California, Yuma project — ^The Yuma Valley drainage 
pumping plant was tested to determine its cai>acity and fuel economy. 

Colorado, Orand VdUey project. — ^The designs of the Price Stub 
pumping plant were completed and after completion of construction 
work the direct pumping imit was tested for efficiency and capacity 
with very satisfactory results. 

Iddhp,^ Minidoka project. — ^Plans for a 10,000-kilowatt extension of 
the Minidoka power plant were made, but construction work was 
postponed on account of the war. The commercial power situation 
was given careful consideration in view of the early expiration of the 
power contracts with the towns of Rupert, Heyoum, and Burley, 
and specifications for new contracts were prepared. One bid was 
received but no award had been made at the end of the fiscal year. 

Nebraska- Wyoming, North Platte project. — Plans and specifications 
were prepared for repairs to the outlets of the Pathfinder Reservoir 
and for the installation of two additional regulating outlets to be 
connected with the north timnel. The designs of the new outlets 
provide for plugging the tunnel and constructing concrete lined water 

Sassages to the nice of the cliff where balanced needle valves of special 
esign will be installed to discharge freely into the canyon below the 
dam. Emei^ency gates immediately above the neeme valves will 
provide for inspection and repair of the reg[ulatin^ valves and pro- 
tection against freezing during the nonirrigation season. The 
Lio^e power plant was placed m operation and tested with satis- 
factory results in April, 1919. A contract for the delivery of power 
to the town of Torrington for commercial distribution was negotiated 
and assistance given the town in the purchase of equipment for 
receiving the power from the Government line. Assistance was 
given in the arrangement and construction of Gk)vemment telephone 
circuits for the project and in the drawing of contracts with the local 
telephone company for switching service. 

New Mexico-Te^casy Rio Ghwrne project. — Designs were made and 
material purchased for replacing worn parts and immroving the 
operation of the balanced valves at the Elephant Butte Dam. Fur- 
ther studies are in progress of the possibilities of developing power at 
Elephant Butte, and at various sites along the proposed nigh-line 
oanal. 

North Dakota, North Dakota pumping project. — ^Assistance was 
given in revising the power contract with the city of Williston and in 
negotiations for the sale of additional power from the steam plant. 
Repairs preparatory to the operation of the pumping plants during 
the season of 1919 were made and assistance given in securing plant 
-operators during the epidemic of influenza. 

Utah, Strawherry Valley project. — As a result of conferences with 
the representatives of the project towns, new contracts were ex- 
ecuted with Payson, Spanish Fork, and Salem, providing for the 
delivery of power for retail distribution at the standard rates adopted 
for the Strawberry Vallev project. Power is also being sold to ii 
company of farmers on Mapleton Bench and to the Springville Caii- 



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38 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE, 

ning Co. at the same rates. The gross income from the sale of power 
has Deen considerably increased by the new contracts, and the power 
system is now considered, to be on a self-supporting basis. 

Wdshingtoriy Okanogan project, — ^In connection with the investiga- 
tion of supplemental water supply, studies were made of several new 
pumping plants, and various plans for operating the present power 
system. Consideration was given to plans for utilizing the trans- 
mission line for the delivery of power to adjacent farms. 

Washington, YaMma project , Sunny side unit. — ^The Prosser and 
Spring Creek direct pumpii^ plants were placed in operation and 
testen with satisfactory results in April, 1919. The smaller unit in 
the Snipes Mountain pumping plant was fitted with a new pump 
runner to correct former deficiencies, and its performance now ex- 
ceeds the contractors' ^aranties. Settlement was made with the 
Piatt Iron Works for direct pumping units installed at the Outlook 
plant. 

Wyoming^ Shoshone project. — ^The possibility of developing power 
at Shoshone dam for commercial use in the valley was studied. 

Secondary jyrojeds. — In connection with the AH American Canal 
project preiiminery designs and estimates were made for three power 
plants with capacities of 19, 000 horsepower, 18, 000 horsepower, and 
26,000 horsepower, respectively. Further studies were made of the 
power and pumping system for the Yuma Mesa Extension. The 
Orchard-Mesa pumping plant was studied with a view to adapting 
it to the new conditions of the proposed rehabilitation of the project. 
Revised estimates for the power and pumping plants for the Hill- 
crest extension of the Boise project, were prepared, and further study 
given to the possibility of supplying power to the Gem irrigation 
district from Arrowrock Dam. Extensive investigations of the power 
plants and sites along the Snake River, Idaho, were made in con- 
nection with the American Falls Reservoir project. Designs and 
estimates of numerous large power plants, pumping plants, and trans- 
mission lines were made for the Minidoka North Side pumping 
extension. 

All projVc/*.— Collaborating with the civil engineering division of 
the Denver office, a report on the experience of the Keclamation 
Service with large capacity reservoirs outlets is being prepared. 

CEMENT TESTHTG WORK. 

On July 1, 1917, the cement testing woik for the Reclamation 
Service was turned over to the Bureau of Standards of the Depart- 
ment of Commerce. Prior to that date this work was handled by a- 
cement expert employed by the service, and laboratories were main- 
tained for this purpose at Denver and San Francisco. 

The following table shows by years the number of barrels for 
which tests were made, and the amoimt and per cent accepted since 
January 1, 1904, when the testing laboratory was established, to- 
Jime 30, 1917, when the work was turned over to the Bureau of 
Standards. The amount accepted during the fiscal years 1918 and 
1919 is also given, but the per cent accepted can not be stated, as 
the testing was included in similar work handled for other depart- 
ments, and segregation is impracticable. 



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PUBCHASE OF DCATBBIAL AKD SUPFUBS. 



39 






Amount 

for 
which 
tests 
were 
made. 


Acoeptod. 


Year. 


Amomit. 


Percent. 


-Fafi 1, \¥Ht tA Jnnh 30, 1<V)9 


Barrelt. 
160,044 

197,321 
147,554 
196,097 
140,203 
03,086 
160,553 
181,653 
404,885 
602 288 
171,213 
114,463 


Barrels. 
146,602 

191,204 
187,526 
163,733 
127,748 
88,986 
149,308 
170,478 
391,135 
583 588 
168,213 
111,163 
60.980 
39,671 


91.6 


Year ending Jnne 30—' 

1907 •. 


96.9 


1908 


93.2 


1900 


83.5 


1910 


91.1 


1911 


94.6 


1912... 


92.9 


1913 


93.8 


1914 


96.6 


1915 


96.9 


1916 


98.2 


1917 . • 


97.7 


1918 




1919 












Total 




2,530,320 











Rej^ar sets of long-time tests have been continued. In the ap- 
pendix will be found a table giving the averse results of all tests on 
accepted cement from January 1, 1904, to June 30, 1919. 

PXTBCHASE OF MATEBIAL AHD SITPPLIES. 

Most of the important purchases for the service are made by the 
Denver office, where a purchasing department is maintained. The 
The project offices purchase direct perishable foods, forage, and such 
other commodities as can be purcnased locally to best advantage. 
By purchasing through the Denver office all projects get the benents 
iimerent in lar^enscale purchases, and in the purchase of materials of 
construction, uie purchasing department of that office has the ad- 
vantage of advice of the several endmeers and technical departments. 

The purchasing department has been handicapped during the past 
year by very a(hrerse inarket and transportation conditions, many 
iirms being unable to deliver materials with any degree of promptness. 

During the fiscal year 1919 tiie total number of purchases was 
5,038, with a total value of $1,489,583.04, and the cash discounts 
earned by prompt payments of bills amounted to $8,727.12, leaving 
B net amoimt of $1,480,855.92 expended through this department. 
Crovemment bills of lading numbering 3,777, were issued, covering 
the movement of freight, and 6,959 transportation requests were 
issued for travel of employees in the service. 

The following comparative tabulation shows a summary of data 
•covering purchases made during the past 10 years: 



Fiscal year. 



1910. 
1911. 
1912. 
1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1018. 
1919. 



Number f 
of pur- I 
chases. 



Gross 
amount. 



1,774 
1,607 
2,205 
2,735 
3,116 
2,854 
5,040 
4,089 
6,215 
5,088 



Total 35,582 



$504,023.60 

574,323.74 

930,018.53 

469,800.17 

471,446.28 

454,661.46 

680,601.99 

1,095,830.36 

1,809,580.84 

1,480,583.04 



8,469,960.01 



Discount. 



84,286.29 
4,604.28 
3,842.09 
6,747.38 
13,000.25 
17,876.29 
8,727.12 



59,063.70 



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40 



EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 



FBEIGHT, PASSEHGEB, AHD EXPBESS TBAHSPOBTATIOV. 

On July 1, 1918, unsettled claims for transportation of freight and 
express amounted to $53,699.59 and during the year new claims 
were filed for like service to the amount of $351,142.22, making a 
total of $404,841.81. Of these, $322,074.45 were given administra- 
tive examination and forwarded to the Treasmry Department, 
approved for payment, leaving $82,767.36 outstanding, of wJHich 
$77,635.23 was with the railroaas for correction. 

At commercial rates the charges on freight and express shipments 
moved during the year would have amounted to $534,880.94. 

Passenger transportation claims to the amount of $69,139.44 were 
examined and passed for payment. 

Refimd claims amountmg to $4,384.33 were filed with carriers on 
commercial shipments for contractors on United States Reclamation 
Service work, the amounts paid being covered into the reclamation 
fund. 

The following table gives general data on freight and express 
transportation smc^ 1906: 



Fiscal year. 



1907 

1908 

1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 

1913 

1914 

1915 

191« 

191? 

1918 

1919 

Total 



I 




Deducted account of 






contracts, land grant, 


BUls 


Commerctol 


and other causes. 


settled. 
$278,782.10 


charges. 

$470,863.26 






Total. 


Percent* 


$192,081.16 


40.8 


369,583.04 


577,830.42 


208,247.38 


36.0 


778,047.12 


1,408,970.10 


625,922.96 


44.6 


437,082.61 


768,808.76 


321,776.15 


42.4 


405,360.55 


666,876.59 


261,516.04 


39.2 


610,740.23 


1,055,733.27 


444,993.04 


42.1 


481,118.91 


837,077.50 


355,958.68 


42.6 


547,705.99 


927,163.49 


379,457.50 


40.9 


778,893.33 


1,393,347.96 


614,454.63 


44.1 


471,606.52 


817,481.33 


345 874.81 


42.3 


398,477.70 


653013.98 


250,536.28 


39.7 


324.662.28 


608,479.63 


283917.35 


46.6 


331,056.20 


534,580.94 


208,524.74 


38.1 


6,207,966.58 


10,705,227.32 


4,497,260.74 


42.0 



LEGAL DIVISION. 

The legal division of the service is in charge of the chief counsel, 
under whom are certain attorneys known as counsel, as well as 
various clerks and stenographers. 

The work of the legal division in the Washington office includes 
the consideration of litigation, irrigation district organization, laws 
and legislation, departmental decisions and regulations, manual 
amendments, public notices, abstracts of title, contracts, etc. 

There are eight main field offices of the legal division located 
respectively at Denver, Colo.; Montrose, Colo; Mitchell, Nebr.: 
Helena, Mont.; Boise, Idaho; Portland, Oreg.; San Francisco, Calif.; 
and El Paso, Tex. There are also three suboffices in the field, located 
respectively at Billings, Mont.; Yakima, Wash.; and Fallon, Nev. 
The attorneys in charge of these offices are known as district counsel 
and are the legal advisers to the various project managers located 
within theii respective districts. 



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PBBSONNK^ 41, 

In the central Denver office is located a district counsel who is 
legal adviser to the chief of construction. Also at Denver are located 
a district counsel in general charge of irrigation district organization 
and one in special charge of the work of passing on titles to land. 

Several million dollars are at present involved in litigation directly 
connected with the Reclamation Service. The immediate super- 
vision of litigated cases is in the Department of Justice, but the l^al 
division of the service takes an active part in preparing and trying all 
such suit€. 

LITIOATION. 

The following statement shows the general progress of litigation 
during the fisciu year : 

Number of cases pending at beginning of year 7S 

Number of caaes mitiatea during tbe year 20 

Total ; n 

Namber of caaes disposed (rfdnring the year 30 

Nmnber of cases pending at the end of the year 7a 

IiBOISLATION. 

Copies of acts of Congress, passed dnring the fiscal year, affecting 
the Reclamation Service, will oe found in me appendix. 

LAW DECISIONS. 

A digest of law decisions affecting the Reclamation Service, which 
have l^n rendered during the fi3cal year, will be found in the ap- 
pendix. 

PXTBLIO NOTICES AND OBDERS. 

Copies of the public notices and orders issued by the Secretary in 
regard to reclamation payments, etc., during the fiscal year will be 
found in connection with the text relating to the respective projects. 

PUBCHASES OF BIGHTS AND PBOPEBTY. 

A statement of the transactions for the acquisition of rights and 
property is given in the appendix. 

PERSONNEL. 

On June 30, 1919, the force of the Reclamation Service comprised 
3,819 persons, subdivided as follows: Educational, 555; noneduca- 
tional, 951; laborers, 2,313. In addition, the employees of con- 
tractors working on reclamation projects numbered 112. A more 
detailed statement, giving the administrative personnel of the service 
and the number of employees by projects, classified as above, will be 
found in the appendix. 

Wages of labor, — A table in the appendix shows, by projects, the 
average dailv wages paid for common labor in June and December 
for the past nve years, and for June, 1919. As shown by this table, 
wages have increased from an average of about $2.23 in June, 1914, 
to $3.50 in June, 1919. ^ 

Injuries to employees. — ^Under the terms of the employees' com- 
pensation act of September 7, 1916, there have been 980 injuries 



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42 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RBCLABCATION SERVICB. 

reported from the date of the passage of the act to June 30, 1019. 
Claims to the number of 453 have been allowed, and a total of 
$40,040.57 has been paid to the claimants. A detailed statement, 
by projects, will be found in the appendix. 

inoculaiion with typhoid prophylactic and pneumonia and influenza 
vaccine. — ^During the fiscal year the service continued, in cooperation 
with the War Department, the use of typhoid prophylactic afiiiong 
the field force. Four hundred and thirtv complete treatments were 
sent to the field, making a total since July, 1912, of 3,980. Supplies 
of pneumonia and influenza vaccine were also sent to the projects 
on request. 

Employees in the military and naval service of the United States. — 
Employees of the Reclamation Service in the military and naval 
service of the United States during the war numbered 805. Of 
these, 7 were killed in action, 7 died of disease, 1 was reported miss- 
ing, and 6 were wounded. 

Liberty loans. — ^The employees of the service subscribed $169,450 
to the Victory Liberty loan, making a total subscription to the five 
loans of $917,850. In addition, large numbers of war-saving stamps 
have been purchased. 

FIVAirCES. 

The financial condition of the service may be summed up in the 
following condensed statement of total receipts and expenditures. 

The statement of cash receipts and payments appearing below 
shows that 

At the beginning of the fiscal year there was $1,680,589.05 cash 
on hand. 

During the year this amount was augmented by receipts from 
various sources to a grand total of $3,669,277.90. 

Cash expenditures during the fiscal year were $8,203,512.44. 

Town-site receipts were $55,362.49. 

The balance on hand at the close of the fiscal year amounted to 
$1^08,502.52. 

rursuant to Comptroller's decision of September 25, 1918, and 
Departmental approval of September 30, 1918, the General Land 
Office makes monthly statements of the amounts received from the 
sale of public lands and fees and commissions, from which the recla- 
mation fund is derived and 80 per cent of the total of this statement 
is immediately transferred to the credit of the reclamation fund, 
thus making these receipts available without waiting for the final 
audit of receivers' accounts. Under this plan the amounts held in 
the division of public moneys, pending audit, are reduced to an 
amount, which it is estimatea will be more than sufficient to cover 
repayments for lands erroneously sold and the 5 per cent State funds 
excepted by the act of June 17, 1902. Upon completion of audit, 
whicn is usually from six to nine months after the collection, the 
balance due the reclamation fund is made available. 

The reclamation fund has received from the sale of public lands 
a total of $97,426,574.56 and from the sale of town lots $449,516.42. 
Under the provisions of the reclamation act this is made a revolving 
fund, so that the return of any portion of the investment is made 
available for reinvestment in other operations. The reclamation 
fund, therefore, can be compared with capital invested in any busi- 



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FINANCES. 48 

iiess in commercial enterprises, and this authority to so use the fund 
makes possible the construction of works aggregating a cost greater 
tian the amount of the original investment. All appropriations by 
Congress for reclamation-fund projects have been practically author- 
ities for using the reclamation fimd, as the acts have specifically 
provided that the amount to be expended for the service as a whole 
IS limited to the available amoimt in the reclamation fund. It fol- 
lows that the construction of new works depends upon the repay- 
ment of the cost by the projects or units of projects wnich have been 
completed, as but little is being added to the fund from original 
sources. 

In all, 27 projects have been approved for construction, and on 19 
•of these public notices have been issued announcing the construction 
<5harges to be repaid by all or a portion of the area. Projects are 
sometimes opened by imits, and while construction is proceeding on 
uncompleted units repayments are being made on completed ones. 

The reclamation-extension act extended the time of repaying the 
cost of the works to a maximum of 20 years, in graduated payments, 
so the rate of turnover of capital is low, and without an increase in 
capital the progress of construction will be very slow. 

Transfer vouchers, adjusting accounts between the projects for the 
transfer of the value of services and equipment, amounted to $595,- 
509.40 during the fiscal year 1919. Since the beginning of the serv- 
ice the value of the transfers of supplies, materials, equipment, and 
services between projects has amounted to $7,270,806.72. This sys- 
tem of transfers between projects has enabled the service to utilize 
equipment, materials, supplies, etc., to their fullest extent where 
neeoed and to charge the cost where the benefit accrued. 

CASH TBANSACnONS. 

Below is shown, in the statement of cash receipts and payments, 
A summation of the cash transactions during the fiscal year 1919: 

^ABLE 1. — Statement of cash receipts and payments, reclamation fund, fiscal year 1919, 

RECEIPTS. 

■On hand July 1, 1918 (17th Ann. Rept., p. 40) $1,680,589.05 

Original reompts: 

PubUc land sales $3,613,916.41 

Town-sites sales : 55,362.49 

3,669,277.90 

Repayments water-right charges 2,632,721. 19 

Miscellaneous receipts: 

Sales 276,106.78 

Servloes 322,086.23 

Water rentals 527,261.73 

Power and I ight 143, 089. 95 

Transportation refunds 11,871.06 

Forfeitures by bidders 20.00 

Over disbursements 4, 450. 22 

'Colleetions in project office not classified 95, 862. 59 

Erroneous settlement by Treasury Department 327. 67 

9,363,644.37 
PAYMENTS. 

Reclamation fund 8, 203, 51 2. 44 

Town-site receipts 55,862.49 

Balance on hand June 30, 1919: 

In Treasury $460,308.55 

Deposits to credit of special fiscal agents 548, 193.97 

Project offices In process of deposit 95, 862.59 

Erroneous settlement by Treasury Department 404. 33 

1,104,769.44 

9,363,644.37 



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44 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 



ASSETS, LIABILITIBS, BBSBBVES, AND CAPITAL. 

Table 2. — Consolidated balance sheet, reclamation fund projects, June SO, 1919. 



195,862.59 
1,740,280.60 



56, 700, 994.56 



Collectians returnable to fund through Treasury 

Inventory of materials and supplies on hand 

Aoooimts receivable: 

Current accounts receivable 11,183,584.56 

Water-right charges unaccrued 55,636,409.99 

Construction work contracted 

Gross cost of construction 133,276,620.20 

Less revenues earned during construction 8,423,712.68 

Net cost of construction of projects 123,862,907.62 

Gross operation and maintenance cost 8, 509, 194. 27 

Less operation and maintenance revenue earnings 579, 403. 01 

Not oporatioo and maintenance cost 7,929, 791. 26 

Accounts payable 925, 164. 87 

Contingent obligations 384,085.27 

Collections and contracts for specific amounts for repayments to reclamation fund 70, 259, 057. 73 

Miscellaneous accruals 685,909.71 

Capital investment: 

DisbursementsandtransferandjolntcQDstiiietioDyooefaenreoeiyed.. t|153,816|788.83 

Less collectioos, refunds, and transfer and Joint ooostructioa vouchers 
issued 134,808,753.26 

Net investment 1 118, 422, 9«. 57 

OONSTBUOTION COSTS BY FBATTTBES. 

The statement which follows gives by features the cost of the con- 
struction of all storage works, canal systems, lateral systems, drain- 
age and other protection systems, power systems, and other construc- 
tion accounts of all projects, excluding the Blackfeet, Flathead, Fort 
Peck, and Riverton projects. 

Table ^,— Consolidated statement of construction costs and revenues. 



Feature. 



> Fiscal year 
1919. 



Examination and surveys 1340, 

Storage works 775, 

Pumping for irrigation 102, 

Canal system 2, 085, 

Lateral system i 971 , 

Drainage system 1 , 088, 



Flood protection. 

Power system 

Farm units 

Permanent improvements 

T elephone S3rstem 

Operation and maintenance during construction 

Operation and maintenance compounded wlt^ construction. 

Total co!»t of construction features 

Balance in plant accounts 

Unadjustea clearing accounts 



Gross construction cost.. 



RKVENTES. 

Rental of buildings 

Rental of grazing and farming lands 

Net power earnings (prior to public notice). 

Rental of Irrigation water 

Rental of telephone and tolls 

Contractors' freight refunds 

Other revenues, unclassified 

Hospital operations, profit and loss 

Railroad operations, profit anl loss 

Other operations, unclassified 



31 

49, 
54, 
30 
499, 
17, 



338.52 
343.42 
831.33 
400.30 
129.15 
250.06 
451.02 
311.98 
375.96 
278.65 
170.26 
088.05 
899.72 



6,053,868.42 



6,063,868.42 



16,921.81 

13,619.65 

259.92 

512,672.04 

45.40 

3,G23.51 

15,942.09 

« 13,027.86 

4,533.85 

02,949.96 



Oross revenues 1 616, 940. 37 



N'et cost of construction 5, 436, 928. 05 



To end of fiscal 
year 1919. 



13,607,280.01 

33,006,909.09 

1,324,909.09 

46,657,873.90 

20,170,506.38 

5,416,500.76 

2,883,401.15 

5,732,727.19 

506,905.88 

2,800,898.63 

490,020.77 

7,129,208.73 

227,096.22 



130,044,329.80 

1,917,517.72 

314,772.68 



132, 276, 62a 20 



252,997.96 

201,226.49 

1,037,050.33 

5,126,156.17 

7,463.00 

239,r.35.77 

1,553,426.37 

15,541.67 

3,900.21 

MO, 685. 39 



8,423,712.58 



123,8.'52,907.62 



» This statement was compiled from project balance sheets and does not contain i , 
Indian projects and some collections entered m Washington investment books which had not yet reache< 
Ihe project, explaining variance from Table 28, which includes all transactions in which the reclamati(ni 
fund projects were Involved. 

» Deduct. 



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FINANCES. 



45 



OPEBATINa COSTS AND BEVBNTJES. 

There follows a consolidated statement giving the costs and reve- 
nues for the operation of projects which have been opened by public 
notices of the Secretary of tne Interior. These costs and revenues 
are those resulting from operations connected with the lands thrown 
open to water-ri^t applicants by these public notices and do not 
include the transactions resulting from the temporary operation of 
canals during the construction period. 

Table 4. — Consolidated siatefment ofoperattng costs and reienues. 



Item. 



Storage works 

Pumping for irrigation 

Canal system 

Lateral s}r8tem 

Drainage system 

Flood protection 

Permanent improvements. . 

Farming operations 

MisceUaneous expense 



Opera- 
tion. 



|117,0&4.53 

25,397.88 

91,017.50 

263,766.36 

4,277.00 



73.06 
9,866.61; 



Total costs 

Less nnpaid operation 
and maintenance 
charges added to con- 
struction 



Balance. 



REVENUES. 

Operation and maintenance re- 
payments under contracts 
with water users: 

Accrued duurges , 

Advance payments 

Forfeitures 

Interest and penalties 

Water rentals 

Rentals of lands and buildines . 
Rentals of telephones and tolu . 
Other revenues, unclassifled.. . 
Discounts (deduct) 



Total revenues 

Difference— deficit . 



Calendar year 1918. 



To Dec. 31, 1918. 



Mainte- 
nance. 



$36,32S.36 

33,64L85 

M8,556.91 

658,006.71 

21,087.28 

65,789.31: 

7,866.02; 



Total. 



11^379.80, 1366,013.56 

47,939.731 276,147.17 

839,574.41 608,149.301 

920,775.0711,372,960.722; 

25,364.26 16,615.37 



67,244.43 



E9.31 

7,866.02 

73.08 

77,Ua04 



510,351.961,127,519.851,637,871.81 



2,689,707.33 



4,252.57 



,633,619.24 



140.67 
64,680.54 



Mainte- 
nance. 



991 
064; 



$188,280.37 

108,9n.66 

,896,049.^' 

944,899. 

88,064.27 

78,730.71 

24,237.02 

710.71 

218,336.36 



5,047,240.14 



Total. 



$564,288.98 
385,058.82 
,968,199.29 
1,317,860.78 
104,609.64 
78,730.71 
24,237.02 
85L38 
283,016.90 



7,736,947.47 



222,866.93 



7,514,080.54 



,'1,271,678.88 



3,918.86 
15,96L66 
36,230.96 
13,06L28 
66.12 

8,787.97 
17,084.63 



,333,304.38 



300,314.86 



,402,019.92 

7,762.33 

17,199.42 

44,066.97 

421,114.65 

60,287.05 

926.64 

31,074.36 

43,684.94 



5,940,786.40 



1,573,294.14 



REPAYMENT OONTBACTS. 

The development of the projects has resulted in water-right appli- 
cations or contracts that have been entered into with settlers, irriga- 
tion districts, and associations, providing for repavment to the Gov- 
ernment of the cost of constructing the worlra for irrigating their 
lands. These contracts, under provisions of the original reclama- 
tion law, and the reclamation extension act require complete repay- 
ment of construction charges in 10 and 20 annual installments, so 
graduated as to place upon the irrigator a minimum burden during 
the early years oi farm development. On 19 projects the lands have 
been opened to entry and settlement and the construction charges 
fixed by public notice. Contracts with water-right applicants Tor 



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46 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

repayment to the reclamation fund of the cost of projects total^ 
$63,535,281.58. Of this amount there has been collected $7,530,^ 
878.19 of the charges, leaving the unpaid value of these contracts on 
June 30, 1919, $56,004,403.39. 

The contract value referred to does not include the lands on com- 
pleted units which have not yet been specifically obligated by making 
water-right applications, and lands on uncompleted units oi projects 
for which construction charges have not been announced. The secur- 
ity for the return of the portion of cost allocated to these lands is the 
general contract executed with water users* associations or irrigation 
districts prior to commencement of construction, pledging the land 
benefited to return the cost. A considc/ablo portion of lands not 
contracted is public land on which the construction charge becomes 
a lien at time of entry. 

There are still large acreages of land on most of the projects to 
which the service is now ready to furnish irrigation water and which, 
are being taken up from day to day and new contracts signed. 
When all of the lands susceptible of irrigation are covered by con- 
tracts, the value of the contracts on any project should equal the^ 
amount of the net cost thereof. It is to be noted in this connec- 
tion, however, that on several of the projects additional investment 
will be necessary to make all of the lands irrigable. 

ESTIMATBD COST OF CONTEMPLATED WOBK. 

It is estimated that the cost of construction and operation and 
maintenance during the fiscal year 1920 will aggregate $6,424,761.21 
for all projects, including, in addition to reclamation-fund projects, 
the Blackfeet, Flathead, Fort Peck, and Riverton projects appropri- 
ated for in the Indian bill. The total appropriation for reclamation 
projects is $7,300,000 and for the Indian projects $725,000. Expend- 
itures for reclamation projects are limited to the amount available 
in the fund, which it is now estimated will be considerably l^s than 
the appropriation. The following table gives a tentative distribu- 
tion to the various functional features of the estimated cost of work 
during fiscal year 1920: 

Table 5. — Consolidated statement of estimated cost of contemplated work during fiscal 

year 1920, 

1. Examination and surveys $115, 509. 78 

2. Storage works 660,90a0O 

3. Pumping for irrigation 9, 500. 00 

4. Canal systems 1 , 205, 100. 00 

5. Lateral system 806,351.4a 

6. Drainage system 973, 700. 00 

7. FkxHl protection 12,200.00 

8. Povrer system 20, 000. OO 

9. Farm units 30,00a0O 

10. Permanent improvements ft5,700. 00 

11. Telephone systems 25,900.00 

12. Operation and maintenance during construction (water rental) 719, 200. 00 

13. Operation and maintenance under public notice 1,649,600.00 

14. Reimbursable accounts 57, lOa oa 

15. Secondary projects 75,000.00- 

TotaL 0,424,761.21 



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FINANCES. 47 

GENERAL FINANCIAL DATA FOB ALL PROJECTS. 

The following statement shows general financial data for all 
reclamation fmid projects: 

Tablb 6. — General finanddl data for all redanuUionfund projects. 

Net oonstruction cost to June 30. 1919 1123,352,907. 82 

A ppropriatioa for fiscal year 1920 7,300,000.00 

APPROPRIATION STATEMENT FOR FISCAL YEAR 1919. 

AjppropriatioD, fiscal year 1919 $9,445,000.00 • 

MisoelliEUieous ooUections and transfers issued by projects 1,363,750.93 

Increased compensation 324,955. 52 

Special appropriations 413,089.70 

Balance of fiscal year 1918 appropriation authorized for expenditure 995, 733. 80 

Total authorized for expenditure during fiscal year 1919 112, 542, 529. 95 

Disbursements 6, 702, 678. 60 

Transfers received by pro|lBcts 572,941. 62 

Current liabilities 708,694.41 

Contingent liabilities 90,143.99 

Total incumbrance, fiscal year 1919 8, 074, 358. 62 

Unencumbered balance of fimds authorized by appropriation act, fiscal year 

1919 4,468,171.33 

Note.— Expenditures under appropriations are limited to the amount in the reclamation fund for which 
reason full amounts authorized coula not be utilized. 



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48 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVKJK. 



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49 



COST OF INVBSTma tHE RECLAMATION FUND. 

In the thirteenth annual report there was for the first time pre- 
sented a statement of the general expenses by calendar years showing 
the gross expenditures and the ratio of the general expense thereto. 
The figures shown for general expense Were estimates based on partial 
returns from an investigation instituted to determine the ratio of 
^neral expense to all expenditures. Th^e accounts, as presented 
m the thirteenth annual report, had been kept by calendar years, 
but owing to the change of policy involving annual appropria- 
tions by fiscal years, a readjustment of these accounts was imme- 
diately undertaken. 

There is presented herewith a statement showing by fiscal years 
the gross cost from the reclamation f\md and the actual total amount 
of general expense, together with the ratio of general to total cost. 
The results snown by this table differ somewhat from those given 
in the table of estimates presented in the thirteenth annual report. 
By reference to the table which follows it will be found that the 
average cost of investing $100 in the constructiop and maintenance 
of the permanent works of the Reclamation Service has been $8.90 
during the past 17 fiscal years. 

Table 8. — Statement showing by fiscal years costs of all operalwns by the Redamatwn 
Service including general expense y the cost of general expense, and the ratio of general 
expense to all costs. 



Fiscal year. 


Cost. 


General ex- 
pense. 


Per cent. 


1907 


12 06.12 
i: 00.26 
11 37.05 

I 13.89 
1 54.59 

II 12.22 
1 16.74 

1 SI. 26 
li 17,09 


$1,762,686.75 

792,970.33 

887,484.08 

873,496.00 

897,501.27 

892,565.41 

958,443.72 

1,002,333.39 

1,058,809.24 

1, on, 486. 42 

1 080 303.78 

1,024,052.94 

862,046.74 


7.92 


1908.. 


6.25 


1909 


8.74 


1910 


7.59 


1911 


9.73 


1912 


8.38 


1918 


11.57 


1914 


8.54 


1915 


6.99 


1916 


1 83.12 

10.76 

1 91.65 

1 22.28 


12.88 


1917 


15.006 


1918 


12.66 


1919 


10.01 








Total... 


144,053,726.02 
2,318,666.65 


13,170,078.07 




Yahie of plant and equipment, clearing accounts, and general 
expADSft nndLstributfMi on June 30. 1919 










tititm xnA m^intfi^nfuji^ nnder piloHc noti<m 


146,372,392.67 


13,170,078.07 


8.9 







138554—19- 



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50 BIGHTEENTH ANNUAL BBPOBT OF BECLAMATION SBBVIOB. 
BB0BIPT8, BY STATUS. 

The table following gives a statement of additions to the reclama- 
tion fund from the sale of public lands, by States. 

Table 9. — Re^amationfund accretiomsfrom the $ale of public lands. 



state. 


Receipts from sales of pab> 
lie land, ezcIuslTe of 
town-«ite sales, trans- 
ferred to credit of recla- 
mation fund. 




^ir' 


Total to June 
80, 1919. 


Ailxona 


$107,010.94 

2U, 91.58 

WV4T5.82 

232,007.92 

12,312.48 

874,609.26 

77,462.16 

44,540.98 

255,504.47 

34,391.71 

23,236.97 

103,414.51 

103,241.91 

808,143.83 

84,460.78 

601,160.09 


$1,040,360.1^ 


OaUfomla 


«r596,553.87 


Colorado 


8,649,922.42 


T<^hA_ _,, 


6, 148, 867. 4S 


Kanms 


1,027,688.57 


Montana 


18,283,063.32 


Nebraska 


2i066,648.0<( 


Nevada 


735,868.14 


New Mexico 


4,909,752.98 


North Dakota 


12,185,912.05 


ov^homa 


5,891,097.1$ 


Oregon 


11,165.112.62 


South EhEtkota 


7,476,817.26 


Utah 


2,646,092.7s 


Washington 


7,106,147.45 


Wyomifig 


5,897,300.33 






Total 


3,613,915.41 


97, 426, 574. 5& 







NOTE.— On June 30, 1919, there was in the Treasurv the sum of $229,286.35 accrued to the credit of thfr 
reclamation fund but not transferred, making a total of $97,655,860.91, as per Ta4>le 10. 

BBOEIPTS, BY YEABS, FROM SALES OF PUBLIC LANDS. 

During the fiscal year 1918 the General Land Office collected from 
the sales of public lands, not including town-site sales, a total of 
$2,996,695.67^ which resulted in the ad£tion to the fund of $2,562,- 
660.65. Dunng the fiscal year 1919 the ctoss receipts were $2,449,- 
371.08. Of this amount $1,959,496.88 nas been credited to the 
reclamation fimd. 

The following table shows the gross receipts from the sale of public 
lands and the corresponding accruals to the reclamation fund by 
fiscal years since the passage of the reclamation law: 



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WSkBOBS. 



51 



Table 10. — Total receipts from the $(de of public lands and resulting accruals to the 

redamaUon fund. 



Fiscal year. 



1901. 
1002. 
1903. 
1904. 
W05. 
1906. 
1907. 
1006. 
1900. 
1910.. 
1911. 
1912. 
1913.. 
1914. 
1915.. 
1910.. 
1917. . 
1918.. 
1919. . 



Total 108,433,020.94 



Total receipts 
from sale of 
public lands in 
reclamation 
States (not in- 
cluding town- 
site sales). 



13,611 
5,11; 
9,39 
7,60 
5,32 
6,73; 
8,47 

10,23. 
8,39 
7,671 
6,03 
6,32 
4,20 
4,05J 
3,711 
3,181 
3,291 
2,901 
2,441 



61 



Accruals to the reclama- 
tion fund. 



Amount (not Per cent of 

including I total r^ 
town-site sales).! oeipts. 



Total re- - 
oeipts from 
sale of town 

lots in 
reclamation 

States. 



21.91 i 
a).53 I 
W.60 
S3.5e I 
L5.39 
56.50 
J1.71 
73.98 I 
36.81 , 
85.73 i 
17. 76 
)8.88 I 
10.55 I 
SI. 63 I 
57.73 I 
57. 74 
».34 
50.65 
)6.88 



86.908 
89.637 
92.744 
80.748 
90.192 
90.122 
93.417 
92. 137 
92.415 
91.521 
92.528 
89.460 
88.935 
85.229 
87,856 
83.109 
87.076 
86.113 
80.000 



97,655,860.91 I 



90.006 



161,535.00 
12,864.06 
10,017.85 
60,112.86 
60,468.80 
15,224.10 
17,784.74 
15,280.25 
18,436.28 
21,189.28 
31, 250. 15 
60,990.56 
55,362.49 



449,516.42 



None.— This table differs from Table 9 in that it covers Land .Office transactions in the various fiscal 
jeare, while Table 9 shows transfSers to reclamation fund within the fiscal year, regardless of when collections 
were made by Land Office. 

ALLOTMENTS AND GROSS COSTS, BY PBOJEOTS AND BY STATES. 

This statement shows, by projects and by States, the amount of 
money allotted and the gross construction and operation and mainte- 
nance cost to June 30, 1919. 

Table 11. — Statement of allotments and gross costs, by projects and by States, to June 

30, 1919. 



State and project. 



Arizona: 

Salt River 

Yuma 

Colorado River 

Colorado River Bashi 

Little Colorado 

San Carlos 

San Pedro 

Arizona cooperative 

Preliminary investigation. 



ToUl.. 



Calilbmla: 

Yuma 

Orland 

iOamath 

Colorado River 

Colorado River Basin 

Iron Canyon 

Pitt River 

Shasta County 

Lassen County 

Owens Valley 

Sacramento Valley 

San Joaquin 

Imperial Valley 

Kin^ River storage 

San Luis Rey 

Prdiminary investigation. 



Total.. 



Allotments. 



Fiscal year 
1919. 



To June 30, 
1919. 



23,28L50 



i $14,929,204.87 

1395,495.00 1 8,913,142.73 

36,279.30 

128,953.23 
9,554.33 
24,829.51 
2,427.34 
3,501.22 
39,578.78 



418,776.50 



81,005.00 
63,650.00 
38,375.00 



4,768.50 
10,000.00 



24,087,471.31 



1,825, 

1, 174 

873, 

«; 

19, 
2, 
2, 
5, 
12, 
43, 
3, 
5, 



583.45 
364.26 
073.04 
430.70 
412. U 
185.96 
500.00 
500.00 
000.00 
061.92 
620.72 
531.20 
5.''0.00 



Gross cost, construction, and 
operation and maintenance. 



Fiscal year 
1919. 



$327,258.59 



22,773.41 



350,032.00 



67,028.87 
59,140.52 
31,368.14 



4,664.44 
3, .325. 05 



152.62 



700.00 I 



700.00 
7,952.48 |. 



198,498.50 



4,010,234.44 



166,386.05 



To June 30, 
1919. 



115,106,942.10 

8,362,544.56 

36,279.30 

136,438.51 

9,554.33 

24,829.51 

2,427.34 

3,536.33 

39,-578.78 

23,722,130.76 



1,712,810.33 

1,125,810.58 

849,239.20 

7,430.70 

27,945.24 

22,058.88 

2,499.18 

2,297.37 

1,945.60 

12,061.92 

43,620.72 

3,531.20 

4,337.85 

1, 157. 70 

706.41 

7,952.48 

3, 825, 405. .36 



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62 



EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 



Table 11. — Statement of allotments and gross costs^ by projects and by States, to June 

SO, 1919— Gonixnued. 



AUotments. 



Stnte and project. 



Colorado: 

Grand V'aliey 

Uncompahgro 

White River 

San Luis ValJcy 

Preliminary investigation . 



Fiscal year 
1919. 



»323,000.00 
1H4,700.00 



5,000.00 



To June 30, 
1919. 



Gross cost, construction, and 
operation and maintenance. 



$3,876,332.24 

7,644,087.71 

4,357.00 

5,000.00 

3, 718. 75 



Total.. 



512,700.00 i 11,533,495.70 



545,000.00 
471,500.00 ' 
307,000.00 



Idaho: 

Boise 

KingHiU 

Minidoka 

Dubois 

Island Park 

Port Neuf. 

Snake River Basin 

Swan Valley 

General investigation 

Total i 1,343,500.00 

Kansas: Garden Citv.. 



20,000.00 I 



Montana: 

Huntley 

Milk River 

Milk River, St. Mary storage. 

Sun River 

Lower Yellowstone 

Clark Fork 

Crow Reservatfon 

Lake Basin 

Madison River 

Marias 



Total.. 



Nebraska: 

North Platti' 

Nebraska investigation. . . 
North Platte cooperative. 
South Platte 



Total.. 



Nevada: 

Newlands 

Walker River 

Walker River investigation., 



TotaL. 



New Mexico: 

Carlsbad 

Hondo 

Rio Grande 

La Plata 

Las Vegas 

UrtonLake 

Preliminary investigation. 



Total.. 



.North Dakota: 

North Dakota pumping. . . 

Lower YellowsM>ne 

Bismarck 

Little Missouri 

Nesson 

Washburn 

'Bowman , 

Preliminary investigation . 



Total., 



89,600.00 
151,900.00 
101,500.00 
.357,178.79 

73,500.00 



14.696,009.70 

712,172.05 

7,628,329.14 

17,228.91 

7,100.00 

2,168.01 

20,000.00 

544.48 

4,000.00 



Fiscal year 
1919. 



1267,712.13 
178,863.94 



4,214.75 



450,790.82 



23,087,562.29 



407,377.27 



773,678.79 



713,492.97 
2,' 450. 66 



2,347,305.58 

3,557,539.79 

2,846,833.21 

4,188,038.78 

2,556,009.23 

5.581.23 

18,911.96 

7,103.26 

10,720.09 

13,459.01 



15,549,571.14 



8,650,496.70 
10,000.00 
2,870.00 
2,877.01 



15,942.97 ' 8,666,243.71 



308,000.00 



308,000.00 



53,000.00 
'867,'666.66' 



7,326,366.48 
12,503.63 
4,000.00 



7,342,870.11 



860,600.00 



1,721,8U.55 
407,742.36 
5,934,23L62 
28,064.33 
5,014.09 
17,464.70 
2,738.91 



73,800.00 
31,500.00 



8,117,067.56 



566,942.04 
372,458.61 
235, 717. 15 



1,602.34 
"24,'775.'82 



1,201,495.96 



. 89,241.97 
157,757.61 
122,376.92 
,i51,373.27 
63,414.73 



»5.15 



784,159.25 



82f,173.91 
'2,'426.'86 



823,594.71 



258,819.82 



258,819.82 



51,669.35 
"877,'ii5.'e6* 



928,784.95 



1,392,153.14 
1,095,458.24 
13,621.69 
11,933.52 
17,471.83 
10,631.53 
3,236.64 
4,961.03 



104,800.00 



2.549,367.62 



8,091.98 
27, 177. 74 



^60.81 



35,218.91 



To June 30, 
1919. 



$3,545,157.26 

7,341,65L04 

4,357.00 

4,214.75 

3,718.75 



10,899,099.40 



13,186,498.33 

591,362.37 

6,915.622.64 

17)252. 06 

4,767.88 

2,168.01 

24,775.82 

544.88 

1,19L78 



20,744,183.77 



391,604.30 



2,094,65L60 

3,384,147.37 

2,571,327.30 

3,903,510.60 

2,496,297.28 

5,581.23 

18,911.96 

7,103.26 

10,729.09 

13.538.00 



14,505,798.29 



8,155,004.57 
3,381.70 
2,883.85 
2,877.01 



8, 164, 147. 13 



7,016,144.82 
12,503.63 
1,192.74 



7,029,84L19 



1,669,303.26 
381,573.39 
5,866,177.82 
28,064.33 
5,014.09 
17,464.70 
2,738.91 



7,969,336.49 



993,440.90 
l,060,84Le9 
18,631.09 
11,983.63 
17,471.88 
10,682.78 
4.036.03 
4,961.08 



2,125,828.43 



1 Deduct. 



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FINANCES. 



53 



Table M.— Statement of allotments and gross costs ^ by projects and by States y to June 

SO, ^^/^— Continued. 



Allotments. 



Gross cost, construction, and 
operation and maintenance. 



^nate and project. 



Fiscal year 
1919. 



, To June 30, 
I 1919. 



OkltthoDUi: 

Lawton 

Cimanvn 

Red River.... 
Turkey Creek. 
Investigation.. 



$500.00 



Total.. 



Oregon: 

Umatilla 

Klamath 

Central Oieffon 

Columbia River cooperative. . 
litOlieur.. 



500.00 



il3.<HX>.00 
US 125.00 



Oregon oooperative. . 
Teeldist ' 



Idistrict.. 



investigation. 



1,250.00 



Total.. 



South Dakota: 

Amrastura 

BeueFoarche 

Preliminary investigation . 



229,375.00 



4oaoo 

92,856.00 



Total.. 



93,256.00 



Texas: 

RloGraade .... 

Pecos River investigation . 



539,400.00 



Total.. 



588,400.00 



102,000.81 j 

8,891.17 

60,200.27 

187.80 

400.00 



132,328.05 



2,994,888.70 

2,019,219.09 

40,3^6.41 

20,012.47 

83,490.62 

53,261.49 

500.00 

1,250.00 

943.79 



5,813,912.57 



7,500.00 

4,143,410.61 

16,818.04 



4,167,728.65 



3,966,154.41 
9|50O.0O 



3,964,064.41 



Utah: 

StrawbewyVaUey.... 

Bear Lake 

Mammoth Reservoir. . 

Utah Lake «.. 

Provo-Weber 

General investigation. . 



Total... 

Washington: 
Okanogan 
Takima.. 
Benton... 
Kittitas.. 
Wapato.. 
Pakmae.. 



85,000.00 4,182,564.46 

18,827.72 

, 500.00 

34,049.30 

! 141.85 

6,500.00 I 9,450.00 



91; 500. 00 

154,000.00 
640,5Qp.pO 



Patouse oooperative 

Priest Rapids 

PreiimJnary investigation . 

Total 



794,500.00 



Wyomix«: 

Nortfi Platte 

Shoslunie 

DeSmet 

Wyoming oooperative 

Pathfinder pumping... 

Riverton. 

North Platte cooperative. . . . 
Jackson Lake enlargement. 



4,215,582.83 

1,184,506.89 
13,245,136.02 
11,106.06 
19,408.50 
36,465.77 
76,409.01 
12,966.56 
6,216.01 
3,776.96 



14,596,961.76 



Total.. 



305,782.70 I 
607,664.67 



1,050.00 I 



3,707,355.73 

6,759,406.44 

8,917.38 

808.15 

2,360.00 

8,300.00 

1,230.00 

850,937.54 



914,497.37 



Genefal accounts undistributed. 
General investigations 



Total 

Grand total. 



33,350.00 



33,850.00 
7,931,874.13 



11,339,315.24 



41,200.00 



41,200.00 
140,651,904.66 



Fiscal year 
1919. 



$99.69 



To June 30, 
1919. 



$13,907.61 
8,891.17 

60,209.27 
137.80 
400.00 



99.69 



88,545.35 



184,291.86 I 
94,104.41 ! 



1,864.62 i 



2,860,801.77 

2,547,717.62 

40,846.41 

17,008.51 

83,490.62 

49,994.88 

456.35 

1,364.62 

943.79 



279,760.80 



414.56 I 
82,928.85 



83,848.41 



584,743.74 



584,743.74 



68,600.43 



6,308.49 



74,908.92 

99,487.07 
706,670.85 



> 41.60 



806,065.82 



351,961.67 
684,496.44 



1,037.49 



987,465.60 



32,189.67 



32,189.67 
7,847,859.71 



5,601,637.52 



6,874.81 

4,033,068.86 

16,818.04 



4,056, 76L 21 



8,910,118.54 
7,118.87 



3,917,281.91 



8,609,215.44 

18,827.72 

404.27 

34,049.80 

14L85 

9,080.38 



8,671,677.46 

1,104,361.96 
12,001,102.58 
11,167.45 
19,366.90 
36,465.77 
76,409.01 
10,201.92 
6,216.01 
3,776.91 



13,269,068.52 



8,496,00L96 
6,422,663.82 
8,917.38 
3,68L76 
1,554.96 
7,090.11 
1,285.71 
788,168,87 



10,728,299.07 



45,687.02 
89,54L40 



85,228.42 
140,785,814.47 



iDedQOt 



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54 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 



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6€ BIGHTBBNTH AIJNUAL BBPOBIT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

BBOONCILINa ADIONISTBATIVB AOCOXTNTS WITH TBBAfiTdBY 
DEPABTMBITT BALANCES AND STATEMENTS. 

The accounts of the Treasury Department are limited to the move- 
ment of cash, either bjr withdrawal or deposit to the appropriations 
involved. Tne administrative accounts of the Reclamation Service, 
as entered in the table herein, show the amount, both for receipts 
and disbursements, upon an accrual basis. The cash accoimt, how- 
ever, must, if correct, a^ee with the Treasury Department statement 
of funds made available dv appropriations, reimbursements, expendi- 
tures, and withdrawals. Table 13, below, shows a condensed state- 
ment o£ cash collected, appropriated, disbursed, and on hand, and 
Table 14 gives a reconciliation of the amounts of the appropriations, 
withdrawals, and balances used in the preparation of these financial 
tables, with the figures shown by the statements of the Treasury 
Department. 

Table 13. — Reclamation fund account to June 30, 1919. 



Item. 



Debit. 



Total, end of fiscal yearas per Seventeenth Annual Report, Table 12, p. fiO. 

Receipts during; fiscal year 1919: 
.Vppropriation warrant- 
No. 9, July 13, 1918 $422, 105. 56 

No. W, Aup. 28, 1918 385, 573. 45 

No. 19a, Sept. 30, 1918 18, 188. 93 

No. 20, Oct. 11,1918 1,076,025.88 | 

No.25,Nov. 16,1918 448,984.50 ; 

No. 29, Dec. 31 , 1918 19, 148. 60 ! 

No. 32, Jan. 18. 1919 297,928.74 ' 

No. 35, Feb. 17, 1919 148,114.TO 

No. 37, Bfar. 8, 1919 147,126.58 

No. 43, Mar. 31. 1919 11,072.8? 

No. 46, Apr. 7, 1919 137,324.46 

No. 48, May 16, 1919 161, 863. 04 

No. 52, June 9, 1919 200, 732. 79 

No. 54, June 30, 1919 188, L35. 43 

Do 6.952.13 



Credit. 



|M,206,S13.o^ 



Special reclamation fund, reimbursable, act of Jime 25. 
1910 (36 Stat., 836) 



Total 

DisbursemeDt5. 467,983 vouchers, as per Table 16 

Collection vouchers, as per Table 16 

Balance with Treasurer United States, as per Table 14 . 

Balance with special fiscal agents 

Town^te collections credited to reclamation fund 

Erroneous settlement by Treasury' Department 



Sl44,8a0,091.31 



Total 146,278,110.25 146,378,110.25 



460,322.91 
648,179.61 
449,516.42 



3,660,277.90 
20,000,000.00 



n7,876,000.9S 



28,401,601.60 



327.67 



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msAsasA, 



57 



Tablb l4,^Balanee of redamation fund ioith Treasurer of the United States, June SO, 

1919. 



Item. 



Total and balance, end of fiscal year 1918, as per Seventeenth 

AnnnalRer""" --^^ — 

Reclamation 



Anmial Report. Table 13, p. 50. 
nnina 



1114,200,813.08 11113,280,722.75 
3,609,277.90 4,175,273.68 



Total and balance as per statement of Treamry De- 
partment 

For items in Reclamation Service accounts, but 
not included in above, add withdrawals on 

direct settlement by auditor and advances S-U, 329. 19 

Deduct repayments on direct settlements and re- 
payment acpoimts 71,543. 19 



Total. 



Appropriation. Withdrawals. 



117,876,090.98 117,455,996.43 



117,876,090.98 



40,228.36 



Balance. 



1926,090.33 
1505,995.78 



1 Deduct. 
Tablb 15. — DisbursemerU vouchers paid to June SO, 1919, 



420,094.55 



40,228.36 



117,415,778.07 460,322.91 



Fiscal year. 


Quartor 
ended- 


Number 

of 
vouchers. 


Amount. 


Balance from Seventeenth Annual Report, Table 14, p. 50 




439,392 


1136,616,578.87 




(Sept. 30,1918 
Dec. 31,1918 
Mar. 31,1919 
June 30,1919 


1919 


7,510 
7,292 
7,099 
6,600 


2,243,258.98 
2,101,811.68 




2,007,089.83 
1,851,367.95 


Subtotal for 1919 


28,691 


8,203,512.44 






Total to June 30, 1919 


467,983 


144,820,091.31 







Tablb U,— Collection vouchers to June SO, 1919, 




Fiscal year. 


Quarter 
ended- 


Number 

of 
vouchers. 

212,716 


Amount. 


Balance from Seventeenth Annual Renort. Table 15. d. 51 . . . 




t24,484,104.44 




f Sept. 30,1918 

. Deo. 31,1918 

Mar. 31,1919 

June 30,1919 


1019 


3,232 
9,237 
14,871 
11,098 


553,762.58 
1,076,283.18 




1,381,825.49 
905,715.91 


Subtotal for 1919 


37,938 


3,917,587.16 






Total to June 30, 1919 


260, 6M 


28,401,601.60 







Table 17. — Transfer vouchers approved to June SO, 1919. 



Fiscal year. 



Balance flrom Seventeenth Annual Report, Table 16, p. 51. 



1919. 



Subtotal for 1919 

Total to June 30, 1919. 



Quarter 
ended— 



Sept. 30,1918 
Dec. 31,1918 
Mar. 31,1919 
June 30,1919 



I 



Number 

of 
vouchers. 



11,810 



145 
184 
172 



759 



12,569 



Amount. 



16,675,297.32 



175,464.21 
121,922.21 
146,377.02 
151,745.96 



595,509.40 



7,270,806.72 



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58 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 
INVESTKENT OF THB T7NITED STATES IN PROJECTS. 

Below is given a statement showing cash disbursed and received on 
account of the several projects and transfers between projects. The 
work of the service is grouped under four general heads, as follows: 
Primary projects, those for which specific appropriations of funds are 
in effect and on which construction is under way; secondary projects, 
those for which general appropriations of funds have been made for 
all such work as a whole and on which only preliminary studies and 
surveys have been made to determine then* advisability and practi- 
cability; Indian irrigation projects; and general accounts, which 
represent those expenditures that are general in nature and are not 
directly chargeable to anv project when first inctirred, but which 
become a charge against aU projects as a part of the general or over- 
head expenses of tne service. 

Table 18 gives the voucher transactions and net investments of the 
United States on the several primary projects as of June 30, 1919- 
Table 19 gives the voucher transactions on secondary projects; ana 
Table 20 gives the voucher transactions and net investment of the 
United States on Indian irrigation projects and miscellaneous as of 
June 30, 1919. 

Table 22 shows the amount invested from the appropriation for 
increase in compensation for the fiscal year 1918 and 1919. 



Digitized by 



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FINAKCES. 



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082.26 
586.16 
453.62 

566.90 
860.70 


723.47 
888.30 
788.21 
291.22 


309.42 
428.96 
907.46 
807.08 


m 


sas 
i2S 


487.84 
334.84 
604.11 
&18.29 
708.93 
942.85 


gS3 


14,238 
10,105 
1,075 

3,442 
7,262 




2,195 
3,256 
2,445 
3 804 


2gS 




1,164 

2,827 
3,326 
3,9T7 
3,748 





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60 



EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL BBPORT OF RECLAMATION SEBVIGB. 



Table Xo. 19. — Voucher ^ansadion and net investment of the United StaUi on secondary 

projects as of June SO, 1919, 



Debits. 



state and project. 



Disbtmement vouchers. Transfers recetved. 



132.20 



26,231.85 



1,4«7.18 



152. «2 



601.52 



1,751.23 



8,063.75 
118.67 



J. 



Fiscal yei 
1919. 



Arizona: 

Little Colorado 

San Carlos 

San Pelro 

Arixona well lii ling 

Arisona-Califomia: 

Colorado River 

Colorado River Basin 

California: 

O wens Valley 

Sacramento Valley 

San Joaquin 

Iron Canyon cooperative 

Pit River cooperative 

Shasta County cooperati -e 

Lassen County cooperati e 

Imperial Valley 

KinES Riverstorage 

San Luis Rey 

Colorado: White River 

Idaho: 

Dubois 

Island Park 

PortNeuf. 

General Investigations 

Swan Valley 

Snake Ri^er Basin 

Powder River 

Montana: 

Clark Pork 

Crow Reservation 

Lake Basin ' 

Madison River 

Marias , 

Nebraska: 

South PUtto t 

Nebraska investigations * 

North Platte cooperative | 3,594. 76 

Pathfinder pumping 

Nevada: Walker River I 

New Mexico: I 

La Plata I 

Las Vegas ' 

Urton Lake 

San Luis Valley 3 , 581 . 06 

North Dakota: I 

Bismarck ' 

Little Missouri i 

Nesson 

Washbiun 

Bowman 

Oklahoma: 

Cimarron 

Red River 

Oklahoma reconnolssanee 

Turkey Creek 

Oregon: 

. Malheur 

Central Oregon 

Columbia River cooperati vo 

Oregon cooperative 

Owyhee 966.86 

Teel district 

South Dakota: Angostura 396.68 

Texas: Pecos River survey 

Utah: 

Bear Lake 

Mammoth Reservoir ' 

Utah Lake i 

Provo- Weber 

General lnvestlgatioa<t I 5,856.71 



To June 80, Fiscal year To June 30, 
1919. ' 1919. I 1919. 



$9,515.33 
24,589.74 
2,423.72 
3,443.72 

42,235.20 
140,683.08 

. 26,048.91 

52,808.13 

3,513.92 

16,667.23 

2,258.17 

4,558.41 

2,398.88 

3,512.62 

768.60 

691.52 

4,848.01 

21,464.03 

5,053.06 

2,165.77 

496.55 

544.48 

«,063.75 

118.67 

5,417.71 
21,020.47 

7,044.39 
10,796.45 
14,068.96 

1,918.96 
3,350.94 
3,866.96 
1,554.96 
13,643.22 

20,598.20 
5,012.16 

19,33a 65 
3,531.06 

16,709.04 
11,665.59 . 
7,49L51 
9,951.90 . 
3,654.96 . 

8,726.96 
59,413.75 . 
400.00 . 
137.30 . 

82,592.87 . 

43,014.03 . 

14,996.05 . 

46,797.43 . 
966.36 



6,522.41 
7,498.21 

18,850.06 
184.60 

84,044.67 , 
141.35 , 
7.491.33 



$7,487.15 



776.07 



14.80 



639.27 



134.50 



15,881.66 



171.72 



327.91 



250.00 



3X13 



1.348.89 



$40.00 

252.67 

3.97 

60.00 

7,160.38 
23,488.90 

80.00 

2,748.07 

17.48 

4,977.62 

241.01 

188.96 

46.72 

825.28 

380.10 

14.80 

9.11 

858.13 

2,675.72 

2.24 

695.23 

.40 

15,881.66 



438.67 
5.01 
79.87 
2.57 

116.71 

963.06 
42.76 
174.82 



58.15 

168.56 

2.28 

278.71 

•327.91 

26.66 

1,700.00 

20,786.35 

1,973.89 

1,512.97 

321.76 
1,902.64 



4,312.28 

1,767.04 

7,0iai8 

11,691.10 

250.00 

456.85 

684.02 

871.29 

3a 72 
219.67 

a2& 



1,474.59 



» Deduct. 



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KlNANCfiS. 



61 



Tablb No. 19.— Voucher traiuaction and net investment of the United States on secondary 
projects as of June SO, 1919 — Continued. 



Debits. 



state and project. 



Dlsbonement vouchers. 



Transfers received. 



Fiscalyear. ToJtmea 
1919. I 1919. 



Fiscal year i To Jane 30, 
1919. I 1919. 



Washington: i 

BOTton $11,167.45 



Kittitas 








19,408.50 
36,445.06 
76,806.20 
9,394.00 
6,218.98 

9,063.32 
3.177.31 









Wapato 




$20.71 


Palouse ' . 






130. 19 


Palouse cooperative . . 






3,164.48 






247.58 


Wyoming: 

DeSmet - 






2.51 


Wyoming cooperative 

^'^eneral recormoJflSAncPr 






529.20 


19,268.78 1 15;211.09. 
35,949.02 1 41.07L37 


"isimsi* 


1,077.10 
6,812.15 










Total 


Crod 


98,067.39 


1,136,736.27 


32,536.70 


141,279.21 


State and project. 


' 


Uts. 


Net invesfe 
United 


nent of the 


Collection vouchers. 


Transfers issued* 


States. 


Fiscal 
year 1919. 


To June 
30, 1919. 


Fiscal 
year 1919 


- 


To June 
30, 1919. 


Fiscal 
year 1919. 


To June 
30. 1919. 


AriEona: 

Little Colorado 


ILOO 

1X90 

.35 

1,91Z71 

760.32 
1,083.92 

14,016.99 




$0,654.33 


San Carlos ' 








24.829.51 


SftP Pedro ..... x . ' 








2.4!fi7.34 


Aricona-CaUfomia:" 

Colorado River 






> $434. 50 


1,59L01 




$4,925.26 
6,959.79 


43.7ia00 


Ctrforado River Basin 534. 28 

Oalifomia: 

Owens Valley 


|2,85Z45 


166,178.27 
12,06L92 


Saoramcnto VfJiey . ..... 


91.79 

.20 

15,477.89 




11,843.89 




43,62a 72 


flan Joaanin . , r . . . ' 






3,53L20 


Iron Cfunyon cooperative . . 3, 681. 32 




540.96 


13,438.07 


5,626.50 


Pit River co<^>erative 




2,499.18 


Shasta County cooperative 
Lassen Coonty cooperative 
Imperial Valley 




2,450.00 

5oaoo 

1,464.21 






l.'>2.62 


2,297.37 








1,946.60 


1.464.21 






11,464.21 


2,873.64 


Kipw River Storage , . ... 






1,157.70 


Sftfi t/uis Rey .....". 








706.41 


706.41 


(olorado: White River 


.15 

L81 
3.15 






4,357.00 


Idaho: 

Dubois 




5,068.29 
3,110.63 




17,252.06 


Island Parle 


3.15 


733.20 


1,664.15 


4,614.99 


PortNeof. 


2,168.01 


General investigations 












1,19L78 


Swan Valley .77. 












544.88 


Snake River Basin 


.15 


.15 






23,94i36 
118.67 


23,945.26 


Powdw River 






118.67 


Montana: 

Clark Fork 




.25 




269.90 


5.58L23 


Crow Reservation 




LOO 




2,120.62 
2L00 
67.08 
632.20 




18,91L96 


Lake Basin 








7,108.26 


Madison River 




L85 
7,218.55 






10,729.09 


Marias 


3,030.44 




13,630.44 


6,329.92 


Nebraska: 

South Platte 






.. 2,877.01 


Nebraska investigations. . . 








i2.66 
2.28 




3,38L70 


North Plirfte cooperative. . 






i'28" 


3,764.20 


4,039.00 








1,564.96 


Nevada: Walker RiverT 












13,696.37 


New Mexico: 

La Plata.... 




1,702.42 

.30 

1,225.51 








28,061.33 


Las Vegas 










5,014.09 


UrtonLake 






914. 15 
162.45 


'"3'696.'62' 


17,464.70 


San Luis Vallev 




162.41 


5 


3.096.52 



I Deduct. 



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62 



EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPOKT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 



Table No. 19. — Voucher traiuacUon and net investment of the United States on secondary 
projects as of June SO, iPiP— Continued. 





Credits. 


Net bivesti 
United 


tnent of the 


state and pFoJeot. 


Coflectlon vouchers. 


Transfers-issued. 


States. 




Fiscal 
year 1919. 


To June 
80, 1919. 

$14. 70 

1.25 

1.14 

42.38 

2,841.95 


Fiscal 
year 1919. 


To June 
30, 1919. 


Fiscal 
year 1919. 


To June 
30, 1919. 


North Dakota: 

Bismarck 


13,099.34 
1439.82 

19,80L80 
1,350.68 
1,136.09 

• 156.55 
945.35 




|13Jg.6» 


Little Missouri 








Nesson 








17,471.83 


^Va'dibum 






*"»'i723.'i5* 


10,632.7$ 


Bowman 


$678.15 


945.00 


1,189.89 


Oklahoma: 

Cimarron 


8,89L17 


Red River 




161.77 






60,209.27 


Oklahoma reconnoissance. 








4oaoo- 


Turkey Creek 












137.8a 


Oreeon: 

Malheur 




279.80 
1,353.58 

218.12 
15,410.06 




3,134.78 
3,08L08 

4,779.60 
18,164.01 




83, 49a 62^ 


Central Or^on. 








40,346.41 


Columbia River coopera- 
tive !?.... 




'16*556.' 62' 


'i'26;773.'28" 
1,216.36 


17,008.51 


Oregon cooperative 

Owyhee 


10,216.76 


24,914.45 
1.216.36- 


Teel district 










456.35 


South Dakota: Angostura 


642.40 
1,306.90 


3,775.70 
2,821.95 

62.06 




334.31 
782.00 


213.59 
1,306.90 


3,096.42 


Texas: Pecos River survey 




4.765. 5& 


Utah: 

Bear Lake 




18,827.72 


Mammoth Reservoir 










404.27 


Utah Lake 




4.62 








34,049.80* 


Provo-WebCT 








141. 3& 


General Investigations 

Washington: 

, Beaton 


999.45 


999.45 

156.00 
2.273.65 


jao7 


3a 07 


6,176.08 


7,936.40 
11,01L4& 


Kittitas 


1,458.67 






U,458.67 


17,134.8* 


Wapato 






36,465.77 


Palouse 


2, 33a 09 


4,128w52 

24.77 

25a 55 

39.55 

24,75 

16,168.55 

.5, SOL 85 




4oaoo 

2,33L79 


12,330.09 


72,406.87 


Palouse cooperative 




10,201.92 


Priest Rapids 








6,216.01 


Wyoming: 

De Smet 






98.90 




8,917.38 


Wyoming cooperative 








3,68L7& 


Rlvorton. . . 


9,489.90 
r 5,50L85 


"i6,'695.'69* 


80.04 
10,617.49 


1226.12 
25,458.09 


39.60 


General reconnoissance 


31,798.68 


Total 


44,404.42 


104,437.54 


24,977.06 


107,414.04 


61,221.61 


1,066,102.90 







» Deduct. 



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nSASOBS. 



63 



Table 20. — Voucher traruaetions and net investment from the reclamation fund on 
Indian irrigation and miecellaneous a$ of June 30 ^ 1919, 





Debits. 


Item. 


Disborsement voochers. 


Transfers reoeiyed. 




Fiscalyear 
1919. 


To June 30, 
1919. 


Fiscalyear 
19Wr. 


To June 30, 
1919. 


Indian irrigation: 

Blaokfeet prtrieot 


172.87 
1,393.46 


1926,221.94 

1,542,342.79 

440,664.24 




S109.379.18 


Flathead wcdect 




86,547.60 


Fort Peck'prt^eot 




40,897.01 










Total 


1,466.33 


2,909,228.97 




235,823.69 








MisceUaneoas: 

General expense 


601,564.07 


4,745,970.51 


$21,680.88 


215,768.87 


Preliminary investigations . . . ^ 


80,488.73 


Jaokffon t^kWe enlargement .................... .. 




741,636.20 


5,478.99 


109,301.34 








Total 


601,564.07 


5,487,606.71 


27,159.82 


405,558.94 







Item. 


Cre< 
CoUection youohers. 


lits. 

Transfers issued. 


Net investment. 




Fiscalyear 
1919. 


To June 30, 
1919. 




To June 30, Fiscal year 
1919. 1919. 


To June 30, 
1919. 


Indian irrigation: 

Blaokfeet prqiect 

Fort Peck' project.....* 


1261.48 
236.00 
126.51 


1951,160.63 

1,681,311.96 

465,372.65 


•••• 


1 

$84,440,49 1 1 $178. 61 
46,694.33 1 1,157.46 
16,188.60 112A.S1 




>$16.00 














Total 


613.99 


2,997,845.24 




147,223.42 


852.34 


1 16.00 








Miscellaneous: 

General expense 

PreUminary Inyesti- 
gation 


57,218.99 


215,159.83 


1455,169.08 


4,653,171.90 


10,846.83 


98,407.65 
80,488.73 


Jackson Lake enlarge- 
ment 


629.58 


843,848.19 


1,520.07 


12,868.25 


3,329.34 


15,768.90 






Total 


57,848.57 


1,060,006.02 


456,680.15 


4,666,030.15 


14,176.17 


168,122.48 







1 Deduct. 



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64 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL. BfiPOBT OF RECLAMATION SERVIOE. 

Tab LB 21. — Recapitulation of voucher transactionB and all net investmente of the 
United States from the reclamation fund as of June SOy 1919, 



Debits. 



Item. 



Disbursement voachecs. 



Fiscal year 
1919. 



Primary projects $7,602,434.66 

Secondary projects I 06,067.99 

Indian irrlgaUon 1,466.83 

Misoellaneoas 601,654.07 



To June 90, 
1919. 



$135,286,620.36 
1,136,786.27 
2,909,228.97 
5,487,606.71 



Total 8,208,612.44 144,820,091.31 



Transfers received. 



Flscalyear 
1919. 



$636,813.88 
32,686.70 



27,160.82 



606,609.40 



To June 80, 
1919. 



$6, 488, lU. 88 
141,379.21 
335,833.00 
406,558.04 



7,370,806.72 



Credits. 



Cdleotian vouchees. 



Item. 



Fiscal year 
1919. 



L 



Primarylprojects $1,181,998.99 

Secondary projects ' 44,404.43 

Indian irrigation i 613.99 

MisoeUaneons \ 67,848.57 



Total 1,884,866.97 



To June 80, 
1919. 



$11,633,876.00 

104,487.54 

3,907,845.34 

1,060,008.02 



16,794,166.80 



Water-right diarges. 



Fiaoalyear 
1919. 



$2,682,721.19 



2,682,721.19 



To June 80, 
1919. 



$12,607,634.80 



12,607,634.80 



Item. 


Credits. 
Transfers issued. 


Net investment. 




Fiscal year 
1919. 

$113,843.19 
24,977.06 


To June 30, 
1919. 


Fiscal year 
1919. 


To June 30, 
1919. 


Priniftry,pn>j<^ts- , 


$2,350,139.11 

107,414.04 

147,223.42 

4,666,030.15 


$4,209,675.16 

61,221.61 

1852.34 

14,176.17 


$115,184,12d7fl»- 


Senofidafy projects 


1,066,162.90 


Tndian irrlfmtlon 


1 16.00 


\l1;K«11f|nAnf^ff , 


466,680.15 


168,127.48 






Total 


506,600.40 


7,270,806.72 


4,386,936.38 


116,418,399.71 







1 Deduct . 



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FIKAKCES. 



65 



Table 22. — Investment, by projects , from the appropriation for increase of compensa- 
tion to June SO, 1919, 



Proileet. 



Debits. 



DisbtmementToadiera. 



FIsoalyear 
1919. 



To June 
80, 1919. 



Transfers reoQived. 



Fiscal Tear 
1919. 



To Jane 
30, 1919. 



Salt River 

Tmna 

Oiiand 

Grand Valley 

XJnoampahgre 

Boise 

King mil 

ifinidoka 

Garden City 

Huntley 

Ifilk River 

St. Mary storage 

Snn River 

Lower YeUowstoDo 

North Platte 

Newbmds 

Carlsbad 

Rio Grande 

North Dakota pumpixig. . 

Umatilla 

Klamath 

Belle Fourdie 

Strawberry Valley 

Okanogan 

Takima 

Shoshone.... 

Colorado Basin 

iron Canyon cooperative . 
San Luis Valley 



Snake River Basin 

Owyhee 

North Platte cooperative 

Angostura 

General investigations, Utah . 

Powder River 

Riverton. 

BlaeklBet 

Flathead. 

Fort Peek. 

Drainage and cut over 

General accounts 

General recoanoissanoe 



Total »44,94L88 685,488.80 



119,961.96 
2,906.39 
12,814.45 
10,87&21 
23,860.78 
15,284.94 
12,570.39 



89,043.14 
89,145.12 
4,870.89 
20,697.79 
27,669.76 
87,077.53 
20,114.34 
19,880.83 



4,686.84 

6,745.02 

4,647.42 

15,113.25 

3, 19a 85 

39,930.67 

12,641.58 

3,386.07 

64,960.60 

2,35L78 

4,602.26 

6,520.62 

4,283.38 

2788.02 

3,885.68 

84,044.09 

12,614.70 

789.81 

10.93 

114.33 



866.86 
24.16 
68.39 



IOO1O6 

83 

107; 01 



9,447.96 

10,677.00 

13,027.42 

24,866.86 

4,484.77 

68,029.52 

21,318.86 

6,55L49 

97,940.81 

3,627.16 

7^856.86 

11,024.94 

7,939.18 

4,672.29 

4,331.12 

96,471.97 

28,339.78 

980.84 

10.98 

114.33 

67.96 

356.86 

24.16 

68.39 

168.69 

108.84 

.38 

216.45 



20,636.15 
909L91 



81,247.16 
1,08L96 



11,087.05 
254.42 
756.34 
629.19 
1,221.10 
786.44 
777.23 



275.86 
353.81 
271.62 
748.61 
24a 47 

2,467.64 
9ia61 
289.83 

3^183; 86 
204.73 

2gao3 

416.86 
286.18 
276.19 
369.64 
1,787.36 
698.48 
60.48 



6.01 

.60 

280.51 



4.07 



L64 



112.66 
106.64 
766.66 
108.96 
70.06 
3.68 
11L16 



20,20166 



8407.14 

1,75a 70 

350.40 

1,085.96 

1,113.72 

1,665.56 

953.50 

1,117.64 

8.89 

47^88 

550.81 

536.96 

1,063.41 

340.64 

8,653.39 

1,302.08 

415.68 

4,220.59 

286.02 

47a 48 

6311.84 

422.88 

419.72 

45L16 

8,814.60 

1,206.16 

7a48 



6.01 

9.91 

380.61 



4.07 
2.80 
L64 



117.91 
14a 48 
1,42L16 
191.18 
70.06 

a68 

11L16 



81, 018. 98 



138654r~19- 



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66 EIGHTEENTH AITNXTAL BEPORT OF BBOLAMATION SERVICE. 

Table 22. ^-Investment, 6y projects, from the appropriation for increase of compensa- 
tion to June 30 r i9J9--Contdnued. 





Credits. 






Project. 


CoUootion vooch- 
jers. 


Transfers issued. 


Net inyestmont. 




Fiscal 
year 1919. 


To June 
30, 1919. 


Fiscal year 
1919. 


To June 
30, 1919. 


Fiscal year 
1919. 


To June 
30, 1919. 














$9,450.28 








80.93 


10.93 


$21,068.07 
3,162.81 
13,570.79 
11 507.02 
25,067.29 
16,019.99 
13,337.62 


40,902.89 








6,221.38 






$43.36 
51.14 
9.17 
7.81 






21.690.39 




ia38 
4.59 
1.39 






28,732.84 








38.723.91 








21. 06a 08 




10.00 


18.66 


20,989.81 
















6.00 


6.00 


4,956.20 

6,099.11 

4 919.04 

15,857.80 

3 447.32 

42,398.31 

13,559.11 

3,675.62 

68,144.65 

2,556.51 

4,800.29 

6,935.77 

4,564.95 

3,052.64 

8,745.22 

36,816.82 

13,206.80 

850.29 

10.93 

120.34 

.50 

637.36 

24.16 

62.46 








22.61 

.40 

5.26 

1.28 
















4.06 








le.. 





















1.08 
.28 


16.81 
4.03 

10.08 
6.02 

























mping- 






















.61 
3.56 
4.67 


26.05 
6.31 
4.67 
















7 »., 


1.00 


1.00 










14.63 


i4.63 












1.33 


1.33 












erativ6 



































77.89 


n 










637.36 












24.16 


)eratlve 










62.46 


Ango^tirft . 










161.48 


Genoral investigatioDS, Utah 










101.62 

.33 

219.66 

105.64 

755.65 

103.96 

70.06 

827.52 

1,021.07 


105.38 


Powder River '. 










.33 


Ri verton 




1.60 






832.86 


Blackfoet 








148.43 


Flathead 1 






1,42L16 


Fort Feck 










191.18 


Draixiaeeand cut over 










70.06 


GtenerafaflCfflints 


26.91 


89.71 


20,185.40 


30,986.11 


176.01 


General recannoissancp. 


1,143.12 












Total 


61.16 


318.84 


20,204.66 


31,013.93 


344,880.72 


635,109.96 







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FINANOBS. 
OOLLBOnONS. 



67 



The table below gives information as to collections that haye 
been made mider the reclamation operations. 

Table 23. — Analysis of cash collections to June 30^ 1919. 



Sources. 


Fiscal 3rears 
1903-1918. 


Fiscal year 
1919. 


Total to June 
30^ 1919. 


^bcellaiieocui mhw. , . , 


12,807,739.98 

14,846,891.96 

4,841,641.32 

1,727,111.13 

358 196.98 

84,148.71 

16,000,047.78 

« 3, 776, 859. 80 

41,466.84 


1278,106.78 

322,086.23 

627,261.73 

143,060.95 

11,871.06 

20.00 

1,478,050.03 

1,164,671.16 

4;45a22 


$3,166,451.85 




5,168,978.18 
5,368,903.05 


Temporary water ratals t , , 


Powier ann light - - 


1,870,181.08 
370,067.99 


Transportation refriitds ... ^ / . 


Forfeitdres by bidders and oontractors ] 


8l,168w71 


Wat€«^ght oo*i-stmction chaiwts - - ^ ^. . , ;. . . , 


7,492,606.42 

4,834,417.26 

45,917.06 




Over disl*anKanents x . ^ . ^ .. ^ * T* 




Total 


24,484,104.44 


3,917,687.16 


28^401,69L60 





1 Inocnsistency between this table and similar ooe in Seventeenth Annual Report caused by adjustment 
between claflses of collections made in flsoal year 1919. 

BIO aBANDB DAM APPBOPBIATION. 

The three tables that follow give for the Rio Grande Dam appro- 
priation information similar to that appearing in Tables 15 to 17| 
mclusiye, with corresponding titles for tne reclamation fxmd: 

Table 24,— Special appropriation for Rio Orande (Elephant Butte) Dam (34 Stat.^ 

1357) to June 30, 1919. 



Debit. 



Credit. 



Appropriation warrant No. 79, Mar. 4, 1907. , 

InsDunements, 2,896 vouchers 

Collections, 24 vouchers 



81,000,091.78 



11,000,000.00 



91.78 



Total. 



1,000,091.78 1,000,091.78 



Tablb 25. — Balances of appropriations for Rio Grande (Elephant Butte) Dam toith 
Treamrer of the UnUed States, June 30, 1907, to June 30, 1919, 



Fiscal year. 


Appropria- 


With- 
drawals. 


Balances. 


1907 


81,000,000.00 


'**$33,*rii*2i* 

137,074.22 
247,217.23 
327 875.96 
214,052.49 
39,166.89 
1,501.00 


81,000,000.00 
966,886.79 


1908 


1909 




829,812.67 
682,596.34 


1910 




1911 




254,719.38 


1912 




40,666.89 


1913 




1,501.00 


1914 










Total 


1,000,000.00 


1,000,000.00 









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68 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 



Table 26. — DishnrseTnent and collection vouchen, appromiationfcfr Rio Grande (Elephant 
Butte) Darrif paid and collected to June SO, 1919, 





Disbursement 
Touchers. 


CoUection 
vouchers. 




Number. 


Amount. 


Number. 


Amount. 


Balance from Seventeenth Annual Report 


2,806 


11,000,001.78 


34 


$01.78 







Table 27. — Statement showing cost of investigations for the reclamation by drairiage of 
lands outside existing reclamation projects and of the reclamn,tion and preparation for 
cultivation of cut-over timber lands xn any of the States of the United States (act of 
July 1, 1918, 40 Stat., 634^6). 

General and miscellaneous expense. i $36,670. 84 

Investigatlonsin northern district 38,113.13 

Investigations in southern district 80,168.06 

Investigations in western district , 6,862.78 

Total 100,714.78 

Add amountso3lleoted, credited to cost, and carried to appropriation as refunds 384. 86 

Orosscost 100,000.14 

Analysed as fallows: 

Direct appropriation $100,000.00 

Miscellaneous collections (refunds) 384.36 

Increased compensation fund 733.47 

Total 101|007.83 

Expenditures: 

Drainage and cut-over fund $06,447.16 

Increased compensation fund 723.47 

Subtotal 07,170.63 

Balanceunexpended June 30, 1010....' 3,837.20 

Less llablliUesonJune30,mO 8,828.61 

Balance of appropriation unencumbered 8.00 

1 mcludesservices of colonisation expert, general studies, and office expense not practicable to allocate 
to districts. 



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ACCOTTHTIVG TEBIQVOLOOT. 

Accounting. — The art or science of analyzing, claasifyiiig, recording, summarizing, 
and interpreting facts relating to the acquisition, production, trailer, and owner- 
ship of articles of wealth or value. 

Accounts. — Systematic statements of financial facts of identical or opposite character, 
so arranged as to readily provide summaries or balances of the same. 

Accnuils of tvater-right charges. — ^The installments on account of construction or opera- 
tion and maintenance charges which become due upon definite dates. 

Advance payments of water-tight charges. — ^The amounts paid by water users in excess of 
accruals. 

Allotment. — As used in the Reclamation Service, an allotment is that part of an ap- 
propriation which is allotted by the Director to a project for expenditure. 

Appropriation. — As used in Reclamation Service accounting, this represents the 
amount of money set aside by Congress from the reclamation fund to be used in 
the construction or operation and maintenance, or both, of a project. 

Assets of a project. — ^The amount of money, or property expressed in terms of money, 
which the projects owns or which is at its disposal. 

Bookkeeping.— ^The mechanical operation of assembling financial data in books of 
record. (See AccouTitstaid Accounting.) 

Capital investment. — ^The group of accounts representing actual transactions in cash, 
or its equivalent. All money transactions and transactions in property and serv- 
ices expressed in terms of money, will be finally recorded in this group. The 
total "msbursements'' less the total "collections*' is the "net investment." 

Charges, water-right. — See Constntction and Operation and maintenance charge. 

Clearing accounts. — ^Accounts for handling operating expenses incidental to the work, 
which can not be charged with reasonable accuracy direct to feature costs, and 
which are " cleared' ' in some more or less arbitrary manner at the close of stated 
periods. 

Collections.— yioneyB, OT the equivalent thereof, received by the Government in 
liquidation of a debt due or to become due. 

Commercial paper. — As used in reclamation accoimting, commercial paper is synony- 
mous with personal checks, bank drafts, post-office money orders, and like docu- 
ments whicn are convertible directly into cash or its equivalent. 

Construction cost. — See Cost. 

Construction water-right charge. — A charge assessed against the irrigable area to cover 
the cost of construction of the irrigation system. 

Controlling accounts. — ^Acccoimts established in the general ledger in which are sum- 
marized the transactions recorded and carried in subsidiary or auxiliary records. 

Cost. — ^The gross cost of construction of a project is the value of services performed or 
property used, either directly or indirectly, in connection with the construction 
of the irrigation and auxiliary works of the project. It does not include the 
value of materials purchased and still in stock, but does include services and 
materials used, even though still unpaid and carried as liabilities. The net cost 
of construction of a project is its gross cost less the value of all revenues the occurs 
rence or accrual of which is incidental to the work during the period of con- 
struction. 

Depreciation. — The reduction of the original cost or value, due to deterioration by 
wear and tear or otherwise, of a structure, facility, or unit of eauipment. 

Detail cost accounts. — Classes or divisions of expense making up tne cost of a physi- 
cal feature. 

Disbursements. — See Expenditure. 

Equipment. — Equipment, or nonexpendable property, is property which neither loee« 
its identity, becomes a permanent fixture, nor is immediately consumed when 
applied to its intended use. 

Estimate. — As used in the Reclamation Service, an estimate is an opinion or calcula- 
tion obtained from the best information at hand of the cost of doing a stated work 
and of the quantities of the several units of work contained therein. 

Expenditure. — The payment or disbursement of cash, or its equivalent, when such 
act operates to deprive the payor of further use-or control of the article or property 

74 



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ACCOUNTING TERMINOLOGY. 75 

thus disbursed. In theory, when the construction of a project is completed, all 
liabilities and obligations liquidated, and all cash, equipment, materials, and 
other like assets expended in the work, then the '* total expenditures" and the 
''gross construction cost*' of the project will be eciual. 

Funds. — The amount of money available for expenditure for a specified purpose. 

Oro$8 cogts.—See Cost. 

Inventory. — ^An itemized account, catalogue, or schedule of equipment, materials, 
supplies, or other property which is on hand and available for use. 

Investment. — See Capital investment. 

Invoice. — ^The vendors' statement of goods sold, containing items, unit prices, and 
value of merchandise delivered or to be delivered. In reclamation accoimting 
the term "invoice" must never be confused with ''inventory." 

Liabilities. — ^The amount of money, or of propcrtv or services expressed in terms of 
money, which the project owes, or is under obligation to pay, deliver, or render. 
(Repayment accounts are included in the project's liabihties for the reason that 
such accounts represent the amount of money which the project must return to 
the Government.) 

Maintenance. — See Operation and maintenance. 

Mercantile store. — ^The term used to designate buildings and contents where goods are 
kept for the purpose of sale, either for cash or coupons, or to be chai^ged as deduc- 
tions on pay rolls. 

Mess hoitse. — ^The term used to designate an eating place or dining room. It is im- 
proper to refer to such a place as a "commissary.'' 

Novuxpendable property. — See Equipment. 

Obligations. — See lAabilities. 

Operation and maintenance. — "Operation" is the actual use of an irrigation system 
for the development and distribution of water, including works for drainafi;e and 
flood protection, to preserve the irrigated luids against excess water. "Mainte- 
nance" embraces the repairs and renewals necessary to preserve the irrigation 
and drainage system in its ori^;inal efiSciency. 

Operation and maintenance water-right charge. — ^^ annual charge assessed against the 
irrigable area to cover the cost of the operation and maintenance of the irrigation 
system. 

Operation and maintenance year. — The irrigation year, usually the calendar year (Jan. 
1 to Dec. 31, inclusive). On some southern projects the operation and mainte- 
nance year is arranged to accord with the irrigation season, but unless otherwise 
specified the term "Operation and maintenance year" is synonymous with 
odendaryear. 

Original entry. — ^The first record made of a chaige or credit which becomes the basis 
of proof of the account. 

Physical features. — The division of principal features for the purpose of collecting 
special costs on separate and distinct jobs or units or divisions of a project. Thev 
usually represent some tangible product when construction is completed, such 
as a cimal, dam, bridge, etc. 

Physical inventory. — ^The act of determining the quantity of equipment, materials, 
or supplies on hand by actual counting, weighing, or measuring each kind of 
property, and of making definite record thereof. 

Plant or plants accounts. — ^As used in reclamation accounting, these accoimts are de- 
sired to receive all charges for the cost of original equipment and installation, 
with additions thereto, and also the cost of extraordinary repairs and of tempo- 
rary plants erected to facilitate work on a project. 

Posting. — The act of transferring amoimts from a book or record of original entry to 
a ledger. 

Principal features represent a general division of the project into primary parts or units, 
the nature or function of each feature is usually implied by its name, such as 
examination and survey, storage works, canal system, etc. 

Property J nonexpendable. — See Equipment. 

Refund. — A reimbursement of an amount previously paid. 

Register. — ^As used in reclamation accounting, this is a journal which, by special rul- 
ing, is designed to facilitate the recording of accoimting transactions. It is 
usually, but not always, a book of original entry. 

Reimbursable accounts. — ^Those kept to record the results of operations not directly 
related to cost-ledger features; the cost of their maintenance is reimbursed by 
cash receipts or deductions from service earnings. 

Repair. — Replacement of some part of a structure, facility, or unit of equipment, 
made necessary throu^ wear or other casualty, when such replacement does not 
amount to a substantial change of identity in such structure, facility, or unit of 
equipment. 



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76 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL BBPOBT OF RECLARiATION SBRVICB. 

Repayments. — Represent the sources from which the Government expects to secure 
reimbursement to the reclamation hmd. 

Replacement. — ^The substitution, as a whole, for a structure, facility, or equipment, 
worn out or become inadequate in service, such substitution having no greater 
capacity than the thing for which it was substituted. 

J?«ottrce«.— See Assets. 

Revenues. — Revenues are incidental to the construction or operation and maintenance 
of a project, and the accruals thereof tend to decrease the gross costs of the con- 
struction or operation and maintenance of the project as a whole. 

Storehouses. — ^As aiHtinguished from mercantile stores, storehouses are the buildincs, 
bins, chutes, or yards in which Government property is stored, available for 
assignment to the work, or transfer to other storehouses or projects. 

Supplemental construction. — ^The improvements of an irrigation or drainage system, 
or any part or structure thereof, of a completed project, or of a completed portion 
of a project, as to which the construction charges have been announced. 

Water-right charges.— See Construction and Operation and maintenance charge. 



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DISCUSSION OF PROJECTS. 
PRIMARY PROJECTS. 

(For detailed tables on cement, unit bids and contract prices, engineering data 
for projects on completion, crops, etc., Fee appendix.) 

ABIZOVA, SALT BI7EB PBOTECT. 

(Project turned o^er to water users on Nov. 1, 1917. ) 

W. R. Elliott, Salt River VaUe^ Water Users' Association, general superintendent 
and chief engineer, Phoenix, Ariz. 

LOCATION. 

Counties: Maricopa and Gila. 

Townships: 2 S. to 3 N., Rs. 1 to 6 E. and 1 W., and Tps. 3 to 5 N., Rs. 11 to 14 
E., Gila and Salt River base and meridian. 

Railroads: Santa Fe, Preecott & Phoenix; Arizona Eastern. 

Railroad stations and other towns, showing estimated population Jime 30, 1919: 
Phoenix, 30,330; Me8a,4,500;Glendale, l,500;Tempe, 2,000; Chandler, 1,400; Peoria, 
350; Gilbert, 50; Scottsdale, 50; Higley, Lehi, Tolleson, Alhambra, Cashion, and 
Laveen, each about 25. 



WATEB ST7PPLY. 

Source of water supply: Salt and Verde Rivers and wells in various parts of the 
valley. 

Area of drainage basins at Granite Reef Dam: Salt River, 6,250 square miles; Verde 
River, 6,000 square miles. 

Annual run-off in acre-feet: Salt River at Roosevelt (5,760 square miles), 1889 
to 1918, maximum 3,226,000, minimum 153,394, mean 846,260; Verde River at 
McDowell (6,000 square miles), 1889 to 1918, maximum 1,822,000, minimum 116,679, 
mean 570,860. 

AOBICUIiTTTBAL AND CUMATIC CONDITIONS. 

Area for which works are prepared to supply water, season of 1918: 192,077 acres, 
entitled to permanent water, including private, homestead, and school lands, and 
townsites; and 20,889 acres entitled to temporary water service. 

Area irrigated imder rental contracts, season of 1918: 23,145 acres (on Sept. 30, 
1918). 

Area irrigated under public notice, season of 1918: 182,471 area (on Sept. 30, 
1918). 

Lcoigth of irrigating season: 365 days, October 1 to September 30. 

Rainfall on irrigable area: 34-year period, average, approximately 8 inches. Cal- 
endar year 1918, 10 months, 10.4 inches. 

Average elevation of irrigable area: 1,200 feet above sea level. 

Range of tempjerature on irrigable area: 22® to 117® F. 

Character of soil of irrigable area: Sandy loam, with clay in places. 

Principal products: Allialfa, grain, cotton, citrus, and aedduous fruits, and live 
stock. 

Principal markets: Phoenix and other Arizona towns, Pacific coast cities, and 
eastern markets. 

LANDS OPENED FOB IBBIOATION. 

Public notices: January 18, May 19, August 8, 1917. 

77 



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78 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL BEPOBT OF RECLAliiATION SEBVICB. 

CHRONOLOGICAL STJICMABY. 

Reconnoissance made and jprelimiiiaiy survevs b^n: 1902. 

CoDBtruction recommeBded by the directot: tiiarcn 7, 1903. 

CoDBtruction conditionally authorized by the SeCTetary: I^rch 14, 1903. 

Grand, Water Power, Salt Kiver Valley, Maricopa, and Joint Head Canals purchased: 
June 15, 1906. 

Intake Bam for Power Canal completed: October, 1906. 

Power Canal completed: October, 1906. 

Irrigation by the Keclamation Service begun: May 15, 1907. 

Granite Reef Dam completed: August, 1908. 

South Canal completed: June, 1909. 

Eastern Canal completed: December, 1909. 

Roofie^elt Dam completed: February 5, 1911; formal dedication, March 18, 1911. 

San Francisco pumping plant completed: October, 1911. 

South-Consolidated power plant, operation commenced: October 23, 1912. 

Arizona FaUs power plant, operation conmienced: May, 1913. 

Western Canal completed and operation conmienced: February 16, 1913. 

Mesa District pumping plants (Batteries A, B, C, D, E, F), drilling commenced : 
December, 1908; final installation completed, June, 1913. 

Highline pumping plant put in operation: June, 1913. 

Hi^hline Canal completed and operation commenced: June 16, 1913. 

Raising of spillways, Roosevelt Dam, completed: August, 1913. 

Joint Head Dam completed: March, 1914. 

Reconstruction of the Arizona Canal completed: February, 1915. 
. McQueen pumping plant completed: I^rch, 1915. 

Farm unit survey completed: April, 1915. 

Water over spillways of Roosevelt Reservior: April 14, 1915; January-May, 1916. 

Survey for silt deposit in Roosevelt Reservoir: June, 1915. 

South Side Canal system completed: June, 1915. 

Installation of sixth unit, Roosevelt power plant, completed: November, 1915. 

Cross Cut power plant completed: December, 1915. 

Project turned over to water users: November 1, 1917. 

Project 100 per cent completed: June 30, 1919. 

IBBiaATION PLAN. 

The irrigation plan of the Salt River project provides for the stora^ of water in 
the reservoir created by the building of the lloosevelt Dam, which is situated at the 
confluence of Tonto Creek and Salt River, about 70 miles northeast of Phoenix, 
Ariz. This stored water is carried down Salt River to a point about 4 miles below 
the mouth of the Verde River, where, together with such water as may be discharged 
by the Verde, it is diverted to the North and South side canal systems by the Granite 
Roei Diversion Dam. The water supply for the canals on the north side of the river 
is further augmented by the water diverted by the Joint Head Diversion Dam. 

There have been completed and put into operation nine pumping plants with an 
approximate capacity each of 10 second-feet. A pumping plant located at the junction 
of the Western Canal and the Kyrene branch pumps water through a 54-inch pressure 
pipe 5,930 feet long to an elevation of 40 feet and waters approximately 7,500 acres 
of land. The United States claims all waste, seepage, unappropriated spring, and 
percolating water arising within the project, and proposes to use such water in con- 
nection therewith. 

The canal and lateral system at present comprises 836.5 miles, and on completion 
of the project provides for the delivery of water to each 160-acre tract of irrigable land . 

A power plant located at Roosevelt generates power from stored water in the reservoir 
and from water delivered from the Power Canal, heading at a diversion dam in Salt 
River, 19 miles above the storage dam. Three other power plants have been con- 
structed by the water users' association and have become a part of the project, viz, 
the South-Consolidated, the Arizona Falls, and the Cross Cut. A portion of tne power 
developed will be used for pumping water for irrigation and the remainder for indus- 
trial purposes. 

The principal features are the Intake Dam and Power Canal, the Roosevelt Dam, 
Granite Reef Dam, Joint Head Dam, the main canals of the distributing system and 
Uie greater part of the lateral system, and the power system, comprising four power 

Slants, transformer house, transmission lines, switching: station, and four substations, 
ome work remains to be done on the sluicing tunnel through the Roosevelt Dam, 
and rather extensive repairs are now needed on the Intake Dam and Granite Reef 
Dam. 



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ABIZONA, SALT BIVEB FBOJEOT. 79 

SX710CABY OF aSNBBAL DATA FOB SALT BIVEB PBOJEOT, TO END 
OF FISCAL YEAB, 1919. 

Areas: 

Irrigable acreage when project is complete 192, 077 

Publicland entered to end of fiscal year 16,170 

Private land 175,907 

Acreage Service could have supplied season of 1918 > 212, 966 

Acreage actually irrigated, season of 1918 205, 616 

Acreage cropped under irrigation, season of 1918 184, 432 

Crops: 

Value of irrigated crops, season of 1918 $18,188,800.00 

Value of irrigated crops, per acre cropped $98. 70 

Finances: 

Net construction cost to end of fiscal year $10, 548, 253. 63 

Per cent complete at end of fiscal year 100 

Appropriated for fiscal year 1920 $1 , 000. 00 

Proposed appropriation, fiscal year 1921 $1, 000. 00 

Appropriation, fiscal year 1919 $1, 000. 00 

Repavments: 

. value of construction water-right contracts , 10, 166, 021. 97 

Construction charges — 

Accrued to end of fiscal year 406, 640. 88 

Collected to end of fiscal year 406,640.88 

' Water-rental chaives— 

Accrued to end of fiscal year 2, 246, 726. 01 

Collected to end of fiscal year 2,246,726.01 

* Pbwer earnings — 

Accrued to end of fiscal year 998, 411. 03 

Collected to end of fiscal year , 998,411.03 

Drainage: Cost of drainage works to end of fiscal year 7, 673. 05 

CONSTBTJCTION DTTBINa FISCAL YEAB. 

North outlet tunnel. — Work was started in 1918 to control the dis- 
charge from the north outlet tunnel by constructing a new tunnel, 
tapping the present tunnel at a point immediately below the end of 
the pipes leading from the balanced valves and terminating on the 
soutn face of the north abutment cliff in which would be had, im- 
bedded in concrete; 3 steel pipes, on the discharge end of which will be 
installed 3 needle valves. It was intended that this work be com- 
pleted during the winter months of 1918-19, but as the factory did 
not make shipment of the valves in time to complete the work it was 
necessary to postpone the installation into the winter of 1919-20. 
During me year ending June 30, 1919, the excavation of the tunnel 
was carried to breaking through into the old tunnel with approxi- 
mately a 4-foot ojpening. All of the material and equipment required 
for die complete instalbtion are on hand. The needle-valve installa- 
tion is complete and about 30 feet of pipe have been laid in place. 
All the concrete has been placed in the* needle-valve platform and 
needle-valve operating chamber. The installation is about 75 per 
cent complete. 

HigMine pumpina plant. — ^As the present pumping plant supply 
of water to the Highlme Canal system was found madequate during 
the seasonof maximum irrigation, it was necessary to install a fourth 

^ Indodes 30,880 aoree entitled to temporary water servioe. 

> All uneo U ected and unpaid items assomed by S<Ut River Water Users' Association when project was 
turned oyer mider the provisions of contract dated Sept. 6, 1917. 



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80 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL BEPOBT OF RECLAMATION SEBVIOE. 

unit at this plant. The original installation consisted of three 20- 
second-feet capacity pumping units, to which was added one unit 
with a jpumping^capacitj' of 33 J second-feet driven by a 200-horse- 
power General Electric induction motor. This installation, in addi- 
tion to the pump and motor, consists of a 20-foot extension to the 
original building and connection to the concrete pipe used to convey 
this water from the Western Canal to the Hiffhline Canal. The total 
cost is $11,667.60. To June 30, 1919, the plant with the additional 
unit has been found to be of sufficient capacity to meet the demands 
upon it for water. 

Power plant No. 5. — ^A power development possibility located at 
the lower end of the Tempe Cross Cut Canal was acquired for the 

Eroject during the early developing days and is now being improved 
y the installation of a hydro electric 600-kilowatt plant. The plant 
will operate under a 40-foot head and a normal water flow of about 
200-second feet. The plant consists of a single generating unit made 
up of a S. Morgan Smith 860-hor8epower turbine, direct connected 
to a 600-kilowatt, 2,200-volt, 3-phase, 25-cycle General Electric 
induction generator. The voltage as generated by this unit is stepped 
up by three 250 KVA transformers to 11.000 volts, which is the line 
voltage of the distributing system into which this plant feeds. The 
penstock connecting the forebay and turbine is a riveted stedl pipe 
66 inches inside diameter, approximately 98 feet long. A spillway is 

Srovided at the forebay of sufficient capacity to discharge the entire 
ow of the canal past the power plant at times when Uie plant is 
idle. This by-pass is an open concrete flume and delivers the water 
to the tailrace of the power plant. The pliant is approximately 
85 per cent complete and will be in operation during the coming 
fall. 

Pumping plants. — ^During the early part of the year it was deemed 
advisable to augment the nresent supply of water by the installation 
of a number of pumping plants. After a thorough mvestigation was 
made it was decided to distribute the location of these pumping 
plants over the area or throughout the area where the undei^ground 
water plane was nearest the surface of the earth. On the south side 
in the district south of Mesa, west of Gilbert, and north of Chandler, 
in the vicinity of the base line, there are to be installed about 20 
plants, 6 of which are now installed. On the north side along the 
Salt River Valley Canal and along lateral 20 extending north to the 
vicinity of Peoria, together with four plants located north of the 
Grand Canal, immediately north of Phoenix, there will be installed 
about 22 plants, makmg a total installation of approximately 40 
plants, of which, at the end of the fiscal year, 14 had been installed 
on the south side and 4 on the north side. The installation consists 
of a drilled 18-inch well averaging about 200 feet deep cased with 
18-inch diameter No. 10 gauge steel well casing, an 18-inch multi- 
ple stf^e Layne & Bowler turbine casing pump, and one 35 horse- 
power Wagner vertical motor direct connected to the pump shaft; 
together with necessary switchboard equipment, low-voltage re- 
leases, transformers, lightning protection, ana building. The average 
capacity of these wells is approximately 1,350 gallons per minute. 
This work is approximately 40 per cent complete. 

Transmission lines for new pumping plants. — ^In order to supply 
electric power for pumping at the new wells it became necessary to 



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AEIZONA, SALT RIVER PROJECT. 81 

construct about 50 miles of 11,000-volt transmission line, 20 miles 
of which are on the south side portion of the project and 30 miles 
on the north side. The south side lines were completed and work 
started on the north side. Cedar poles were used, none of which was 
less than 40 feet in length. The new lines will, when completed, consist 
of about 8 miles of No. 2 copjper iine, 6 miles of No. 3 copper, 14 miles 
of No. 5 copper, and 21 miles of No. 6 copper. At each pumping 
plant is an outdoor substation consisting of a Biu:ke type UB ligh^ 
ning arrester, a Kellman pole top automatic oil circuit breaker, and 
two 20 KVA Wagner transformers reducing the voltage to 440 volts 
for use at the motor. 

SEEPAaS AND DBAINAaE. 

During the past year a thorough investigation and study have been 
made on the underground water conditions. About 561 test wells 
are used to determine the water level. These have been measured 
at regular intervals throughout the season. No direct drainage 
work has been carried on, but the development of additional water 
by means of the pimiping plants now being installed that are located 
in the area where the water plane is highest will, no doubt, make 
drainage on this project imnecessary. 

OPEBATION OF POWEB SYSTEM. 

The operation of the electrical system was carried on throughout 
the year with no imusual difficulties. The power generated on the 
system was reduced considerably below the production of the year 
previous^ due, primarily, to the necessity of conserving the water 
supply tor irrigation purposes. Practically no water was wasted 
from the reservoir for power development. As a result the output 
of the Roosevelt power plant during the winter months was very 
low, and this plant was shut down during a portion of the winter 
period. The load on the system at that time was carried by the 
vaUey power plants, assisted by power generated with steam at a 
local plant. The curtailment of copper production at the mines 
during the summer months resulted in a lowering of the output 
during the months of heavy irrigation. All of the 6 units in the 
Roosevelt power plant were in operative condition throughout the 
entire year, and there were available at this plant in generating 
capacity 10,000 KVA. Due to the level of the lake and consequent 
loss of hydraulic head this capacity was reduced to 8,350 KVA. 
The screen on the 10-foot penstock entrance was renewed. The 
23,000-volt cables in the power house were overhauled and put in 
condition. New current transformer type roof bushings were 
installed on both Aliami lines where they enter the transformer 
house. 

The Cross Cut power plant operated nearly continuously through- 
out the year, ana it was necessary to shut down only when water 
was out of the canal for cleaning purposes. Owing to the wearing 
effect the water had on the cast-u-on shoes on the stream deflectors 
of the main units, it was necessary to renew the removable part of 
the shoe several times during the year. Considerable maintenance 
necessary to keep the governors in proper working condition. 

188564—19 6 



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82 



EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL BEPOBT OF BBOLAMATION SERVICB. 



All of the generating units in this plant were painted. Vertical 
guide bearings on units No. 2 and No. 5 were rebabbitted. 

The South Consolidated power plant operated continuously 
throughout the year, except when the water was turned out of the 
canal to make deaning of the canal possible. All submerged steel 
in the power house and gates connected with the power house were 
overhauled and painted. Water was pumped from the tailrace and 
draft tubes and a thorough examination made of the foundations of 
the power house to determine if the water in the canal was in any 
way affecting the stability of the foimdations of the building, it 
was found that the foimdations were in perfect condition. This 
plant operated throughout the year with practically no trouble in 
the operation. 

The Arizona Falls power plant operated at aU times when water 
was in the Arizona Canal. During the time the water was out of 
the canal and the plant was idle the entire plant was thoroughly 
overhauled and all u-on and steel work were given a thorough coat 
of paint. No trouble devdoped at this plant during the year. 

The transmission lines were in continuous service auring the 
year. The electrical storms occurring during the summer months 
were unusually severe, and considerable trouble from lightning was 
experienced on all lines. This resulted in nothing more than supply 
interruptions. 

All the substations were in service throughout the year and no 
diflSiculty was encountered in their operation. 

OPBBATION AND HAINTBNANCE. 

The operation and maintenance of the irrigation system was 
carried on successfully throughout the year. The apparent water 
supply was less at the end of the fiscal year than at the same date a 
year ago, but was sufficient to meet requirements. Much assistance 
was obtained by introducing machinery in the maintenance of the 
main canal system. The Eastern Canal was deaned and enlarged 
by removing 18 inches off each bank a distance of approximately 
12 miles with a Ruth dredger, operated by two men. The rest of 
this canal is being enlarged with a drag-line excavator. A consid- 
erable saving in cost was effected by the use of the machinery, as 
well as permitting the deaning to be carried on without shutting 
the water out of the system. This work can now be spread out 
through the entire year without losing the services of the canal 
under cleaning. The canal system has been extended by approxi- 
mately 13 i miles of new laterals, making a total of 836.5 mues of 
canals and laterals. 

The Roosevelt reservoir conditions for the year beginning October 
1, 1917, and ending October 1, 1918, are simmiarized as follows: 



Elevatian 
of water 
surface. 



Contents. 



Oct. 1, 1917 (highest point). 
Oct. 1, 1918 (lowest point). . 



aoi.i 

142.3 



Acf4eeL 
9dS,S7» 
843,020 



,68.7 



640, 4#0 



Amount drawn during period, 804,521 acre-feet. 

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ABIZONA, SALT BIVBE PROJECT. 

CBOPS. 

Crop reportf Salt River project, Arizona, year ending Sept. SO, 1918. 
(Data forniBhed by Salt River Valldy Water Users' Association.) 



83 



CJtop. 



Area 

(acres). 



Allalfo I 63,037 

Barley 9,274 



550 

168 

50,107 

2,030 

2,130 

1,233 

125 

19,405 

1,594 

955 

250 



Berries 

Cotton 

Fruit, dtms 

Fruit, deciduous. . 

Garden 

Lettuce 

Orain*eorg]ium. . . 

Orain-hay 

Indian eom 

Watermelons 



Cantaloupes 

Oat8.....Vr. 

Pasture 

Potatoes. 

Silafe^crops 

Sudan grass (bay). 

Vineyard 

Wbeat 



Less dnpUcated areas. 
Total cropped.., 



Vacant land *. 
Home tracts* 
TowiMite 



Total acreage receiv- 
ing water. 



2,200 

i;i74 

44,002 

727 

291 

2,002 
136 

6,650 

23,606 



184,432 



10,973 
5,326 

4,885 



206,616 



Unit of 
yield. 




Pound . . . 

..do 

...do 



CJrate 

Pound . . . 

Ton 

Pound . . . 
Hundred- 
weight. 

Crate 

Pound... 



Yields. 



Total. 



220,631 
166,941 

660,000 



47,601,400 
13,501,162 
21,302,500 



50,000 

42,691,000 

2,390 

1,814,500 

25,000 

440,000 
1,973,160 



Pound . . . 

Ton 

...do 

Pound... 
Hundred- 
weight. 



3,971,000 

2,910 

12,012 

570,150 

136,320 



Average 
per acre. 



3i 

18 

1,200 



1950 
6,650 
10,000 



Values. 



Per unit 
of yield. 



120.00 
2.75 



.09 



.16* 

.04 

.03 



400 
2,200 

1,900 I 
100 

200 



.95 
.03i 

19.00 
.03i 

2.00 

1.25 
.03 



5,500 
10 
6 

4,200 
20i 



.02* 
5.00 
16.00 

.06 
3.60 



Total and average. 



Total. 



$4,412,625 
459,067 

59,400 
41,875 
7,854,233 
540,046 
630,075 
277,368 
47,500 
1,387,457 
45,415 
63,507 
50,000 

550,000 
50.195 

880,040 
99,275 
14,550 

192,192 
34,209 

490,751 



18,188,800 



Per acre. 



170. OQ 

49.50 

► -4 

108. 00~ 

250.00 

156.75 

266.00 

300.00 

225.00 

38a 00 

n.50 

28.50 

66.50 

200.00 

250.00 
5a 40 

2a 00 

137.50 
50.00 
90.00 

252.00 
74.00 



98.70 



Areas. 



Total irrigable area farms reported 

Total irrigated area farms reported 

Irrigated under water-right applications. 

Irrigated under rental contracts 

Total cropped area f^ums reported 



Acres. 



196,731 
184,432 
182,471 
23,145 
184,432 



Farms. 



«4,250 

M,250 

« 3,850 

*4O0 



Percent 

of 
project. 



90 

84 

83 

10* 

84 



> Seed cotton. 

s Inehiding roadways, ditches, and fallow land . 



s Including house lots, corrals, etc. 
* Estimated. 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Project balance eheet, June SO, 1919, Salt River project. 

Coostmction contract water-right charges unaccrued 19,759,381.00 

Qron construction cost $14,938,399.74 

Phu coostroetiOD-oost adjustment. 168,542.36 



Less coostmct loo-revenue earnings $8, 560, 277. 44 

Leas power earnings. , 998,411.03 



15,106,942.10 



4,558,688.47 



Net ooostraotion cost 10,648,263.63 

Value of construction water-right contracts. 10,166, 02L 97 

OH>ita] investment: 

Disbursement, transfer and joint construction vooofaers received $16, 190, 62& 32 

Collection, transfer, refund and joint construction vouchers issued 6, 040, 015. 57 



Net Investment 

Note.— For detail financial statements, see Seventeenth Annual Report, pp. 71 to 73. 



10,141,612.75 



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ABIZOVA-CALIFOBinA, TTTHA PBOTECT. 

W. W. ScHLECHT, project manager, Yuma, Ariz. 
LOCATION. 

Counties: Yuma, Ariz.; Imperial, Calif. 

Townships: 3 to 13 S., Rs. 21 to 25 W., Gila and Salt River meridians; 9 to 17 8., 
Re. 16 to 23 E., San Bernardino meridian. 

Railroads: Southern Pacific; Yimia Valley Railroad. 

Railroad stations and estimated population June 30, 1919: Yuma, 6,000; Gadsden, 
Ariz., 100; Potholes, Calif., 25. 

WATBB SUPPLY. 

Source of water supply: Colorado River. 

Area of drainage basin: 167,000 square miles above Laguna Dam. 
Annual run-off in acre-feet of Cfolorado River at Yimia (225,000 sqiiare miles), 
1902 to 1918: Maximum, 26,000,000; minimum, 7,960,200; mean, 16,900,000. 

AGBICTJLTTmAL AND CLIMATIC CONDITIONS. 

Area for which the service is prepared to supply water, season of 1919, 70,000 acres. 

Lenj?th of irrpating season: 365 days. 

Elevation of irrigable area: 80 to 215 feet above sea level. 

Rainfall on irrigable area: Six-year average, 2.55 inches; 1918, 2.9 inches. 

Range of temperature on irrigable area: 22° to 118° F. 

Character of soil of irrigable area: Bottom lands, rich alluviimi; mesa lands, Freano 
gravelly sand. 

' Principal products: Semitropical frtiits, alfalfa, grain, and upland and Egyptian 
long-staple cotton. 

Principal markets: Los Angeles and San Francisco, Calif.; Arizona towns; and 
eastern markets for early produce. 

LANDS OPBNED FOB IBBiaATION. 

Dates of public notices: January 12, 1910; March 8, 1912; March 6, June 23, 1913; 
April 7, 1916; April 6, 1917; March 9, May 7, July 16, 1918; March 24, May 3, June 14, 
1919. 

Location of lands opened: T. 15 S., R. 23 E.; T. 16 S., Rs. 22 and 23 E.; San Bernar- 
dino meridian; T. 8 S., Rs. 23 and 24, W.: T. 9 S., Ra. 23 and 24 W.; T. 10 S., Ra. 24 
and 25 W.; T. 11 S., Rs. 24 and 25 W., Gila and Salt River base and meridian. 

Limit of area of farm units: Public, 40 acres. 

Duty of water: 3 J acre-feet per acre per annum at the farm. 

Building chaige per acre of irrigable land: $55, $66, $75, $77, and $90. 

Annual operation and maintenance charge: $2 per acre minimum chaige, which 
entitles the water user to 2 sn re-feet per acre of irrigable land, and $1 per acre-foot 
for water in excess of this amount. 

CHRONOLOGICAL SUMMABY. 

Reconnoissance made and preliminary surveys begun in 1902. 

Construction recommended by board of engineers April 8, 1904. 

Construction authorized by Secretary, May 10, 1904. 

Canal system of Colorado Valley Pumping & Irrigating Co. purchased March 15, 
1907. 

First irrigation by Reclamation Service, season of 1907, 

Canal system of Yuma Valley Union Land & Water Co. (Farmers' Gravity Canal) 
purchased February 3, 1908. 

Rollins ditch (including Ives heading pumps and ditches) purchased July 23, 1908. 

Laguna Dam completed March, 1909. 

Colorado River siphon completed June 29, 1912. 

84 



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ABIZONA-CALIFOBNIA, YUMA PBOJEOT. 85 

Gravity water from Laguna Dam fumifihed to Yimia Valley through siphon June 
29, 1912. 

Yuma Valley Railroad constructed June, 1914. 

Yuma Meea auxiliary reclamation project act passed January 25, 1917. 

Entire project 88.5 per cent completed June 30, 1919, exclusive of Yimia Mesa 
auxiliary project. 

ntBiaATION PLAN. 

The irrigation plan of the Yuma project provides for the diversion of water from the 
Colorado River at the Laguna Dam, 10 miles northeast of Yuma, Ariz., into a canal 
system heading on the California side, conveying water to the irrigable lands on that 
side of the river, including those in the Yuma Indian Reservation, crossing the river 
at Yuma through an inverted siphon and serving 'lands in the Yimia Valley below 
the town of Yuma. The plan also provides for laige pumping plants below Yuma 
on the east main canal for raising water to irrigate 40,000 acres of mesa land. The 
lands adjacent to the Colorado River are protected from overflow by means of levees. 
The United States claims all waste, seepage, unappropriated spring and percolating 
water arising within the project and propcMses to use such water in connection there- 
with. The Laguna Dam, 854.8 miles of canals and laterals, including 32 miles of 
drainage ditches, the Colorado River siphon, 930 feet in length and 14 feet in diameter, 
and the levee system are completed. 

BUHMABY OF GENBBAL DATA FOB YUMA PBOJEOT TO END OF 

FISCAL YEAB 1919. 

Areas: 

Irrigable acreage when project is complete 110, 000 

Public land entered to June 30, 1919 7,500 

Public land withdrawn on June 30, 1919 37,500 

State land unsold June 30, 1919 1, 800 

Indian land, June 30, 1919 8, 500 

Private land, June 30, 1919 54,700 

Acreage service could have supplied in season of 1918 73, 000 

Estimated acreage service can supply In season of 1919 ^70, 000 

Estimated acreage service can supply in season of 1920 ^70, 000 

Acreage irrigated season of 1918 45, 670 

Acreage cropped under irrigation season of 1918 45, 049 

Crops: 

Value of irrigated crops, season of 1918 $5, 105, 132. 00 

Value of irrigated crops per acre cropped 113. 82 

Finances: 

Net construction cost to June 30, 1919 $9,095, 806. 19 

Per cent completed on June 30, 1919 '88.6 

Ap^priated for fiscal year 1920 1383,000.00 

Estunated per cent complete by June 30, 1920 ' 89. 6 

Proposed appropriation for fiscal vear 1921 $435, 000. 00 

Estunated per cent complete by June 30, 1921 91. 

Announced construction charges per acre, $55, $66, $75, $77, 
and $90. 

Appropriation fiscal year 1919 $590,000.00 

Increase of compensation 19, 066. 56 

Increase, miscellaneous collections 156, 106. 12 

$765, 172. 68 

Expenditures chargeable to 1919 appropriation: 

Disbursements 371, 906. 72 

Transfers 30, 843. 30 

Current liabilities '. 43,466.46 

Contingent liabilities 14, 642. 63 

460, 859. 11 

Unencumbered balance on July 1, 1919 304,313.57 

lEzdoding North Gila Valley land. 
*£xch]alve of Yuma Mesa Auxiliary project. 



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86 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL RBPOET OF RECLAMATION SERVICB. 

Bepayments: 

Value of construction water-right contracts $1, 941, 721. 78 

Construction charges — 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 463,338.87 

Collected to June 30, 1919 322,68L62 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 130,667.25 

Operation and maintenance charges (public notice) — 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 177,348.37 

Collected to June 30, 1919 154,157.64 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 23,190.73 

Water-rental charges — 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 455,426.03 

CoUected to June 30, 1919 464,905.75 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 520.28 

Drainage: 

Estimated acreage damaged by seepage to June 30, 1919 6, 000 

Miles of draiDS built to June 30, 1919— 

Open 27 

Closed 4 

Total 31 

Estimated acreage protected by drains to June 30, 1919 28, 000 

EJstimated acreage to be protected by authorized system 58, 000 

Cost of drainage works to June 30, 1919 $444,300.88 

CONSTBTJCTION DUBlNa THE FISCAL YEAB. 

Examination and survey. — Preliminary surveys, including test pits, 
estimates, and plans for an all- American canal from Laguna Dam to 
the Iniperial VaUey, were completed and the final report of the board 
of engineers is in progress. For the Yuma Mesa auxiliary project the 
preliminary surveys and estimates were completed and the draft of 
the public notice, mcluding the farm unit plats for the first unit> was 
submitted. 

Lateral system. — ^The work in progress on the lateral system con- 
sisted in blinding several small wooden turnouts, checks, and bridges 
for the farm unite created by opening a portion of the Bard town site, 
and also for the farm unite opened by the public notice of July 16, 
1918. 

Drainage system, — Work on the main drain for the Yuma Valley 
was in progress and 5.8 miles of this drain were built. The material 
moved amoimted to 185,000 cubic yards. The building of the drain 
necessitated the reconstruction of 1.5 miles of laterals and the build- 
ing of five flumes and four bridges. At the lower end of the drain 
work on the ^* boundary" drainage pumping plant was under way. 
The ultimate installation comprises a reinforced concrete building, 
one 75 and three 100 horsepower semi -Diesel engines, direct connected 
with one 30-inch and three 36-inch screw pumps; concrete forebay 
and reinforced concrete outlet through the levee. The plant, witn 
the exception of the installation of two 36-inch pump unite, was com- 
pleted diiring November. The work on the plant involved 17,450 
cubic yards of excavation and back fill, 1,315 cubic yards of reinforced 
concrete, the installation of 80 tons of machinery and ironwork, 9,700 
linear feet of piling, and 70 square yards of paving. The cost of the 
plant is $130,500. ^ ^ 

Permanent improvements. — ^Two small cottages on the United States 
Reservation grounds at Yuma were biult at a cost of $2,160 each. 



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ABIZONA-CAUFOBNIA, YUMA PBOJBOT. 
BOABD BBPOBTS. 



87 



Dtte. 


Sobjeot. 


Personnel. 


1918. 
July 

December... 


Rennt to chief of oonstnictton on drainage for 
Tmna Valley. 

and Imperiaf Irrigation District on All-Ameri- 
can Oanal to the Imperial Valley . 


Ehrood Mead, dMirman; C. E. Onma- 
ky; W. W. Schlecht, secretary; and 
I^rter 7. Preston, engineer. 



OPBBATION AND MAINTBNANOB. 

Water was delivered on a weekly rotation schedule during the heavy 
irrigation season and every two weeks during the winter months. The 
operation force consists of 2 water masters, 14 ditch riders, 2 pump- 
men, 1 hjdrographer, 1 clerk, and 4 gate tenders. The cost of main- 
tenance IS hi^ on account of the silt and the rapid growth of weeds. 
The smaller laterals are cleaned by a large V machine, which is hauled 
by two 75-horsepower caterpillar tractors; for the larger laterals two 
}-yard drag-line excavators are used. No important oanal breaks 
occurred during the year. Water was delivered to the reservation 
unit, and to 12,500 acres of the Yuma Valley imit imder water-right 
applications; the balance of the lands in the Yuma Valley received 
water imder rental contracts in accordance with the stipulation 
issued by the court in which the Yuma suit is being tried. During 
1918 the operation and maintenance charge was at the rate of 75 
cente per acre-fopt, which was increased to $1 for 1919. The mini- 
mum charge is for 2 acre-feet. During 1918 a total of 150,229 acre- 
feet of water was delivered to irrigate 45,670 acres of land or 3.3 
acre-feet per acre. 

During July and August, 1918, and May and June, 1919, work on 
riprapping the levees was imder way; 79,192 cubic vards of riprap 
were placed on the reservation (California) levee at the 5 and 8 mile 
points and 31,056 cubic yards on the Yuma Valley (Arizona) levee 
at the 17 and 21 mile pointe. In addition, 27,552 cubic yards of 
riprap and 26,165 cubic yards of earth were placed in raising the 
Yuma Valley levee from "l uma to the point opposite the temporary 
weir of the Imperial District at Hanlon Heading. The cost of this 
work was paid by the Imperial Irrigation District. 

Historiedl review f Yuma project. 



Item. 



Area for which service was prepared to supply water. 

Acreage hrigated 

Idles of canals operated 

Water diverted (acre-feet) 

Water delivered to land (acr»^eet) 

Aore-feet to acre for area under cultivation 



1914 



60,000 
25,207 
272 
164,670 
03,167 



1015 



71,200 
27^867 
307 
246,786 
02,807 
i34 



1016 



72,440 
20,483 
316 
240,700 
94,303 
i20 



1917 



78,000 
86,956 
335 
337,507 
136,541 
8.7 



1918 



73,000 

45,670 

838 

314,900 
150,229 
8.3 



19191 



> 70,000 
55,000 

355 
350,000 
181,000 

8.3 



1 Estimated. 



« Vxehidbig North Oila Valley land. 



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88 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL BEPOKT OF KBCLAMATION SERVICE. 

SETTI4EHENT. 



The unentered public lands of the Yuma Valley were thrown open 
for settlement by the public notice of July 16, 1918. Eleven of the 
farm units were filed on by settlers of the Bard district whose units 
.had been ruined by seepage and alkali. The balance of the units 
were allotted at a public drawing held at Yuma on December 11, 1918. 
A total of 684 applications were received for the 16 units. Due to 
the prevailing high price of cotton and alfalfa, the good crops, and the 
fact that over 80 per cent of the land was planted to these crops, the 
project is in excellent condition. Land values increased at least S50 
per acre. 

Settlement data, Yuma project. 



Item. 



1914 



4,000 

008 

1,816 

3 

4,200 



Total number of farms on project (when com- 
pleted) 

Number of tanha reported 

Population 

Number of towns 

Populati(Hi 

Total population of towns and farms 6, 016 

Number of public schools ' 14 

Number of churches... 7 

Number of banks 3 

Total capital stock of banks , 

Amount of deposits 

N umber of depositors 



1915 



4,000 

737 

2,036 

4 

4,385 

6,421 

15 

7 

4 



1916 



4,000 

790 

2,002 

5 

5,345 

7,347 

17 

9 

4 



1917 



4,000 

900 

2,700 

5 

6,735 

9,435 

20 

9 

4 



1918 



4,000 
1,185 
4,300 

7,590 

11,800 

20 

10 

4 

$175,000 

$1,321,468 

4,572 



To June 
30, 1919. 



4,000 
1,200 
4,500 

8,000 

12,500 

20 

11 

5 

$205,000 

$1,923,287 

5 288 



PRINGIPAL CROPS. 

The principal crops raised during 1918 were cotton (64 per cent of 
area), alffiJfa for seed, and hay (20 per cent of area), and com (10 
per cent of area). During 1919 the area in cotton was reduced and 
.that in alfalfa increased. 



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AKIZONA-CAIIFORNIA, YUMA PROJECT. 
Crop report f Yuma project , Arizona'Califomiat year of 1918. 



89 



Crop, 



Area 

(acres). 



Unit of 
yield. 



Yields. 



Total. 



Average 
per acre. 



Valtua. 



Per unit 
of yield. 



Total. 



Peraere. 



Alfallahay 

AUcOfaseed 

Barley 

Com sorghum 

Hay, except alMfa. . 

Cottoni Egyptian .'.V 
Cotton, short staple. 

Cora fodder 

Truck. 

Beans 

Pasture 

Wheat 

Broom o(Hii 

Cottonseed 



8,039 

4,677 

425 

4,118 

683 

46 

2,915 

25,693 

216 

160 

28 

2,842 

460 

42 



Ton 

Pound.. 
Bushel. 
...do.... 

Ton 

Acre . . . . 
Pound.. 

...do 

Ton 

Acre.... 
Bushel., 

Acre 

Bu^iel.. 

Ton 

...do..... 



28,605 

1,090.352 

12,063 

174,331 

075 



3.21 

360.30 

28.30 

42.40 

1.60 



$19.70 

.23 

1.43 

1.04 

13.57 



710,788 

10,143,762 

549 



214 
395 
2.5 



.60 

.28 

10.04 



410 



14.6 



3.31 



9,343 

15 

10,507 



20.3 
.3 



1.00 
271.67 
58.00 



$566,322 

380,216 

17,292 

181,361 

13,234 

5,558 

355,381 

2,840,253 

5,515 

13,056 

1,356 

44,848 

18,664 

4,075 

614,626 



$63.31 

83.06 

40.68 

44.04 

22.32 

120.83 

121.01 

110.54 

25.63 

87.23 

48.43 

10.18 

40.57 

07.02 



Total 

Estimated additional rev- 
enue derived from al- 
fal£ft and straw and pas- 
turing stock lands 

Less duplicated 



50,644 



5,406 



43,475 



Total cropped. 



Irrigated, no Cfop 

Total inrigated.. 



46,040 



621 



Total and average. 



6,105,132 



113.32 



Areas. 



46,670 



Total irrigable area farms reported 

Total irrigated area farms reported 

Irrigated imder water-right applications 

Irrigated imder rental contracts 

Total cropped area farms reported 



Acres. 



67,850 
46,670 
20,080 
24,600 
45,040 



Farms. 



1,186 



642 
643 



Per 
cent of 
project. 



62.6 
41.6 
10.0 
22.4 
40.0 



PUBLIC NOTICBS AND ORDBRS. 
PUBLIC NOTICE, JULY 16, 1918. 

1. In pursuance of section 4 of the reclamation act of June 17, 
1902 (32 Stat., 368), and of acts amendatory thereof or supplementary 
thereto, particularly the reclamation extension act of August 13, 1914 
(36 Stat., 686), public notice for imentered public lands of the second 
unit of the Yuma project, Arizona-California, is hereby issued, as 
follows: 

2. Lands for whicli water will be fnmished. — Upon proper water- 
right application being made therefor, subject to the onditions 
hereinafter named, water will be furnished under said project for the 
irrigable unentered public lands of the second unit, excluded from 
operation of public notice of April 6, 1917, for said project, but shown 
on farm-unit plats of the following townships, viz: 

Gila and Salt River base and meridian: 

T. 8 S., R. 23 W. 

T. 9 S., R. 23 W. 

T. 8 S., R. 24 W. 

T. 9 S., R. 24 W. 

T. 10 S., R. 24 W. 

T. 11 S., R. 24 W. 

T. 10 S., R. 25 W. 

T. 11 S., R. 26 W. 
San Bernardino meridian: 

T. 16 S., R. 21 E. 

T. 16 S., R., 22 E. 



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90 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVIGB. 

as approved by the Secretary of the Interior on January 15, 1917, 
and amended on the date of this notice. Said plats as amended are 
on file in the office of the project manager, Umted States Reclama- 
tion Service, Yuma, Ariz., and in the focal land office at Phoenix, 
Ariz. 

3. Entry by contestants having preference rights. — ^During the 
statutory period of 30 days to be annoimced by notice of the local 
land office, homestead entry for the imentered public lands embraced 
in the farm units shown on said plats as amended, mav be made at 
said local land office, by those contestants having preference rights 
to any such lands, if entry is found regular and is accompanied by the 
certificate of the project manager showing that water-right applica- 
tion has been filed and the proper water-ri^t charges deposited. 

4. Entry under the act of March 4, 1916.— On and from September 2, 
1918, to November 30. 1918, inclusive, homestead entry for the then 
imentered public lanos embraced in the farm imits shown on said 

Elats as amended, may be made at said local land office, but only 
y those entrymen of lands under the project entitled to make a lieu 
selection under the act of March 4, 1915 (38 Stat., 1215), if entry is 
foimd regular and is accompanied by the certificate of the project 
manager showing that water-right application has been filed and the 
proper water-right charges deposited. 

5. General entry. — I^mestead entries mav be made at said local 
land office for all farm units shown on said plats as amended, not 
entered imder paragraphs 3 and 4 of this notice, on and after 9 o'clock 
a. m., December 11, 1918, by persons holding approved water-right 
applications. Every person desiring to acquire any of said public 
land must execute a water-right appUcation upon a form provided for 
that purpose and accompany the same by payment of the water- 
right charge as hereinafter provided. Each water-right application 
must be for a specified farm unit and more than one person may make 
such application for the same farm imit, but not more than one 
water-nght application can be made by the same person. Such 
water-right application must be filed with project manager, United 
States Reclamation Service. Yuma, Ariz.^ in person, by mail, or 
otherwise within a period ol five days beginning December 6, 1918, 
to and including 9 o'clock a. m., December 11, 1918. Water-right 
applications received after said period of five days will be filed and 
noted in the order of their receipt. 

6. Simultaneons filing of water-right applications. — Water-right 
applications made and filed with the project manager during said 
five-day period will be held and treated as simultaneously filed and 
the project manager will dispose of them as follows: 

(a) Where there is no conffict the water-right application will be 
approved by the project manager. 

(6) Where there are two or more water-right applications for the 
same farm xmit the project manager will wnte on cards the names 
of the several water-nght applicants, and each of those cards 
containing the name of one such applicant, will be placed in 
an envelope upon which there is no distmctive or identifymg mark, 
and at 2 o'clock p. m., December 11, 1918, after all the envelopes 
containing the names of the several water-right applicants shall have 
been thoroughly mixed in the presence of such persons as may desire 
to be present they will be drawn and niunberedin order. The cards 



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ABIZONA-OAUTORNIAy YUMA PEOJEOT.- 91 

as drawn and numbered will be securely fastened to the water-rijght 
applications of the respective persons, and the water-right applica- 
tions will be approved in such order by the project manager. 

7. Approved water-right applications. — ^Approval of a water-right 
application by the project manager will entitle the water-right appli- 
cant to file homestead application at said local land office, for the 
farm unit described in his water-right application. Such homestead 
application should be made within four days from date of approval 
of water-right application. Failure to so make such homestead ap- 
plication, will entitle the water-right applicant next in order for the 
same unit to have his water-right application approved bj^ the proiect 
manager allowing him to make homestead apfmcation, this procedure 
continuing if necessary as to all applicants. No part of a payment 
made will be returned to a successful applicant in any case, it he be a 
qualified homestead entryman. 

8. Failure of applicant to obtain public land applied for. — Where 
any applicant fails to obtain land applied for by nun he will be per- 
mitted to elect whether he will amend his application to embrace 
other lands not affected bv pending applications and otherwise subject 
thereto when such amended application is presented; or withdraw his 
original application without prejudice. In the event of such with- 
drawal the water-right charges deposited will be returned by the 
project manager upon surrender of the receipt therefor. 

9. Warning against unlawful settlement upon public land. — ^No 
person will be permitted to gain or exercise any right whatever under 
any settlement or occupation of any of said public lands, begxm 
without a valid approved water-right application covering the lands 
in question; provided, however, that this shall not affect any valid 
existing right obtained by settlement or entry while the land was 
subject thereto. 

10. Limit of area for which entry may be made. — ^The limit of area 
per entry representing the acreage which, in the opinion of the Sec- 
retary of the Interior, majr be reasonably required for the support of 
a family upon such lands, is fixed as shown upon the plats for the 
several farm units. 

11. Classes of charges for water right. — ^The water-right charges are 
of two kinds, to wit: (a) A charge against each irrigable acre to cover 
cost of construction of the irrigation system, termed the construction 
charge, and (6) an annual charge against each irrigable acre to cover 
cost oi operation and maintenance of the system, termed the opera- 
tion and maintenance charge. 

12. Construction charge. — ^The construction charse for said lands 
shall be S75 per irrigable acre. An initial parent of 5 per cent of the 
construction charge shall be made at the time of filing water-right 
application, and the remainder of the construction charge shall be 
paid in 15 annual instalments, the first 5 of which shall each be 5 per 
cent and the remainder each 7 per cent of the total construction 
charge. The first of said 15 annual instalments shall become due 
and payable December 1 of the fifth calendar year after the initial 
instalment, and subsequent instalments shall become due and pay- 
able on December 1 of each calendar year thereafter. 

13. Advance payment of construction charge permissible. — ^Anv 
water-right apphcant or entryman may, if he so elects, pay the whole 
or any part of tne construction charge owing by him withm any shorter 

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92 EIGHTEENTH ANNVAIa BBPORT OF BBCLAMATION SERVICE. 

period than that provided by the public notices and orders applicable 
to his land. 

14. Operation and maintenance charge. — During the irrigation 
season of 1918, a charge of 75 cents per acre-foot will be made for 
water actually furnished the lands entered hereunder. The operation 
and maintenance charge for the irrigation season of 1919 and there- 
after until further notice will be the same as that charged against 
other like lands under the project. 

15. Place and manner of payment of charges. — ^All charges must be 
paid at the office of the United States Reclamation Service, Yimia, 
Ariz., in currency or by New York draft or money order payable to 
special fiscal agent, Umted States Reclamation Service. 

16. Exclnsion of lands by action of Colorado Kiver. — Every water- 
ri^t application shall contain the following provision: 

The applicant hereby releases the United States from any and all 
claims for loss or damages on account of (1) the exclusion of said 
lands or any part thereof, from the irrigable lands of said project, or 
(2) the failure to supply water for the irrigation of any part of the 
lands hereinbefore described when such exclusion or failure is due to 
(a) the destruction, by flood, erosion, encroachment, or other action 
of the Colorado River, of the levees erected by the Reclamation 
Service along the banks of said river, or (d) a change in the location 
of said levees when such change ia considered necessary bj the 
proper officials of the United States to prevent the destruction of 
saia levees from the sdd causes. Land so excluded shall be relieved 
from payment of all instalments of construction and of operation 
and maintenance charge which otherwise would thereaiter come due 
from the lands so excluded. 

S. G. Hopkins, 
Assistant Secretary of the Interior. 

PUBLIO NOTICE, MAEOH 24, 1919. 

1. Annnal operation and maintenance charges. — In pursuance of 
section 4 of the reclamation act of June 17, 1902 (32 Stat., 388), and 
of acts amendatory thereof or supplementary thereto, particularly 
the reclamation extension act of August 13, 1914 (38 Stat., 686), 
announcement is made that the annual operation and maintenance 
charge for the irrigation season of 1919 and thereafter imtil further 
notice, against all lands of the Yuma project, Arizona-Califomia, 
under puolic notice, shall be a minimum cnarge of $2 per irrigable 
acre whether water is used thereon or not, which charge tHU permit 
the delivery of not to exceed 2 acre-feet of water per acre; and that 
additional water will be furnished at the rate of SI per acre-foot. 
All operation and maintenance charges will be due and payable on 
March 1 of each year for the preceding irrigation season. 

S. G. Hopkins, 
Assistant Secretary of the Interior. 

public NOnOE, MAY 3, 1919. 

1. Land for which water will be furnished. — ^Upon proper applica- 
tion bein^ made therefor^ water will be furnished under the Yiuna 
project, Arizona-Califorma, in the irrigation season of 1919 and 
thereafter, for the irrigable lands of farm units L. & M., sec. 35. 
T. 10 S., R. 25 W., G. & S. R. B. M., shown on the diagram approved 



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ABIZONA-CAUFOBNIAy YUMA FBOJEOT. 



98 



by the reclamation service March 25, 1919, which diagram is amenda- 
tory of a farm xmit plat approved by the department January 15, 
1917. Said diagram and plat are on file in the office of the project 
manager, Yimia, Ariz., and at the local land office. Phoenix, Ariz. 

2. Pablic notice of April 6, 1917, applicable. — ^All the terms and 
conditions of the public notice for the Yuma project dated April 6, 
1917, so far as the same may be applicable, shall apply to the lands 
covered by this public notice and shown on the diagram above 
described. 

John W. Hallowell, 
Assistamt to the Secretary of the Interior. 

PUBLIC NOTICE, JUNE 14, 1919. 

1. Land for which water will be fnmislied. — Upon promr application 
being made therefor, water will be furnished imder the i uma project, 
Arizona-California, in the irrigation season of 1919 and thereafter, 
for the irrigable lands of farm unit C, sec. 23, T. 10 S., R. 25 W., 
G. & S. R. B. M., shown on the diagram approved by the Reclama- 
tion Service, March 25, 1919, whioi diagram is amendatory of a 
farm unit plat approved by the department January 15, 1917. 
Said diagram and plat are on file in the office of the project manager, 
Yuma, Ariz., and at the local land office. Phoenix, Ariz. 

2. Homestead entry. — Homestead entry of said farm unit C may 
be made on or after the date of this notice, under the act of August 17, 
1916 (39 Stat., 516), at said local land office, if foimd regular and 
accompanied by the certificate of the project manager, showing 
that, water-right application has been filed and the proper water- 
right charges deposited. 

3. Public notice of April 6, 1917, applicable. — ^All of the terms 
and^ conditions of the public notice for the Yuma project dated 
April 6, 1917, so far as the same may be applicable, shall apply to 
the lands covered by this public notice. 

John W. Hallowell, 
Assistant to the Secretary of the Interior. 

FINANGLAX STATEMENT. 

Condensed balance sheet Yuma project, June SO, 1919, 



Cash 




$1,657.05 
78,231.64 


InvflFitorv of mftt^rials and suddIIm on hand ^-, -,,,., 




Aocoonts receivable: 

Current acoounts due. . rrr^^, ,,,..... ,,-,,,, ^,,^^,-- 


$164,««7.«3 
1,488,382.91 


Construction water-right charges unaccrued ...,-,,„--.---. 






1,668,050.64 
9,042.63 


Construction work contracted : Undelivered orders 








9,495,509.71 
399,783.52 


Lens construction revenue earnings. .................. ........r....r....r 








Net coDstruetion cost 




9,096,806.19 


Orosi oneration and maintenance cofft . r 


679,785.18 
117,055.13 


Less operation and maintenance earnings. ...T-T^rT t t-r 






462,730.05 






Accounts navable .^T.^r^.TT^r^.Tr^.TTTT*.*^..^, -,»-.,,,^..,,,,,.^., 


52 564.36 






11,' 299. 68 
2,130,533.45 


Collect iODs and contracts of speolflo amounts for repayments to reola- 
matiop fund 




Capital investment: 

Collection, transfer, refund, and Joint construction vouchers issued . . 


10,491,155.17 
1,384,435.65 


Net investmeiit 




9,106,720.62 







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94 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPOKT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 
Feature costs of Yuma project^ June SO^ 1919. 



Principal feature. 



Examination and surveys: 

General 

Yiuna Mesa auxiliary . . 
All-American canal 



Canal system: 

Preliminary work 

Laguna Dam In Colorado Riyer 

Headworks at Laguna dam 

Main canal 

Siphon under Colorado River at Yuma,. 
Other structures on main canal 



Lateral ssrstem: 

Yuma Valley 

Indian reservation. 
GUa Valley 



Drainage system: 
Yuma Valley 

Yuma Valley 

Indian reservation, 

Flood protection: 

Yuma Valley 

Indian, reservation . 
Gila Valley 



plant.. 



Farm units 

Permanent improvements and land 

Telephone system 

Operation and maintenance during construction . 

Gross cost of constructian features 



Balance in plant accounts 

Balance in unadjusted clearing accounts. . 

Gross cost to June 30, 1919 



Fiscal year 
1919. 



112,294.49 

878.62 
M6, 777.36 



19,950.37 



162.35 



162 35 



1,968.29 
2,26L02 



4,229.31 



49,08L40 
34,348.07 



73,420.47 



8,082.62 
19,855.47 



» 27, 938. 09 



5,499.89 



< 278. 17 



130,936.31 



Less revenue earned during construction: 

Rental of buildings 

Rental of grazing and farming lands. . . 

Rental of irri^tion water 

Contractors' freight refunds 

Other revenues, unclassified 

Loss on hospital operations... 

Gain on railroad operations 



130,936.31 



« 392. 22 

«30.00 

4.23 



«92.65 
4,533.85 



4,023.21 



Net construction cost, June 30, 1919 136, 913. 10 



Total to June 
30, 1919. 



$178,382.38 
19,407.06 
12,206.78 



209,896.24 



167,514.46 
1,749,811.04 
352,334.25 
542,941.41 
694,703.22 
65,422.53 



3,672,736.91 



990,318.57 
367,658.48 
153,489.78 



1,511,366.83 



167,622.16 
130,629.27 
146,149.45 



444,300.88 



1,378,615.05 
867,287.12 
405,363.97 



2,661,166.14 



32,614.60 
179,598.56 

12,46&11 
722,040.30 



9,336,078.47 



169,453.93 
38.33 



9,«»,669.71 

— — " 

6,383.34 

1,340.60 

346.51.5.88 

18,605.86 

23,366.37 

« 347. 94 

3,900.21 



399,763.63 



9,095,806.19 



Principal feature. 


Fiscal year 
1919. 


Total to June 
30, 1919. 


'Surveys, general: 

Gross cost 


$3,915.49 
621.00 


$178,903.38 


Reimbursements 


621.00 


Net cost, as shown 


2,294.49 


178,282.38 






•Surveys, All-American canal: 

Gross cost 


28,777.36 
10,000.00 


37,206.78 


Reimbursements 


25,000.00 


Net cost as shown 


16,777.36 


12,206.78 






• Costs not included under flood protection, because reimbursed in full: 
Yuma city l«vfle Imprnvwment"- . . . . 


13,666.30 

34,146.46 

250.20 


12,666.30 


Yum* Vailfiy levee fmprovement 


65,336.37 


Surveys at Hanlons heading 


350.30 




47,061.86 


68,353.77 


RAimbiirsenientrS 


47,06L86 


68,353.77 


< Deduct. 





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AMZONA-CALIFORNIA, YUMA PROJECT. 
Cost statement, by edUndar years, Yuma project. 



95 





Construetion. 


Operation and maintenance. 




Year ending Dec. 31— 


Daring 
construction. 


Under 
public 
notice. 


Total. 


Total cost. 


1907 


$l,.ViO.»l7.35 
1,151,270 00 
772,675.06 
408,606.34 
013,555.20 
1,205,435.08 
307,131.30 
4C0, 027.80 
605,992.32 
887,435.92 
333,052.15 
294,408.90 
34,437.86 


$8,531.01 
31,976.49 
52,776.24 
77,866.11 
81,316.35 
80,584.55 
54,408.32 
50,041.00 
78,506.70 
.88,066.60 
108,520.01 




$8,531.91 
31,976.49 
52,776.24 
95,473.23 
123,786.26 
100,810.27 
70,713.72 
80.615.20 
110,830.55 
147,576.35 
136,553.87 
188,270.64 
144,010.65 


» $1,568, 449. 26 

1,183,246.49 

825,451.29 

504 160.57 


1908 




1909 


*$i7,'667.*i2* 
42,430.91 
20,225.72 
16,305.40 
29.974.20 
32,233.85 
59,519.66 
28,024.86 
188,270.64 
145,183.82 


1910 


1911 


1,087,341.46 
1,396,245.35 
377,848.02 
540,643.00 
806,822.87 
535,012.27 
469,606.02 
482.679.54 
179,348.61 


1912 


1913 


1914 


1015 


1916 


1017 


1918 


Jan. 1 to Jane 30, 1919 


•273.17 




SubtotaL 


8,614,088.27 
150;452.02 

38.32 


722,040.20 


579,785.18 


1,301,826.38 


9,915,863.65 
150,462.93 


Plant aoooants June 30, 1919 

TJnadjnsted clearing accounts June 








88.33 












Total 


8,773,520.51 


723,040.20 


679,786.18 


1,301,826.38 


10,076,354.89 





I Indades prior years. > Credit. 

Cost statement, by fiscal years, Yuma project. 







Opentloo and maintenance. 




Year ending June 30- ^Construction. 

! 


During 
construction. 


Under 
pubUc 
notice. 


Total. 


Total cost. 


1906 


» $2,072,001.51 
1,154,114.78 
401,356.42 
506,830.96 
1,575^164.44 
465,201.95 
287,424.01 
801,776.88 
433,602.14 
305,640.79 
296 624.91 
131,200.48 


I 




I $2,063,001.61 

1,154,114.78 

491,356.43 

506,830.90 

1,575,164.44 

466,301.96 


1900 


1 




1010 


1 




1911 






1912 






1013 






1914 


t $419, 182. 61 
70,036.90 
83,016.25 
02,117.86 
57,060.76 
< 273. 17 




$119,183.61 
311,517.46 
137,874.84 
137,053.51 
143,118.08 
363,077.08 


706,606.63 
1,016,204.34 
571,566.98 
433,694.30 
439,743.89 
394,387.46 


1015 


$141,480.66 
54,850.50 
34,935.65 
85,158.23 

363,851.15 


1010 


1017 


1018 


1019 




Subtotal 


8,614,088.27 
160,453.92 

38.32 


722,040.20 


579,785.18 


1,801,835.38 


9,915,863.66 
160,453.03 


Plant aocoonts June 30, 1919 

X7na4histed clearing accounts June 








38.33 


Total 












8,773,629.51 


722,040.20 


579,786.18 


1,301,835.38 


10,075,354.80 



1 Includes prior years. 



* Includes years 1907 to 1014. 



•Credit. 



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96 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 
Estimated cost of contemplated works, Yuma project, during fiscal year 1920. 



Features. 



Sabfeature. 



Principal 
feature. 



Examination and survey: 

Hydrographio data and silt investigations, Colorado River 

Completion of Investigations and final report All- American Canal to Imperial 

Investigati(m Yuma Mesa aiiiiiisa-y project 



Sl^fiOO 

3,000 
1,500 



Lateral system— Extension of lateral system to marginal lands 

Drainage system— Open drains 

Irrigable lands (Harm units)— Surveying and plotting marginal lands 

Permanent improvements— Three headquarters stations for ditch riders.. 
Operation and maintenance (public notice): 

Bard and Indian units (15,000 acres). 



Yuma Valley unit (50,000 acres}.. 
Maintenance of levees (38 miles). 



3,000 

25,000 

200 

2,400 

30,000 
90,000 
100,000 



Reimbursable accounts— Working fund for mess houses, hospitals, and railroad 
operations » 

Total 



2,000 



S6,000 
3,000 

25,000 

20O 

2,400 



220,000 
2,000 



258,600 



Operating costs and revenues, Yuma project, to Dec, SI, 1918, 





Calendar year 1918. 


To end of calendar year 1918. 




Operation. 


Mainte- 
nance. 


Total. 


Operation. 


Mainte- 
nance. 


Total. 


COSTS. 

Canal system: 

Laguna Dam and head- 
works 


$4,297.40 
3,726.39 


$779.07 
483,32 


$5,076.47 
4,209.71 


$11,706.20 
4,749.15 


$41,268.38 
1,250.13 


$52,974.68 


Hahi canal 


5; 999.28 


Lateral system: 

Bard unit 


8,023.79 


1,262.39 


9,286.18 


16,455.35 


42,518.61 


68,973.86 


4,203.96 
4,227.72 
27,208.51 


4,081.82 

7,687.20 

61,508.94 


8,286.78 
11,914.92 
88,n7.46 


61,991.96 
16,181.68 
27,208.51 


89,770.47 
37,263.17 
61,508.94 


141, 762. 4S 
53,444.85 


Jiidian unit 


Yuma VaUey unit 


88,717.46 


Drainage system: 

Indian reservation drain- 
age ,. , 


35,640.19 


73,277.96 


108,918.15 


95,382.15 


188,542.58 


283,924.73 


822.64 
3,454.36 




822.64 
3,454.36 


9,533.37 
3,454.36 


12,925.73 


22,459.10 


Yuma Valley drainage. .. . 




3,454.36 




4,277.00 




4,277.00 


12,987.73 


12,925.73 


25,913.46 


Flood protection: 

Indian resttvation levee ... 








39,620.66 
26,268.65 


39,520.66 
26,268.65 




39,520.66 
26,268.65 


39,620.66 
26,268.65 


Yuma Valley levee 










65, 789. 31 


(U 7R0.31 




65,789.31 


65,789.31 










Total 


47,940.98 


140,329.66 


188,270.64 


124,825.23 


309,776.13 


434,601.36 




REVENUES. 

Operation and maintenance 
charges accrued on contracts 
with water-right applicants. . 






59,478.35 
2,21L33 

986.69 

1,131.84 
66,616.39 

1,239.76 
1260.08 






177,848.37 
2,877.33 

1,626.81 

5,800.58 
56,616.80 

1,26L76 
1480.98 


Operation and maintenance 
charges paid and forfeited 
by water-right applicants. •. . 










Penalties on operation and 
maintenance charges ac- 
crued on contracts with 
wft t<>r-rlgh t appl lean ts . . .,.. 










Rentals of buJldiiigs during 
operating period 










Rentals ofirrigation water. . . . 










Other revenues unclassified, 
earned durmg operating 
period 










Less discount allowed on op- 
eration and maintenance 
charges accrued on contracts 
with water-right applicants 
(contra) 










Total 






121,404.18 






245,050.26 












Difference (defloit) 






66,866.46 






189,551.10 













1 Deduct. 



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CALIFOKlfIA, OELAVD PKOJECT. 

A. N. BuRCH, project manager, Orland, Calif. 
LOCATION. 

Counties: Glenn and Tehama; reservoir and storage feed canal in Colusa County. 

Townships: 21 to 23 N., Rs. 2 to 4 W., Mount Diablo meridian. 

Railroads and other transportation lines: Southern Pacific Railroad and steamers 
on Sacramento River. 

Railroad station and estimated population June 30, 1919: Orland, 1,550; railroad 
flag stations with freight sidetracks. Greenwood, Wyo, and Malton. 

WATER SUPPLY. 

Source of water supply, Stony Creek. 

Area of drainage l^sin: Above project diversion dams, 735 square miles; above 
feed canal diversion dam, 97 square nules; above East Park Dam (Little Stony), 102 
square miles. 

Annual run-off in acre-feet: Stony Creek, near Pruto (601 square miles), 1907 to 
1913— maximum, 940,000; minimum. 135,200; mean, 500,000. Little Stony Creek, 
at East Park Dam (102 square miles), 1907 to 1918— maximiun, 170,800; minimum, 
12,600; mean, 61,300. 

AGRIGTJLTTTBAL AND CLIMATIG CONDITIONS. 

Area for which the service is prepared to supply water, season of 1919: 20,533 
acres.' 
Area under water-right applications, season of 1919: 18,922 acres. 
Length of irrigation season. 1918: From April 1 to November 10 — 223 days. 
Average elevation of irrigaole area: 250 feet above sea level. 
Rainfall on irrigable area: 1883 to 1918 — average, 17 inches; 1918, 16.49 inches. 
Range of temperature on irrigable area: 26° to 114° F. 

Character of soil of iirigable area: Sandy and gravelly loam, silt loam, clay loam. 
Principal products: Alfalfa, milo, citrus and other fruits, nuts, and vegetables. 
Principal markets: San Francisco, Calif.; Portland, Greg.; eastern markets. 

LANDS OPENED FOB IBRIGATION. 

Dates of orders and public notices: April 26 and May 24, 1916; February 8 and 21, 
1917; March 22 and April 2, 1918. 

Location of lands opened: Tps. 21 and 22 N., R. 2 W.; Tps. 21, 22, and 23 N., 
R. 3 W.; Tps. 22 and 23 N., R. 4 W., Mount Diablo base and meridian. 

Limit of area of farm units: 40 acres, except that original subscribers are qualified 
to make water-right applications for an area not to exceed 160 acres. 

Building chaj^e per acre of irrigable land: $44. 

Charge per imgable acre, under supplemental contract for lining canals and laterals 
with concrete: $11. 

Annual operation and maintenance charge: $1.50 per irrigable acre, permitting 
delivery of 2i acre-feet of water; 50 cents for the first, 25 cents for the second, 15 
cents for the third, and 50 cents per acre-foot for all further quantities. 

GHBONOLOGIGAL SUMMABT. 

Reconnoissance and preliminary surveys made in 1906. 
Construction recommended by board of engineers November 12, 1906. 
Construction authorized by Secretary, October 5, 1907. 
First irrigation by Reclamation Service, season of 1910. 
East Park Dam completed July, 1910. 

1 Includes 320 acres of vested water rights and 46 acres of town and school sites. 
138554—19 7 97 



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98 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL KEPOBT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

Construction of East Park Feed Canal and second unit of the project authorized 
by Secretary July 25, 1913. 

East Park Feed Canal completed June 30, 1915. 

Entire project 81 per cent completed June 30, 1919, including supplemental con- 
struction. 

ntRIGATION PLAN. 

The irrigation plan of the Orland project provides for the storage of water in a reser- 
voir controlled by East Park Dam on Little Stony Creek, about 40 miles southwest of 
Orland, Calif., and a feed canal 7 miles long connecting the storage basin with Stony 
Creek. The diversion works for the feed canal are located about 3^ miles west of 
Ston3rford. For the irrigation of lands in the vicinity of Orland water is diverted 
from Stony Creek into the canal systems at two points — namely. Miller Buttes, 9) 
miles northwest of Orland, for the Soutlh Canal system, and at the north side weir, 
5 miles northwest of Orland, for the North Side Canal system. The South Cimal sys- 
tem is to irrigate 13,000 acres on the south side and the North Canal system 7,000 acres 
on the north side of Stony Creek. The stored water is conveyed from East Park in the 
natural creek channel 41 miles to the Miller Buttes diversion and 45 miles to the north 
side weir, where it is taken out in distribution systems comprising 128 miles of canals 
and laterals. The plan also includes a high-lme canal from which power may be 
developed for pumping. The United States intends, for* and in connection with the 
project, to use the waite, seepage, spring, and percolating water arising within the 
same, and asserts a right thereto by virtue of its reservation of all unappropriated waters 
of the project source of supply and of its appropriation of said waters in acc<miance 
with the State law heretofore made for the purposes of the project. 

The principal work now under way consists of placing concrete lining in the canal 
and lateral systems under a supplemental agreement with liie water users. 

The present limits of the Onand project may be considered as a unit of the Sacra- 
mento Valley project. It may be extended by constructing additional reservoirs on 
Stony Creek and its tributaries. The chief additional reservoir sites available are 
MUlsite, on Stony Creek, near Fnito; Briscoe, on Briscoe Creek, near Elk Creek; 
Stonyford, on Stony Creek, at Stonjrford, and Stony Gorge, on Stony Creek, near 
Elk Creek. 

SmOCABT OF GENERAL DATA FOB OBLAND PBOJECT TO END 
OF FISCAL YEAB 1919. 

Areas: 

Irrigable acreage when project is complete * 20, 533 

Private land June 30, 1919 »20,533 

Acreage service could have supplied in season of 1918 20, 533 

Estimated acreage service can supply in season 1919 20, 533 

Estimated acreage service can supply in season 1920 20, 533 

Acreage irrigated season of 1918 14, 764 

Acreage cropped under irrigation season of 1918 12,075 

Acreage d ry farmed season of 1918 2, 000 

Crops: 

Value of irrigated crops season of 1918 $709,172.00 

Value of irrigated crops per acre cropped 58.73 

Value of dry-farmed crops season of 1918 40,000. 00 

Value of dry-farmed crops per acre cropped 20. 00 

Finances: 

Net construction cost to June 30, 1919 920, 053. 69 

Per cent completed on June 30, 1919 81.00 

Appropriated for fiscal year 1920 113,000.00 

Estimated per cent complete by June 30, 1920 86.00 

Proposed appropriation for fiscal year 1921 120, 000. 00 

Estimated per cent complete by June 30, 1921... 93.00 

Announced construction charges per acre, {^^ementki: l^! 3 '^'^ 

1 Includes 320 acres vested rights and 46 acres town and school sites. 
* Includes supplemental construction. 



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CALIFOBNIA, OBLAND PROJECT. 99 

Finances — Continued. 

Appropriation fiscal year 1919 $95, 000. 00 

Increase of compensation 3, 162. 81 

Increase miscellaneous collections. 3, 140. 56 jj^q^ qaq qa 

Expenditures chargeable to 1919 appropriation: 

Disbursements 56 , 701 . 80 

Transfers 6, 210. 90 

Current liabilities 3, 839. 83 

Contingent liabilities 144.26 gg g^ ^g 

Unencumbered balance on July 1, 1919 34,406.57 

Repayments: 

Value of construction water^right contracts 1, 046, 033. 23 

Construction charges — 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 59, 437. 57 

Collected to June 30, 1919 59,437.57 

Operation and maintenance charges (public notice)— 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 56,728.36 

CoUected to June 30, 1919 56,728.36 

Water rental charges — 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 119,870.22 

Collected to June 30, 1919 119,600.22 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 270.00 

GONSTBUCTION DUBING FISGAIi YBAB. 

Lateral system. — Construction work in progress comprised the 
lining of the distribution system under supplemental agreement 
with the water users. It was planned during the year to do about 
25 per cent of the total of the work covered by the agreement, but 
owing to labor conditions during the first half of the year and to a 
shortage of available fimds, only about one-half of the work planned 
was completed. 

The following work was accomplished: 

Concrete lining (IJ inches thick) 2,464 cubic yards=58,882 square yards. 
Minor structures, 14. 

Surveys and investigations, — ^An examination of Stony Gorge dam 
site to determine its feasibility as regards f oimdations was made 
during the fall of 1918, and later a survey of the Millsite dam site was 
made. Theses sites control storage basins on Stony Creek. 

SBBPAGB AND DRAXNAGB. 

Drainage conditions on the project are favorable. In general the 
soil is porous, is entirely free from deleterious salts, and has good siu*- 
f ace and subsurface drainage. There are no seeped areas and no serious 
rising of ground water has occurred. The project is well supplied 
with natural drainage channels, and with proper care of these by 
the landowners when they prepare their land for irrigation practi- 
cally all danger from waterloggmg will be eliminated. 

Tlie drainage plans for the project provide for coordinating the 
work with the farmers as agnculturaT development advances, the 
problem consisting primarily of taking care of storm water diu"ing 
the winter season by building open drains where needed to connect 
with natural channels. IncioentaUy this will provide for any needed 
drainage diiring the irrigation season. As most of the project 



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100 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL BBPOKT OF EEC5LAMATI0N SBBVICE. 

requires little of this work, other than that which should be done by 
the fanners as a r^iilar part of their plans in preparing their lan<{s 
for irrigation, the situation can be l)est ana most economically 
handled in cooperation with the landowners as development proceeeds. 
Tins work was commenced in 1916 and will be contmued as occasion 
arises, utilizing a small amoimt of funds provided for this piu'pose 
in fixing the building cost of the project. 

BGONOIOES OF GOVERNMENT WORE/ 

There was an average increase of about 33 per cent in wages and 
20 per cent in cost oi materials over prewar times. The cost of 
worK done by Government forces increased 12 per cent. 

OPERATION AND MAINTBNANGB. 

The whole system, consisting of the storage works, feed canal, and 
138 miles of canals and laterals, was operated. 

Water for irrigation was turned in on April 1 and run until Novem- 
ber 30. The water supply was about one-half that usually available, 
due to the shortage of the natural flow which is depended on for 
early irrigation. This shortage was general throughout the State, 
the supply being lower than for any previous year for which records 
are available. There was also a shortage of about 10 per cent in 
the storage at East Park, and it became necessary to apportion the 
supply to the irrigated lands early in the season. Due to the limited 
water supply, it is estimated that there was a loss of 20 per cent in 
the alfalfa crop, although there was ample water for all other crops. 

There were no unusual conditions as regards maintenance work, 
and no renewals of any kind were required in connection with the 
upkeep of the system. 

Historical review , Orland project. 



Item. 



1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 


20,193 


t 20, 533 


» 20,533 


« 20,533 


8,928 


9,357 


12,729 


14,764 


115 


128 


138 


138 


48,000 


48,000 


51,000 


46,900 


52,000 


60,000 


74,000 


45,900 


30,300 
3.40 


38,100 


44,400 


28,300 


4.07 


3.50 


2.91 



1919 « 



Aorea^e for which service was prepannl to supply 

water 

Acreage irri^ted 

Ifiles of canal operated 

Water stored (acre-feet) 

Water diverted (acre-feet) , 

Water deliverod to land (acre-feet) 

Per acre of land irrigated (acre-feet) , 



s 20,533 
16,000 
140 
51,000 
75,000 
56,000 
3.50 



1 Estimated. 

'Includes 320 acres of vested water rights and 46 acres of town and school sites. 



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CALIFORNIA, ORLAKD PROJECT. 
SBTTLBKBNT AND DBVELOPMBNT. 



101 



Over one hundred new families settled in the project during the 
year. These, for the most part, purchased improved farms. Sxty- 
two new farms were developed for irrigation, and two thousand acres 
were added to the irrigated area. 

At the close of the &cal year bank deposits in the town of Orland 
were SI, 100,000, an increase of over S600,000 since 1916. 

Settlement data, Orland project. 



Item. 



1915 



1916 



.1917 



1918 



1919 



Total number of forms on project 

Population 

Number of irrigat ed farms 

Operated by owners 

Operated by tenants 

Population , 

Number of towns 

Population 

Total population 

Number of public schools 

Number of cliurches 

Number of banks 

Total capital stock 

Amount of deposits 

Number of deix)sitors , 



509 
l,fiOO 
351 
320 
31 
1,258 

1,500 

8,100 

8 

6 

2 

$141,000 

S395,000 

1,708 



500 
1,700 
384 
342 
42 
1,260 

1,550 

8,250 

8 

7 

2 

$141,000 

$445,000 

1,800 



099 

1,900 

531 

483 

48 

1,518 

1 

1,550 

3,450 

8 

7 

2 

$141,000 

$755,000 

2,420 



725 

2,000 

503 

549 

44 

1,589 

1,600 

8,600 

9 

7 

2 

$141,000 

$950,000 

2,800 



846 

2,000 

630 

580 

50 

1,600 

1 

1,650 

8,650 

9 

7 

2 

$141,000 

$1,100,000 

3,000 



PRINGIPAIi GROPS. 

There was an increase of 2,400 acres in the cropped area for the 
calendar year 1918. Alfalfa continued to predominate with an 
acreage oi 5,600. The next largest area was 3,000 acres of milo, 
which yielded 87,400 bushels of grain. There were also produced 
34,200 Dushels of barley, a crop little grown on the project lands 
since irrigation wiiter was available. Although the estimated yield 
of alfalfa was 1,500 tons less than for 1917, returns for the crop 
were greater owing to increased prices. Returns from fruit and 
nuts were comparatively small as few orchards have reached the 
bearing age. Two experimental plots of cotton were planted from 
which encoura^ng results were obtained. The imit prices for all 
crops were greater than for the previous year, the estimated returns 
for the cropped area being $58.73 per acre. 

Dairying and live-stock production continued to be the principal 
industries of the project. 

The inventory for stock and equipment shows a present value of 
$638,000, an increase of $89,000 for the year. 



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102 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAIi REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 
Crop report, Orland project, California, 1918. 



Crop. 



Area 

(acres). 



Unit of 
yield. 



Yields. 



Total. 



Average 
per acre. 



Values. 



Per unit 
of yield. 



Total. 



Per acre. 



Alfalfa hay 

Other hay 

Pasture 

Com, sorghum 

Wheat 

Barley 

Almocids 

Cttms fruits 

Dedduous fruits 1 

Small fruits 

Prunes, dried 

Garden 

Nursery 

Miscellaneous 

Less duplicated areas 

Total cropped acre- 
age. 



Irrinted, no crop: 

Nonbearing orchard. , 

Young alCufa 

Not cropped 

Less duplicated areas 

Total irrigated 
acreage. 



5,614 

850 

3,225 

3,014 

80 

1,257 

266 

•121 

132 

6 

47 

273 

20 

172 

3,011 



12,075 



1,753 
712 
773 
540 



14,764 



Ton-. 
...do.. 



24,000 
1,200 



4.3 
1.4 



116.00 
18.00 



Bushel.. 
..do.... 
..do.... 
Pound., 
..do.... 
..do.... 
..do..... 
..do.... 



87,406 

1,852 

34,220 

106,400 

70,000 

217,800 

6,450 

70,500 



20.0 

23.2 

27.2 

400.0 

578.5 

1,660.0 

1,075.0 

1,500.0 



1.80 
2.20 
1.00 
.224 
.07 
.01 
.10 



$384,000 

21,600 

18,835 

157,331 

4,074 

34,220 

23,040 

4,000 

8,712 

045 

7,050 

24,215 

11,000 

8,650 



168.40 
25.16 
5.84 
52.20 
50.03 
27.22 
00.00 
40.60 
66.00 

107.50 

150.00 
88.70 

5SO.0O 
50.29 



Total and average. 



700,172 



68.78 



Areas. 



Irrigable area farms reported 

Irrigated area fiarms reported 

Under water-rights applications 

Under rental contracts 

Under vested rights 

Cropped area fiiuins reported 



Acres. 



16,000 
14,764 
14,524 
80 
160 
12,075 



Farms. 



503 
503 
501 



2 
503 



Per 
cent of 
project. 



80.0 
73.8 
72.6 



.8 
60.2 



1 Small mixed orchards. 



FINANCIAL STATBMENT. 

Conden$ed balance sJieet, Orland project, June SO, 1919, 

Inventory of material and supplies 65,326.00 

Accounts receivable: 

Current accounts due $208.64 

CoDStruotion water-right charges unaccrued 086,505.66 

086,80180 

Gross ooDStructioQ cost 1,048,208.20 

Less oonstruction revenue earnings 128, 244. 51 

Net oonstmctlon cost 020,053.60 

Gross operation and maintenance cost 77, 512. 38 

Less operation and maintenance revenues 1, 807. 70 

•^ ! 75, 614. 68 

Undelivered orders 144.26 

Accounts payable 3,880.83 

Continiient obli^tions 144. 26 

CoUeotlons and contracts of speoiflo amounts for repayments to reclamation fund 1, 103, 557. 21 

Capital investment: 

Disbursement, transfer, and Joint construction vouchers received 1, 142, 775. 82 

Collection, transfer, ana Joint construction vouchers issued 262, 285. 10 

Net investment 880,40a72 



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CAUFOBNIA, ORLAND PBOJECT. 

Feature costs of Orland project to June SO, 1919. 



108 




Total to JuiM 
30, 1010. 



EzaminAtions and survevs: 
Experimental investieations . 
Investigatioins unused sites. . . 



Storage system: 

East Park Reservoir surveys 



East Park Dam, spillway, and dikes. 

Bast Park Reservoir, clearing site 

East Park spiUway .•... 

East Park feed canal 

Diversion dam 

Head works 

Salt Creek siphon 

Terminal chute 

Salt Creek diute 

County road bridges 

Minor structures 

Culverts 

Raising spillway, Fast Park Dam 

East Park feed canal, concrete lining . . 
East Park Dam, additional gates 



Canal system: 

North Canal 

South Canal 

South diversion dam 

South diversion conduit 

South diversion headgates 

South diversion sluiceway 

North diversion dam 

North diversion hcAdworks . . . 
High Une canal: 

South 

Flume 

Chute 

Concrete Untng 

South Canal railroad crossing. . 
South Canal excavating plant . 



Lateral system: 

Laterals and sublaterals 

Minor structures— 

Concrete. 

Pipe 

Timber 

Metal 

l|-indi concrete lining 

2i-inch pipe line on lateral 13 

Railroaa crossings under Southern Padflc tracks . 



3.98 

283.07 
04.16 
fiO.36 



Flood protection, levees and dikes 

Farm units 

Permanent improvements: 

Buildings and permanent improvements 

Power line, dismantled .-. 

Supplemental construction: 

ll-inch concrete Untng, canal system 

l|-inch concrete lining, lateral system 

Operation and maintenance during construction . 

Gross cost of construction features 

Plant accounts 

Unadjusted clearing accounts 



Gross construction cost. . 



Less revenues accrued during construction period: 

Rentals of buildings 

Rentals of miiag and farming lands 

Rentals of irrigation water 

Contractors' freight refunds 

Other revenues unclassified 

Loss on hospital operations 



400.51 



8,046.76 
13,577.00 



37,005.60 



27,005.60 



740.00 



203.08 



Net oonstruotion cost to June 30, 1010. 



545.07 
27,450.53 



110,360.11 
456.40 



10,825.60 



4,060.84 
154,002.40 
88,460.02 
30,470.70 
01,186.23 
24,367.01 
6,704.16 
4,747.74 
5,610.23 
3,463.45 
3,350.01 
3,137.47 
4,642.08 
11,431.83 
18,3U.88 
1,338.06 



453,303.06 



24,600.06 
66,860.08 
26,060.06 
1,707.88 
4,242.55 
5,040.76 
3,006.54 
1,237.04 

21,172.61 
7^074.07 
2,178.28 
1,890.06 
673.45 
4,016.21 



171,502.24 



88,427.27 

50,807.11 

6,300.53 

2,245.14 

146.63 

06,077.68 
2,648.51 
6,251.43 



360,004.30 



400.73 
1,360.50 

15,043.47 
371.73 



8,646.75 

13,577.00 

107,657.33 



1,043,58L67 

4,623.33 

04.21 



1,048,298.20 



1,064.00 
4,317.00 
110,000.22 
1,829.82 
1,053.47 



128,244.51 
030,053.60 



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104 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL BEPOBT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 
Cost statement by calendar years, Orland project. 





Construc- 
tion. 


Operation and maintenance. 




YearendingDec.31— 


During 
construc- 
tion. 


Under 
public 
notice. 


Total. 


Total ooBt. 


1006 


$7,213.10 
48,106.71 
117,351.53 
113,088.22 
173,150.82 
74,414.07 
16,488.02 
20,564.35 
177,080.08 
05,401.76 
34,034.80 
14,370.70 
15,760.58 
18,880.81 








$7,213.10 


1907 ... 








48,106.71 


1008 








117,351.53 


1900 . . . 








113,968.22 
174,616.70 
85,827.31 


1910 


$1,456.88 
11,412.34 
18,342.71 
17.229.28 
19,814.16 
19,292.40 
24,444.74 
14,332.88 
12.40 




$1,456.88 
11,412.34 
18,342171 
17,229.28 
19,814.16 
19,202.40 
24,444.74 
27,178.08 
31,081.30 
14,017.63 


1911 




1012 




34,831.63 


1913 




46,703.63 
106,003.24 


1014 




1015 




114,784.16 


1016 




68,470.64 
41,657.78 


1017 


$31,510.96 
31,083.79 
14,917.63 


1018 


46,841.07 


Jan. 1 to June 30, 1010 


33,796.44 










Subtotal 


935,924.44 

4,622.32 

94.21 


1 




1,121,004.06 
4,622.32 


Plant mjoonnts June 30, 1010 


I 




Unadjusted clearing accounts 


1 




94.21 










Total 


940,640.97 


107,657.23 77.512.38 


185,160.61 


1,125,810.58 






' 





1 Deduct. 
Cost statement by fiscal years, Orland project. 





Construe- 
tion. 


Operation and maintenance. 




Year ending June 30— 


During 
construc- 
tion. 


Under 
public 
notice. 


Total. 


Total cost. 


1006. .. 


$276. 73 
10,019.66 

126,711.08 
59,402.42 

199,568.73 

103,524.38 
45,533.68 
11,780.79 
61,160.78 

203,470.40 
54,947.66 
21,684.91 
9, 847. 62 
27,995.60 








$276.73 


1907 








10,019.66 


1908. 








126,711.08 


1909 








69,402.42 


1910 . . 


$1,356.18 
4,141.36 
17,019.73 
20,872.72 
15,266.26 
20,240.24 
20,257.74 
13, 127. « 
14,624.43 




$1,356.18 
4,141.36 
17,019.73 
20,872.72 
15,286.26 
20,240.24 
20,257.74 
25,174.05 
29,696.41 
31,144.92 


200,924.01 


1911 




107,665.74 


1912 




62,553.41 


1913 




32,653.51 


1914 




76,437.04 


1915 




223,710.64 


1916 




75,205.40 


1917 


$12,046.62 
34,320.84 
31,144.92 


46,858.06 


1918 


30,544.03 


1919 


50,140.52 








Subtotal 


935,924.44 

4,622.32 

94.21 








1,121,004.05 


Plant accounts June 30, 1919 








4,622.32 


Unadjusted clearing accounts 








04.21 








*••; 




Total 


940,640.97 


107,657.23 


77,512.38 


185,169.61 


1,125,810.58 







L Deduct. 



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CALIFORNIA, ORLAND PROJECT. 105 

Estimated cost of contemplated work, Orland project ^ during fiscal yeof 1920, 



FeatuTM. 



Estimated cost during 
fiscal year 1920. 



Sub- 
feature. 



Principal 
feature. 



Examination and surve; 
Canal system: r 
Lattfaisystem 



a: Concrete 



lining. 



Excavation and minor structures.. 
Concrete lining 



9500 
6,400 



Operation and maintenance under public notice . . 
fieimbursable accounts 



Total.. 



$400 
20,000 



6,900 

39,000 

1,500 



67,800 



Operating cost and revenues, Orland project, to Dec. SI, 1918. 





Calendar year 1918. 


To end of calendar year 1918. 




Operation. 


Mainte- 
nance. 


Total. 


Operation. 


Mainte- 
nance. 


Total. 


COST. 

Storage works: 

East Park Dam 


11,314.10 
702.38 


14,750.69 
399.30 


$6,073.79 
1,101.6$ 


$3,051.11 
1,143.44 


$7,743.45 
1,228.86 


$10,794.56 


East Park feed canal 


2,372.30 




2,016.48 


6,158.99 


7,176.47 


4,194.55 


8,972.31 


18,166.86 


Canal system: 

North diversion dam 




26.00 

ia7i 


26.60 
12.78 


20.22 
2.07 


30.88 
86.13 


51.10 


South diversion dam 


2.07 


88.20 




2.07 


37.31 


39.38 


22.29 


117.01 139.30 


Lateral system: 

Korthside 


2,749.62 
5,779.49 


6.547.43 
7,630.19 


8,297.05 
13,409.68 


5,425.84 
11,328.84 


9,637.37 
18,067.29 


14,963.21 


Southside 


29,396.13 








8,529.11 


13,177.62 


21,706.73 


16,754.68 


27,604.66 


44.359.34 


Adiudlcation of water rights 
ajone Stonv r*reek . 




2,089.13 


2,089.13 
73.08 




4,729.96 
58.62 


4,729.96 


Farming operations, loss 


73.08 


140.67 


199.29 






Total 


10, 62a 74 


20,463.05 


31,0S3.79 


21,112.19 


41,482.56 


62,504.75 






BKV1CKUC8. 

Operation and maintenance 
charges accrued on contracts 
with water-ngbt applicants. 

Penalties on operation and 
maintenance charges ac- 
crued on contracts with 
water-right applicants 






30. 25a 88 

3.92 

24a 00 
15a 00 

59.96 
1 1,305.28 






56,728.36 
3.92 










Rental of luid and buildings 
during operating period 










48a 00 


Rentals of Irriffation water 










5iaoo 


Other revenues imclassifled 
earned during operating 
period 










213.43 


Less discount allowed on oper- 
ation and maintenance 
charges accrued on contracts 
with water-right applicants 
(ctmtra) 










1 1,306.28 














Total 






29.399.48 






56, 63a 43 




















1,684.31 






3,964.32 
















> Deduct. 



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COLOBADO, OEAVD VALLET PBOJECT. 

S. 0. Harper, project manager, Grand Junction, Colo. 

LOCATION. 

County: Mesa. 

Townships: 1 N., Rs. 1 E. and 1 to 3 W.; 2 N., Rs. 2 and 3 W.; 1 S., Ra. 1 E. and 
1 W., Ute meridian. 9 S., Rs. 101 to 104 W.; 10 S., Rs. 98, 101, and 103 W.; 11 S., 
Rs. 98 and 99 W., sixth principal meridian. 

Railroads: Denver & Rio Grande; Grand River Valley. 

Railroad stations and estimated population, June 30, 1919: Palisade, 900; Clifton, 
200; Grand Junction, 9,000; Fruita, 1,000; Loma, 40; Mack, 75. 

WATEB SUPPLY. 

Source of water supply: Grand River. 

Area of drainage basin: 8,550 square miles above Palisade. 

Annual run-on in acre-feet of Grand River at Palisade, 1902 to 1918: Maximum, 
5,466,600; minimum, 2,300,000: mean, 3,801,000. 

Discharge, in second-feet, of Grand River at Palisade, 1902 to 1918: Maximum,. 
50,000; minimum, 1,100. 

AGBIOXTLTUBAL AND CLIMATIC CONDITIONS. 

Area for which the Service is prepared to supply water, season of 1919: 43,400 acres. 

Area under rental contracts season 1919 (to June 30): 17,500 acres. 

Area in Palisade and Mesa County irrigation districts under special contracts, season 
of 1919: 8,^)0 acres. 

Length of irrigation season: From April 1 to October 31, 214 days. 

Average elevation of irrigable area: 4,700 feet above sea level. 

Rainfall on irrigable area: For 26 years, average, 8.30 inches; 1918, 9 inches. 

Range of temperature on irrigable area: —15® to 100** F. 

Character of soil on irrigable area: Sandy loam, sandy mesas, and adobe. 

Principal products: Alfijfa, sugar beets, grain, fruit, vegetables. 

Principal markets: Large cities east of Rocky Mountains for fruit; other products, 
local. 

LANDS OPENED FOB IBBIGATION. 

Dates of orders: January 25, 1917; February 21, 1918; March 25, 1919. 

Location of lands opened: Tps. 1, Rs. 1 and 2 W.; 2 N., Rs. 2 and 3 W.; 9 S., Ra. 
103 and 104 W. 

Limit of area of farm units: 40 to 80 acres. 

Duty of water: 3.5 acre-feet per acre per annum at the farm. 

Charges per acre of irrigable land: No lands have been opened under public notice 
and the building charge has not been announced. Water is fumishea on a rental 
basis at the rate of 50 cents per acre-foot delivered at the farm. 

In addition to the project lands, the service furnishes, beginning with the season 
of 1919, 120 second-feet of water for 8,400 acres included in the Palisade and Mesa 
County irrigation districts under special contracts with these districts. 

CHBONOLOGIOAL SUMMARY. 

Recormoissance and preliminary surveys begun in September, 1902. 
Construction recommended by board of engineers December 15, 1908. 
Purchase of rights of way authorized by Secretary November 4, 1911. 
Construction authorized by Secretary September 23, 1912. 
First irri^tion by Reclamation Service season of 1915. 

C<x)perative drainage work in Grand Valley drainage district begun March, 1918. 
Price-Stub pumping plant completed and water supplied to Palisade and Mesa 
County irrigation aistricts April, 1919. 
Entire project 80.3 per cent completed June 30, 1919. 

106 



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COLORADO, GRAND VALLEY PROJECT. 107 

ntBIGATION PLAN. 

The irrigation plan of the Grand Valley project provides for the diversion of water 
from the Grand River by means of a diversion dam located about 8 miles northeast 
of Palisade, Colo., into a canal system on the north side of the river for the irrigation 
of lands lying north and west of Grand Junction, Fruita, and Mack^ Colo. About 
40,000 acres will be supplied by gravity and 10,000 acres by electrically operated 
pumping plants to be located on the gravity canal. Power for pumping will be 
developed in a power plant to be located at the upper portal of Tunnel No. 3. On 
the first 6 miles of the main canal located in the canyon of the Grand River there 
are three tunnels, respectively, 3,723, 1,656, and 7,292 feet long. The United States 
claims all waste, seepage, spring, and percolating water arising within the project, 
and proposes to use such water in connection therewith. 

The diver«ion dam, the first 55 miles of the main canal, and the lateral system to 
serve 35,000 acres of the gravity unit of the project have been completed, with the 
exception of a few sublaterals and a large number of tiimouts and weirs, which will 
be installed as needed. A pumping plant and other works to supply 8,400 acres in 
the PaUsade and Mesa County irrigation districts have also been completed. 

There remain to be completed &e last 7 miles of the main canal, laterals to serve 
5,000 acres of the gravitv unit, the power and pumping systems, and such drainage 
and flood protection works as may be required. 

SXTMXABY OF GBNEBAL DATA FOB GBAND VALLBY PBOJBCT 
TO BND OF FISCAL YBAB 1919. 

Areas: 

Irrigable acreage when project is complete 50,000 

Public land entered to June 30, 1919 13, 991 

Public land open to entry on June 30, 1919 1, 015 

Public land withdrawn on June 30, 1919 14, 064 

Private land June 30, 1919 20,930 

Acreage service could have supplied in season of 1918 35, 000 

Estimated acreage service can supply in season 1919 * 43, 400 

Estmated acreage service can supply in season 1920 f . . M3, 400 

Acreage irrigated season of 1918 8, 102 

Acreage cropped under irrigation season of 1918 6, 387 

Crops: 

Value of irrigated crops season of 1918 t $414, 310. 00 

Value of irrigated crops per acre cropped 64.87 

Finances: — ' 

Net construction cost to June 30, 1919 $3, 489, 981. 30 

Per cent completed on June 30, 1919 80. 3 

Appropriated for fiscal year 1920 $192, 000. 00 

Estmiated per cent complete by June 30, 1920 84. 6 

Proposed appropriation tor fiscal year 1921 $208, 000. 00 

Estmiated per cent complete by June 30, 1921 88. 

Appropriation fiscal year 1919 $348,000.00 

Deducted under 10 per cent provision 21, 000. 00 

Increase, miscellaneous collections 28,848.34 

Increased compensation 13, 003. 57 

$368,85L91 

Expenditures chargeable to 1919 appropriation: 

Disbursements $225, 548. 69 

Transfers 18, 257. 86 

Current liabilities 44,072.00 

287,878.55 

Unencumbered balance on July 1, 1919 80,973.36 

Repayments: 

Water rental charges — 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 43, 495. 95 

Collected to June 30, 1919 39, 753. 13 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 3, 742. 82 

(Includes Mesa County and Palisade irrigation districts, 8,400 acres. 



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108 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL BBPOKT OF KECLAMATION SERVICE. 

Drainage: 

Estiinated acreage damaged by seepage to June 30, 1919 30, 400 

Miles of drains built to June 30, 1919 — 

Open 20. 

Closed 1. 6 

Total 21.6 

Estimated acreage protected by drains to June 30, 1919 5, 150 

Estimated acreage to be protected by authorized system 10, 200 

Cost of drainage works to June 30, 1919 $197, 639. 66 

Includes work performed in Grand Valley drainage district. 

CONSTBUOTION DTTBINa FISCAL YBAB. 

Grand River Dam. — ^No construction work was performed on this 
feature during the fiscal year, but the operating force completed the 
loading of the remaining second-hand equipment, the dismantling 
of the camp buildings, and the cleaning up of the site. 

Canal system. — ^The only work undertaken on the canal system 
was in connection with the construction of the Price-Stub pumping 
plant and other facilities to supply the Palisade and Mesa C!ountv 
irrigation districts. The construction of the pumping plant, which 
is located at station 327 of the main canal near the lower portal of 
tunnel No. 3, was begun in January, 1919, and completed far enough 
to permit its operation, to be commenced on April 14, 1919. This 
plant consists of a vertical turbine, direct connected to a centrifugal 

Jump, utilizing 80 second-feet of water which is delivered to uie 
'rice ditch, of the Palisade irrigation district, through a fall of 17 feet 
to pump 25 second-feet of water against a 31-foot head into the Stub 
ditch, of the Mesa County irrigation district. The plant was given 
a final test in June, which indicated a maximum total efficiency of 
68.4 per cent. The construction of this plant involved the excavation 
of 4,300 cubic yards of material in the intake structure, powerhouse 
foundations, and tail race and the placing of 375 cubic yards of con- 
crete in the check, penstock, and powerhouse. 

Six headgates were installed in the main canal through the Mesa 
County district for supplying the lands which could be watered by 
gravity, and one check, containing 84 cubic yards of concrete, was 
also constructed at station 660 of the main canal. 

Lateral system. — ^Work on the lateral system during the year was 
confined to the construction of lateral extensions as required to supply 
new lands, and the installation of the necessary turnouts, weirs, 
and other minor structures. This work involved the excavation of 
5,000 cubic yards of earth and the installation of 11 drops, 33 cul- 
verts, 32 checks, 6 flumes, 11 bridges, 1 siphon, 67 turnouts, and 108 
weirs. 

Surveys. — ^The irrigable area survey of the project was continued 
throughout the year. All field work on the gravity unit was com- 
pleted, and the office work on inking and tracing the sheets and com- 
5uting the areas was also practically complete at the end of the year. 
*he total area covered by this survey to date is 48,000 acres. 

SEBPAGB AND DBAINAGB. 

Project lands. — ^The seepage which first developed with the operation 
of the irrigation system was due principally to leakage through shale 
cuts in the main canal. The area affected from this source has been 



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CX)LORADO, GRAKD VALLEY PROJECT. 109 

practically stationary during the year and in some parts of the pro- 
ject has slightly decreased on account of the silting up of the canal. 
With the increase of irrigation on the project, however, the water table 
is beginning to rise in a few new localities, and it is apparent that 
construction of a number of drains will have to be undertaken in the 
near futxu^ to protect some of the most valuable lands on the project. 
The total area of seeped land on the project has increased during the 
year from 225 to 400 acres. One short open drain 2,000 feet in length 
was constructed to protect an area in sec. 16, T. 1 N., R. 1 W., Ute 
meridian. Investigations of the seeped areas on the project are in 
progress, and plans are being made for all drains which it may be 
necessary to construct in the near future. 

Cocrperative drainage in Grand VaUey drainage district, — ^The con- 
struction of the cooperative drainage system m the Grand Valley 
drainage district has been continued during the year with three 
drag*line excavators and one trenching machine. The work was 
retarded by the extreme shortage of labor, but in spite of this con- 
dition fair progress was made. The work completed during the 
year consisted of 16.4 miles of open drain, involving the excavation 
of 389,381 cubic yards of material. Five railroad cmverts were com- 
pleted, involving the placing of 370 cubic vards of concrete ; and 
11 highwav bridges, 3 irrigation flumes, and 174 minor structures 
were installed. The use of a considerable mileage of tile drains was 
contemplated in the original contract with the district, but after 
the construction of a sm^l amount of this type of drain, on account 
of the excessive cost and doubtful efficiency, it was decided to revise 
the plans to provide for the use of open drains in all cases, and a 
supplemental agreement was entered into with the district covering 
this change. 

niBIGATION DISTRICTS. 

The contracts with the Palisade and Mesa County irrigation dis- 
tricts which were entered into in June, 1918, were confirmed by the 
district court on October 14, 1918. These contracts provide for 
delivering 120 second-feet of irrigation water to the districts through 
the worKS of the project and for the surrender to the United States 
of their power water ri^ts amoimting to 1,200 second-feet of the.flow 
of the Grand River. Further negotiations with the Orchard Mesa 
district were had during the year looking toward the inclusion of this 
district in the project. A revised report and estimate of cost of 
reconstructing the irrigation system of this district was prepared in 
August, 1918, and reviewed by a board of engineers in Jxme,1919. 
At the end of the year no definite progress had been made toward 
the taking over of the irrigation district and its rehabilitatfon by 
the United States. 

BOABD MEETINGS. 



Date. 


Topic. 


Personnel. 


June 2-e, 1919 


/Report on reconstruction of Orchard Mesa Irrigation 
\ district. 


(James Munn. 
<C. T. Pease. 




(j. L. Lytel. 



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110 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SBRVIOB. 
OPBBATION AND MAINTENANCB. 

The irrigation system operated during the season of 1918 consisted 
of the first 55 miles of the main canal and 113 miles of laterals. 
The area actually irrigated consisted of 8,102 acres widely scattered 
through the project, making it necessary to operate practically the 
entire irrigation system to permit delivery of water to each of the 
farms under irrigation. Water was turned into the main canal on 
March 27, 1918, and shut out on November 15, the operation being 
extended for 15 days beyond the close of the regular season at the 
urgent request of a number of the new settlers who had not completed 
their cisterns in time to store their winter's water supply. Water 
was furnished throughout the season to the project lands on '' supply 
on demand ' ' basis at the rate of 50 cents per acre-foot. Five himdred 
and twelve acres of land in the Mesa County district were also fur- 
nished with a supplemental water supply under special contracts. 
The total quantity of water delivered to farms was 29,856 acre-feet, 
with a duty of 3.68 acre-feet per acre. 

No difficulties were experienced in operating the system and water 
was not shut out of the main canal for a single day during the season. 
Russian thistles which blow into the main canal and laterals in large 
quantities interfered at times with the uniform delivery of water 
and the extreme scarcity of competent men to fiU ditch riders' positions 
also made it difficult to furnisn as satisfactory service as could be 
desired. The operation and maintenance force was employed 
during the irrigation season in patroling the canals, regulating the 
delivery of water, performing minor repair work, and installing 
turnouts and measuring devices. During the nonirrigation season 
the same force was engaged in cleaning canals and laterals, burning 
weeds, instedling new structures, and performing miscellaneous 
repair work. 

beginning with the season of 1919 water was supplied to a con- 
siderably increased acreage on the project as well as to the lands in 
the Palisade and Mesa County irrigation districts. This necessitated 
running a much larger head in the canal than had been carried in 
previous years and some difficulty was experienced with portions of 
the canal banks which had not been previously seasoned and puddled. 
One break occurred on May 25 on the canyon division of the main 
canal, which caused a two-days' interruption of water service and 
washed out a short ection of the roadbed of the Denver and Rio 
Grande Railroad. A number of small leaks were discovered at 
different times, which were prevented from developing into serious 
breaks by the vigilance of the operating force. The interruption 
in service on account of these difficulties, however, was not serious 
and the loss and inconvenience from shortage of water were very 
slight. 



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COLORADO, GRAND VALLEY PROJECT. 
HUtorical review, Grand Valley project. 



111 



Item. 



1916 



W17 



1918 



1919 



Acreage for which service was prepared to supply water 

Acreage irrigated 

Miles of canal operated 

Water diverted (aore-f eet ) 

Water delivered to land (aore-feet) 

Per acre of land Irrigated (acr©-feet) 



15,000 
1,741.6 

80 
30,813 
4.224 
2.42 



35,000 
5,289 

150.5 
55,891 
18,715 
3.54 



35,000 
8,102 
168 
74,852 
29,856 
3.68 



143,400 
122,400 



1 Estimated and Includes Palisade and Mesa County irrigation districts, 8) 400 acres. 

SETTLEMENT. 

Settlement of the project progressed rather slowly during the year, 
principally on account of tne abnormal conditions due to the war 
and the extreme difficulty of securing labor for farm work. Con- 
siderable activity, however, has been noted in the western section of 
the project and the development, although not as rapid as hoped for, 
is proceeding on a conservative basis. R-actically all of the desirable 
puolic lands under the project have been taken up and settlement 
activities were confined to the purchase of private lands and relin- 
quishments. Sales of private lands have Tbeen limited but there 
have been a large number of transfers of relinquishments and assign- 
ments of excess units. The lands on the project are still held at very 
reasonable prices, and although settlement and development are not 

}>roceeding as rapidly as might be desired, the outlook is encouraging 
or the^ future. 

Settlement data, Orand Valley project. 



Item. 



1916 


1917 


1918 


900 


900 


900 


200 


480 


759 


76 


202 


317 


50 


97 


186 


26 


105 


131 


168 


480 


759 


>6 


»6 


»6 


« 10,800 


» 10,700 


no, 700 


MO, 968 


« 11, 180 


Ml, 450 


«24 


»24 


«20 


«28 


«28 


«28 


»7 


»7 


M 


< 1387, 000 


s Mil, 000 


t $432, 000 


« 12, 484, 761 


«», 526,675 


«$3,030,621 


«7,260 


«7,462 


«8,681 



1919 



Total number of (arms on project 

Population. 

Number of irrigated farms 

Operated by owners or managers. . . 

Operated by tenants 

Populfttian ^ 

Number of towns 

Population. 

Total i;>opulatian in towns and on farms. 

Number of public schools 

Number of churches 

Number of banks 

Total capital stock 

Total amount of deposits 

Total number of depositors 



900 
1900 
1350 



1 Estimated. 



* These items on lands adjacent to project. 
CBOPS. 



The season of 1918 was about normal as far as weather conditions 
were concerned. The spring was somewhat late and was followed 
by a period of drought in April and May, which left the ground very 
dry and made it somewhat difficult to secure a good stand of some 
crops. The summer was warm and very favorable for crop growth 
anci the long growing season in the fall before the first killing frost, 
on October 26, was especially favorable for harvesting late crops. 
The total area crojpped was 6,387 acres, an increase of about 40 per 
cent over the previous season. The gross value of the crops produced 



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112 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPOKT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

during the season amounted to $414,310, an average of $65 per acre. 
Sugar beets constituted the principal crop on tne project, being 
valued at $112,940. Apples, alfalfa, wheat, corn, peaches, potatoes, 
beans, pears, oats, and tomatoes were the other important crops, in 
the order named. There was a large increase in the acreage planted 
to alfalfa during the season and this crop is growing in importance. 
With the increase in the alfalfa acreage a marked increase in the 
number of live stock on the project is also noted and most of the new 
farmers are getting a good start in diversified farming combined 
with dairying and stock raising. The sugar-beet crop returns were 
very satisfactory and the project lands seem especially well adapted 
for the successful production of this crop. 

The prospects for the season of 1919 are excellent. The first 
cutting of alfalfa was above the average in yield and quality. The 
yield of winter wheat was ven^ satisfactory and all crops as a rule 
are in excellent condition. It is estimated that the area under 
cultivation on the project has been increased to 12,000 acres. 

Crop report, Chrand Valley project, Colorado^ year of 1918, 



Crop. 



Alfalfa, hay 

Apples 

Barley 

Beans 

Beets, sugar 

Beet tops 

Com, Indian. 

Com, fodder 

Fmits, small 

Oarden 

Hay 

Oats 

Pasture 

Peaches 

Pears 

Potatoes 

Straw 

Tomatoes 

Wheat 

Miscellaneous 

Less duplicated areas. . . 

Total cropped acreage 



Irrigated, no crop: 

Nonbearing orchard . . 

Young alfalfa 

Ground fall-plowed. . . 
Less duplicated areas. 



Total Irrigated 
acreage 



Area 

(acres). 



968 

512 

40 

238 

1,042 

1,042 

749 

682 

14 

30 

94 

471 

113 

70 

115 

205 

2,101 

81 

1,630 

54 

3,873 



6,387 



57 

700 

1,658 

700 



8,102 



Yields. 



Unit of 
yield. 



Values. 



Total. 



Ton 

Pound. 
Bushel. 
..do... 
Ton 



Bushel. 
Ton. . . . 
Pound. 



Ton 

Bushel. 



Pound . 
...do... 
Bushel. 
Ton, . . . 
...do... 
Bushel. 



2,708 

2,753,930 

396 

2,970 

11,204 



17,342 

1,527 

25,500 



152 
10,302 



562,210 

645,286 

19,465 

1,138 

647 

22,742 



Average ! Per unit 
per acre, of yield. 



2.8 I $17.94 
5,379 .0195 

8.1 , 1.65 
12.5 , 5.94 
10.8 10.00 



23.2 
2.2 
1,821 



L6 
21.9 



8,032 

5,611 

95 

.5 

8 

14 



1.83 
6.14 
.039 



14.31 
L02 



.041 
.027 
.92 

4.00 
14.00 

1.89 



Total and average. 



Total. 



$48,643 

53,714 

655 

17,641 

112,940 

6,252 

31,774 

9,373 

1,000 

2,712 

2,174 

10,522 

557 

22,830 

17,160 

17,833 

4,552 

9,058 

43,097 

1,833 



414,310 



Per acre. 



$50. 2& 

104.91 

13.36 

74. OS 

108.39 

6.00 

42.42 

13.74 

7L43 

90.43 

23.13 

32.34 

4.93 

336.14 

149.13 

86.09 

2.15 

111.83 

36.44 

33.96 



64.87 



Areas. 



Total irrigable area farms reported . 
Total irrigated area farms reported 

Under rental contracts 

Total cropped area farms reported. 



Acres. 



13,734 

8,102 
8,102 
6,387 



Farms. 



Percent 

of 
project.! 



317 
309 
309 
276 



37.6 
16.3 
16.3 
13.8 



1 50,000 acres (estimated). 



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COLORADO, GRAND VALLEY PROJECT. 118 

PUBLIC NOTICES AND OBDBBS. 
ORDER, MARCH 25, 1919. 

1. Order of Febmftry 21, 1918, amended. — Notice is hereby given 
that the order of February 21, 1918, opening lands on the Grand 
Valley project, Colorado, is modified in respect to the application of 
the initial payment of $3 per acre required to be paid m pursuance 
of said order, as a minimum charge for water of $1 per irrigable acre 
for each of the years 1918, 1919, and 1920, so as to provide that when 
lands have been, or hereafter are, entered after September 1 of any 
year, and therefore do not secm*e the benefits of water for irrigation 
purposes in that year, the payment of the $3 per acre made at the time 
of entry will be applied as a credit to the minimiun water-rental 
charges, or the mmimiun operation and maintenance charges, for 
the three-year period b^inning with the year following that in 
which entry was made, in accordance with the minimiun charges 
which have been, or hereafter may be, established bv the Secretary 
of the Interior for similar lands on the project. For lands whicn 
have been, or hereafter are entered on or oefore September 1 of any 
year the said payment of $3 per acre will be apphed as a credit to 
the minimum water-rental charges, or the minimum operation and 
maintenance charges, b^inning with the year in which the entry 
was made. 

S. G. Hopkins, 
Assistant Secretary of the Interior. 

FINANCIAL STATBMBNT. 

Condensed balance shut, Grand Valley project, June SO, 1919, 

Caah 1427.10 

Inventary of materials and supplies on hand 69,710.42 

Aeoounts receivable 4,731.81 

Construction work contracted 108.00 

Gross oonstmction cost |3«546, 157.26 

Less oonstmctian revenue earnings 55,176.96 

Net Mostmction cost 8,489,961.30 

Aooounts payable 39,785.90 

Contingent obligations 530.10 

CoUecttons and contracts oJt spedflc amounts (or repayments to reclamation (imd 124.00 

Cai^tal investment: 

Disbursement and transfer vouchers rec^ved $3,688,274.68 

CoUection and transfer vouchers issued 133,766.06 

Net investment 3,514,519.63 

138554—19 8 



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114 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPOKT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 
Feature costs of Grand Valley project to June SO, 1919. 



Principal feature. 



Examination and surveys, project . 
Pumping for irrigation, surveys 



Canal S3rs tern: 

Grand River diversion dam 

Canyon division, head works to Palisade 

Division No. 2, Palisade to Indian Waste 

Division No. 3, Indian Waste to Little Salt Wash . 
Division No. 4, Little Salt Wash to end 



Late^lsvstem: 

District No. 1, Indian Wash to Big Salt Wash , 

District No. 2, Big Salt Wash to East Salt Creek . . 
District No. 3, East Salt Creek to West Salt Creek. 



.Drainage system: 
Pr^ect— 

Surveys 

Drains 

Grand Valley drabiage district: Surveys and plans for complete system . 
Cooperative drainage in Grand Valley drainage district: 

Surveys and contract payments 

Drains 



Flood protection: Protecting wasteway channels , 
Farm units: Survey of irrigable land 

Permanent improvements: 

Permanent camp No. 5 

Permanent camp No. 7 

Ditch riders' quarters 

Miscellaneous Duildings 



Telei^one system 

Operation and maintenance during construction (water rental): 

Project 

Price— Stub 



Total cost of construoticm features 

Balance in plant and cliaring accounts on June 30, 1919. 



Gross construction cost to June 30, 1919. . 



Less revenues earned during constructicm period — 

Rentals of buildings 

Rentals of grazing and farming lands. « 

Rentals of power and light 

Rentals of irrigation water 

Rentals of telephone and tolls 

Contractors freight refunds 

Revenues .miscellaneous , 

Sales of Warren Act water 

Profit on hospital operations 

Losses on operations, un?lassified 



Net cost of construction of project to June 30, 1919.. 



Fiscal year 
1919. 



f758.73 
262.49 



30.06 



66,766.94 

3.55 

357.56 



57,158.11 



4,077.80 
5,758.47 
2,007.00 



11,843.27 



429.43 
2,334.66 



485.30 
120,241.87 



123,491.26 

1,146.25 
13,053.71 



1,046.17 

1,150.80 

287.77 

443.41 



2,928.24 



56,005.33 
974.74 



57,070.07 



267,712.13 



267,712.13 



730.41 

21.00 

259.92 

17,688.64 



265.35 

1258.67 

4,727.80 

440.59 

383.91 



24,258.95 



243,453.18 



Total to 
June 30, 1919. 



f71,462.38 
5,969.38 



500,466.03 
988,282.10 
530,905.72 
292, 35a 34 
344,535.58 



2,656,540.67 



135,854.13 
117,04a 10 
68,64a 80 



32L535.08 



7,546.99 
3,799.67 
25,383.58 

15,017.40 
145,89L92 



197,639.56 

13,627.16 
37,86L45 



5,233.80 
6,778.21 
3,826.39 
1,244.66 



17,083.16 



11,794.30 



144,629.11 
974.74 



145,603.85 



3,479,126.93 
66,03a 33 



3,545,157.26 



2,79L75 

1,484.74 

259.92 

43,495.96 

16.65 

8,067.08 

143.07 

4,727.80 

4,797.19 

U0,607.19 



55,176.96 



3,489.981.30 



1 Deduct. 



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COLORADO, GRAIH) VAULBY PROJECT. 
Cost statement by calendar years, Grand Valley project. 



115 





Canstmction. 


Operation 

and 

maintenance 

during 
construcuon. 


Total cost. 


Period prior to Dec. 31, 1911 


$82,366.98 

245,449.57 
432,928.81 
1,058,590.01 
838,600.39 
277,225.60 
119,338.33 
146,721.84 
132,295.55 




$82,366.98 


Year ending Dec. 31— 

1912 




245,449.57 


1913 




432,928.81 


1914 




1,058, .MM. 01 


1916 




838,600.39 


1916 


$19,458.25 
48,150.61 
47,525.32 
30,409.67 


290,083.85 


1917 


107,488.94 


1918 


194,247.10 


Janfift»7 1 to hm^ 3ft, 1919 


162,705.22 






Subtotal 


3,333,523.08 
66,030.33 


145,603.85 


3,479,120.98 




00,080.33 








Total 


3,S99,553.41 


145,603.85 


3,545,157.20 







Cost statement hy fiscal years j Grand Valley project. 





CoDStruotlon. 


Operation 
and 

during 
coDStnictioii. 


Total cost. 


Prior to June 30, 1912 


$206,401.04 

188,772.93 
008,889.51 
1,367,472,93 
324 814.92 
220,430.03 
91,033.00 
210,042.00 




$265,461.64 


Year en^ng June 30— 

1913T!?. 




188,772.93 


1914 




668,889.51 


1915 




1,357,472.93 


1910 


$4,050.40 
29,305.01 
54,578.37 
57,070.07 


329,465.32 


1917 


255,741.04 


1918 


145,611.43 


1919 


267,712.13 






Subtotal.. 


3,333,523.08 
00,030.33 


145,003.85 


3,479,120.03 


i>iATif KnA clearing accounts to June 30. 1919 . . , r . , ^ 


66,030.38 








Total 


3,399,653.41 


145,603.85 


3,545,157.26 







Eetirrujied cost of contemplated work, Grand Valley project, during fiscal year 1920, 



Features. 



Sub- 
feature. 



Principal 
feature. 



Bzamination and surveys. 
Lateral system: 

Surveys 

Excavation 

lOnor structures 



Drainage system: 

Project drains 

Grand Valley Drainage district.. 
State lands 



Flood protection 

Farm units 

Permanent improvements: Ditch riders' cottages. 

Operation and maintenance under water rental 

Reimbursable accounts 



Total. 



$300 

7,000 



5,000 
75,000 
20,000 



$500 



9,000 



100,000 
1,000 
1,000 
1,500 

60,000 
1,000 



174,000 



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COLOBADO, mrCOMPAHOBE PBOJECT. 

F. D. Ptlb, project manager, Montrose, Colo. 
LOCATION. 

Ck>untiee: Montrose and Delta. 

Townships: 15 S., Rs. 94 to 96 W., sixth principal meridian; 48 to 51 N., Rs. 7 to 
12 W.. New Mexico meridian. 

Railroad: Denver & Rio Grande. 

Railroad stations and estimated population June 30, 1919: Montrose, 3,600; Olathe, 
650; and Delta, 2,700. 

WATBB SUPPLY. 

Sources of water supply: Gunnison and Uncompahgre Rivers. 

Area of drainage basins: Gunnison River, 3,850 square miles; Uncompahgre River, 
500 square miles. 

Run-off in acre-feet, April to October^ inclusive, Gunnison River at River Portal 
(3,850 square miles), 1905 to 1918: Maximum, 1,737,300: minimum, 844,550; mean, 
1,337,270. Uncompahgre River at Colona, near Fort Crawfoid (500 square miles), 
1903 to 1918: Maximum, 256,700; minimum, 128,700; mean, 172,500. 

LANDS OPENED FOB ntBIGATION. 

Departmental order of March 26, 1919, opened to entry 8 farm units on April 25, 1919. 
Departmental order of April 9, 1919, opened to entry 3 farm units on May 2^ 1919. All 
lands irrigated from canals operated by the Reclamation Service were furnished water 
under rental contracts, except in a few instances where water was appurtenant to out- 
standing 9tock or deeds issued by canal compaiiies whose properties had been trans- 
fen ed to the Government. 

AGBIOXTLTUBAL AND CLIMATIC CONDITIONS. 

Area for which the service is prepared to supply water, season of 1919: Estimated 
at 100,000 acres. 

Area under rental contracts, season of 1919: Estimated at 80,000 acres. 

Area irrigated, season of 1918: 58,270 acres. 

Length of irrigating season: From April 1 to October 31, 214 days, on all Govern- 
ment canals except the Loutsenhizer, under which the season ends November 15. 

Average elevation of irrigable area: 5,500 feet above sea level. 

Rainfall on irrigable area: 19 years, average, 9.53 inches; 1918, at Montrose, 11 
inches. 

Range of temperature on irrigable area: -25° to 98® F. 

Chaiacter of soil of irrigable area: Red sandy gravel, adobe, and cla^ loam. 

Principal products: Amtlfa, grain, fruits, sugar beets, potatoes, omons, and vege- 
tables. 

Principal markets: Denver, Omaha, and Kansas City for live stock; Denver, Mis- 
souri River points, and Texas for fruit, potatoes, and onions; local mining camps for 
garden truck and small fruits. 

CHBONOLOGICAL STTIOCABY. 

Reconnoissance and preliminary surveys begun in June, 1901. 

Construction recommended by director March 7, 1903. 

Construction conditionally authorized by Secretary, March 14, 1903. 

Construction authorized by Secretary, June 7, 1904. 

Contract for construction of Gunnison Tunnel approved October 18, 1904. 

Fiist irrigation bv Reclamation Service, season ot 1908. 

Gunnison Tunnel completed for present use June, 1910. 

Gunnison River diversion dam completed January, 1912. 

Entire project 98.7 per cent completed June 30, 1919. 

116 



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COLORADO, UNOOMPAHGRE PROJECT. 117 

ntBIGATION PLAN. 

The irrigation plan for the Uncompahgre project provides for the diversion of water 
from the canyon of the Gunnison River by means of a tunnel 6 miles long and a canal 
11 miles long to supplement the flow of the Uncompahgre River, and in addition 
thereto the utilization of all waste, seepage, spring, percolating, and return water 
arising within the project, in the irrigation oi lands within the Uncompahgre Valley. 
To distribute the waters of the Uncompahgre and Gunnison Rivers thus combined, 
7 other canal systems were constructed, all of which take water from the Uncompahgre 
River, except the West Canal, which can divert water from the South Canal by a flume 
over the Uncompahgre River or can divert from ttie Uncompahgre River by a feeder 
canal. The construction of the various canal systems included me purchase, enlai^ge- 
ment, and extension of the more important private ditches acquired by the United 
States. 

Surveys and diamond-drill investigations for Taylw Park Reservoir have been 
completed, but no construction work nas been undertaken. The Gunnison Tunnel 
is complete. The South, West, Montrose & Delta, Loutsenhizer, Sedig, Ironstone, 
East, and Garnet canal systems are complete except for the excavation, enlargement, 
and extension of a few smEill laterals and the installation of minor structures. Inirchase 
has been made of over 85 per cent of the Loutsenhizer water rights and of shares 
pertaining to the Ironstone and Ironstone extension canals. 

SUIOCABY OF GENEBAL DATA FOB TTNGOMPAHaBB PBOJEOT TO 
END OF FISOAL YEAB. 

Areas: 

Irrigable acreage when project is completed 100, 000 

Public land entered to June 30, 1919 20, 080 

Public land open to entry on June 30, 1919 2, 705 

Public land withdrawn on June 30, 1919 1, 445 

Private land June 30, 1919 75, 770 

Acreage service could have supplied in season of 1918 100, 000 

Estimated acreage service can supply in season 1919 100, 000 

Estimated acreage service can supply in season 1920 100, 000 

Acreage irrigated season of 1918 58, 270 

Acreage cropped under irrigation season of 1918 57, 310 

Crops: 

Value of irrigated crops season of 1918 |3, 302, 460. 00 

Value of irrigated crops per acre cropped 57. 62 

Finances: 

Net construction cost to June 30, 1919 $6, 574, 514. 25 

Per cent completed on June 30, 1919 98. 7 

Appropriated for fiscal year 1920 $206, 000. 00 

Estimated per cent complete by June 30, 1920 99. 

Proposed appropriation for fiscal year 1921 $174, 000. 00 

Estimated per cent complete by June 30, 1921 99. 3 

Appropriation fiscal year 1919 $185, 000. 00 

Increased compensation 10, 938. 89 

Increased miscellaneous collections 174, 278. 02 

$370,216.91 

Expenditures chargeable to 1919 appropriation: 

Disbursements 163, 440. 04 

Transfers 12, 891. ft2 

Current liabilities 15, 253. 45 

Contingent liabilities 25. 00 

191, 610. 01 

Unencumbered balance on July 1, 1919 178, 606. 90 

Repayments — ^Water-rental charges: 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 $741,376.38 

CoUected to June 30, 1919 741,166.38 

Uncellected on June 30, 1919 210. 00 



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118 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 



Drainage: 

Estimated acreage damaged by seepage to Jime 30, 1919 16, 000 

Cost of drainage works to June 30, 1919 $3,940.63 

No drainage work imdertaken except for minor investigations. 

CONSTBUCTION DTJBINa FISCAL YSAB. 

Taylor Park Reservoir. — ^Hydrographic invastigations were con- 
tinued. 

Gunnison Tunnel, — ^Two gatehouses were constructed at River 
Portal — one over the Gunnison Tunnel headworks and the other ovier 
the sluice gates. Gasoline engine-driven lifting devices were installed 
for operating the Gunnison Tunnel gates and sluice-way gates. 

South Canal system, — ^Two concrete headgates, having 4 by 5 foot 
cast-iron gates, located on the South Canal to feed the Highline 
lateral, were completed; also a concrete headgate, having a 2 bv 2 
foot c'ast-iron gate, to deliver water to the A C lateral. One bridge, 
4 drops, 1 flume, 1 canal turnout, 6 farm turnouts, and 2 weirs, all 
timber structures, were completed. 

West Canal system. — ^Four farm turnouts and 2 weirs, all timber 
structures, were completed. 

Montrose cfe Delta Canal system, — ^A sluice gate was installed in 
the Montrose & Delta headworks, involving the placing of 4,400 feet 
board measure of lumber and 692 pounds of castings. Two bridges, 
1 check, 2 culverts, 1 drop, 1 flume, 1 canal turnout, 25 farm turn- 
outs, and 11 weirs, all timber structures, were completed. 

Loutsenhizer Canal system. — ^Two small flumes, 3 farm turnouts, 
and 2 weirs, all timber structures, were completed. The acquisition 
of outstanding water rights was continued. 

Selig Canal system,— k)ne bridge^ 11 checks, 3 drops, 1 flume, 22 
farm tiunouts, and 1 wasteway, all timber structures, were com- 
pleted. 

Ironstone Canal system. — ^The construction of the Ironstone exten- 
sion lateral was completed. The excavation was completed under 
the following field contracts: 



Schedule. 



Cabio 
yards. 



Contractor. 



Date of con- 
tract. 



Date of 
oompletion. 



1.2. 
4... 

5... 
6... 
7... 
8,9. 



8,576 
6,725 
6,878 
4,384 
5,213 
7,561 



John J. Halliday 

do 

R. E. Wear 

John J. Halliday 

E.T. Berry 

do..... 



Oct. 35,1018 

Apr. 29,1918 

liay 7,1918 

May 18,1918 

May 16,1918 

May 27,1918 



Mar. 22,1919 
June 1,1918 
Juno 21,1918 
June 12,1918 
July 22,1918 
Jan. 5,1919 



The principal structures installed on the Ironstone Extension lat- 
eral consistea of a timber flume 10 feet wide, 4 feet deep, and 84 feet 
long, containing 10,600 feet board measure of lumber, and 5 semi- 
circular No. 84 metal flumes, having a total length of 938 feet; 14,500 
feet board measure of lumber, and 71 cubic yards of rock masonry 
were used in the construction of the flumes. Ten bridges, 2 checks, 
7 culverts, 6 drops, 8 flumes, 36 farm turnouts, 2 wasteways, and 11 
weirs, all timber structures, were completed. The acquisition of 
outstanding shares of Ironstone and Ironstone Extension stock was 
continued. 



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COLORADO, TJNCOMPAHGRE PROJECT. 119 

East Canal system. — One bridge, 2 checks, 1 drop, 1 flume, 1 canal 
turnout, 11 farm turnouts, and 4 weirs, all timber structures, were 
completed. 

Garnet Canal system. — Six farm turnouts, all timber structures, 
were completed. 

Drainage system, — One observation of the fluctuation of the water 
level in me drainage test wells was made. 

SEBPAGE AND DBAINAGE. 

Considerable areas in the Uncompahgre Valley are suffering from 
an excess of ground water, largely caused by excessive and careless 
use of irrigation water. This condition is no doubt aggravated by 
Uie system in use of furnishing water on a continuous-flow basis. 
Seeped areas contain excessive quantities of alkali, and are not con- 
fined to the river bottoms or other low areas. About 7,500 acres 
have been drained in the valley. Some of this work was done by 
individual farmers, but all the larger undertakings were carried 
through by drainage contractors. 

Prcfiminary dramage surveys were begun during the spring of 
1915, but no drainage construction has been undertaken by the 
service. 

OPEBATION AND MAINTENANCE. 

During the season of 1918 the service supplied and distributed 
water for the irrigation of 58,270 acres of lana — 4,632 acres of which 
were supplied from the South Canal system, 4,794 acres from the 
West Canal system, 19,466 acres from the Montrose & Delta Canal 
system, 4,450 acres from the Loutsenhizer Canal system, 5,319 acres 
from the Selig Canal system, 12,613 acres from the Ironstone Canal 
system, 5,378 acres from the East Canal system, and 1,618 acres 
from the Garnet Canal svstem. The Logan and the North Mesa 
Canals, the owners of which have entered into an agreement to 
transfer them to the United States, were supplied with Gunnison 
water. Gunnison water was also rented to the Ouray Ditch Co; 

During the season 423,050 acre-feet of water were diverted into 
the cantus operated by the service, of which 367,144 acre-feet were 
delivered to the land. AH water was furnished on a continuous flow 
rental basis. The charge was $100 per second-foot for the season 
for all consumers under all canal systems, except as noted below: 
The consumers under the Loutsenhizer, Selig, and East Canal sys- 
tems possessing water rights in the old Loutsenhizer Canal were fur- 
nished at the rate of $20 per second-foot for Uncompahgre priority 
* water and $80 additional per second -foot for supplemental water. 
A few consumers under the Montrose & Delta Canal system were 
furnished Uncompahgre priority water at rates varying from $36 to 
$40 per second-foot, depending iipon the terms of the contracts they 
held with the Montrose & Delta Canal Co. at the time of its purchase 
by the Government. Water appurtenant to the stock of tne Iron- 
stone Canal system was carried for $5 per share; Ironstone Extension 
stock for $3 per share; Delta Chief stock for $2 per share; Home Run 
stock for $1 .50 per share, and Chipeta stock for 25 cents per share. 
Private canals were furnished Gunnison water at the South Canal 
outlet at the rate of $80 per second-foot for the season. Water was 
diverted into the Chipeta-Beaudry ditch from the Garnet Canal, 



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120 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

under informal contract, for $100 for the season. All water rentals 
were paid in advance. 

Except for the heavy maintenance work on the South Canal and 
the Montrose & Delta slides, the season was good for the operation 
and maintenance of the canal systems; there was no serious inter- 
ference with the delivery of water. However, the season was most 
expensive, on account of the amount of work done, as the high cost 
of materials and the high cost and scarcity of labor made it necessary 
to do a considerable portion of the work at a time when there was 
no competition with the farmers for labor. The routine maintenance 
work consisted of cutting brush from canal banks, spading laterals, 
removing weeds after wind storms, protecting the head gates during 
high water, removing gravel near tne head works of canals, raising 
banks, and replacing structures. 

Water was turned out of the South Canal on July 10 and 11, August 
14 and 15, September 9 to 11, and June 13 to 16, in order to make 
minor repairs to concrete lining. 

A flood in the Loutsenhizer Arroyo in July and another one in 
September made it necessary to reconstruct the flume where the 
Garnet Canal crosses the arroyo. On September 9 flood water 
entered the South Canal from a small gulch at the foot of the incline 
above tunnel No. 1 and caused the bulgmg of about 50 feet of sidewall. 
Temporary repairs were made so that the water service could be 
contmued. Permanent repairs were completed in December. 

During November and December the floor of the Montrose & 
Delta weir was covered with concrete, repair work was commenced 
on the South Canal concrete lining, the overflow weir at the Garnet 
dam was concreted, and gravel was cleaned from the Montrose 
& Delta, Loutsenhizer, Selig, Ironstone, and East Canal headworks. 
The West Canal and the King lateral extension were thoroughly 
cleaned in places where the canals were gradually filling up witn 
gravel through gravel cuts. Practically all of the metal flumes were 
cleaned, repaired, and tarred. A portion of the metal flumes at each 
end of the High Mesa siphon was replaced with wood. During 
February about 50 feet of sidewall lining on the South Canal near 
mile post 4 bulged on account of water from melting snow finding its 
way Dehind the concrete. This work was repaired in April. Im- 
\ provements were installed at the Montrose & Delta and Selig head- 
works in order to better control the gravel. Steel rails were driven 
above the South Canal outlet to control the Uncompahgre River and 
prevent it imdermining the outlet structure. 

Historical review , Uncompahgre project. 



Item. 



Acreage for which service was prepared to 

supply water 

Acreage irrigated 

Miles of canal operated 

Water diverted, acre-feet 

Water delivered to land, acre-feet 

Per acre of land irrigated, acre-feet 



1914 



52,338 
33.873 
279.5 
183,342 
171,268 
5.06 



1915 



1916 



62,147 , 

'11,463 

355.8 

264,000 

231,271 

5.56 



77,713 

49,273 

406.45 

329,5(>4 

299,432 

6.08 



1917 



90,000 

53,108 

415 

368,148 

316,365 

5.96 



1918 



100,000 

58,270 

413 

423,050 

367, 144 

6.30 



19191 



100,000 

61,000 

435 

430,000 

366,000 

6.00 



1 Estimated. 



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COLORADO, UNCOMPAHGRE PROJECT. 



121 



SETTLEMENT. 

Departmental order of March 26, 1919, opened to entry 8 farm 
units on April 25, 1919, by a drawing at the local land office. Six 
of these farm units had been previously farmed under leases during 
the seasons of 1917 and 1918. There were 30 contestants for three 
entries and two entries have been made since that date. Depart- 
mental order of April 9, 1919, opened to entry 3 farm units on May 2, 
1919. As there was only one applicant for each unit, there was no 
<lrawing at the land office. Fau* progress has been made by entry- 
men in developing the lands above mentioned and lands opened to 
enl^ by departmental order of February 21, 1918. 

The agreement between the United States and the water users' 
association, executed on May 7, 1918, provides for the operation and 
maintenance of the project at cost to the water users, and also that 
the first payment of the construction charge will become due Decem- 
ber 1, 1922. 

Mr. H. A. Lindgren, project agricultural advisor, continued his 
successful work in connection with the promotion of feeding and 
milking tests and in the importation of nigh grade and registered 
stock. He was also instrumental in the organization of a bull 
association on the project. There is no experimental farm on the 
project but considerable interest is manifested in the experimental 
work of tile Colorado Agricultural College. Specialists nave been 
sent out by the Department of Agriculture, the Colorado State Agri- 
cultural College, and the agricultural department of the Denver & 
Rio Grande Railroad Co. in wie interests of better farming. Domestic 
science, com, potato, pig, and other clubs have been organized in the 
district schools. Cooperative shipping associations have been formed 
among the farmers, and a live stock protective health association, 
which employs a competent veterinarian to attend to the health of 
the live stock of the 200 members of the association. Both Montrose 
and Delta counties had the services of competent county agents, 
who have helped materially in promoting the agricultural and live- 
stock industnes. 

Settlement datOf Uncompahgre project. 



Item. 



1914 


1915 


1916 


1917 


910 


1,107 


1,320 


1,402 


2,942 


3,561 


4,403 


4,613 


910 


1,107 


1,320 


1,402 


551 


615 


713 


809 


359 


492 


607 


593 


2,942 


3,561 


4,403 


4,613 


3 


3 


3 


3 


6,500 


6,500 


6,700 


6,950 


9,442 


10,061 


11,103 


11,563 


22 


24 


26 


26 


26 


26 


27 


27 


8 


8 


8 


8 


1360,000 


$360,000 


$360,000 


$515,700 


$1,692,612 


$1,556,963 


$2,750,000 


$4,858,903 


5,950 


5,975 


8,100 


9,500 



1918 



ToUl number of Harms on project 

Population 

Number of irrigated Harms 

Operated by owners w managers . . 

Operated by tenants 

Population 

Number of towns 

Population 

Total population in towns and farms. 

Number of public schools 

Number of churches 

Number of banks 

Total capital stock 

Amount of deposits 

Number of depositors 



1,514 

5,279 

1,514 

949 

565 

6,279 

3 

6,950 

12,229 

26 

27 

8 

$588,800 

$4,484,626 

10,000 



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122 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL EEPOBT OF BEOLAMATION SEBYIOB. 



CHOPS. 

The season of 1918 was excellent for alfalfa, beans, sugar beets, 
oats, onions, and wheat. It was fair for apples and potatoes. In 

{general the prices received for all crops were good. There was a 
arge increase in the acreage of wheat due to the national demand for 
more wheat and the guaranteed price. The prices received for 

Eroducts averaged about the same as in 1917, or about 100 per cent 
igher than in previous years. Labor was scarce and high priced. 
Tms condition did not seriously affect the production of crops. A 
heavy freeze on June 1 and 2, 1919, practically ruined the fruit crop 
on the south half of the project and did some aamage to the fruit on 
the north half of the project. Considerable damage was also done 
to potatoes, alfalfa, and early vegetables. 

Crop report, Uncompahgre project, Colorado^ year of 1918. 



• 


Area Unit of 
(acres).i yield. 


Yields. 






Values. 






Crop. 


Total. 


Average 
per acre. 


Per unit 
of yield. 


Total. 


Per acre. 


Alfalfa hay 


1 

21,860 Ton 

115 Bushel.... 

2,162 1 Pound.... 

348 1 Bushel.... 

1,299 ...do 

1,083 1 Ton 

53 ' .-do 

25 ' Biwhel... 


72,026 

352 

10,573,488 

10.997 

19,211 

11,143 

80 

70 

55,923 

1.179 

4,060 

112,180 


3.3 

3.1 

4,891 

31.6 

14.8 

10.3 

1.5 

2.8 

30.8 

6.2 

7.3 

2,003 


111.07 

12.44 

.018 

1.64 

4.21 

10.04 

10.70 

15. 19 

1.55 

2.79 

9.67 

.08 


1797,409 

4^380 

191,740 

18,077 

80,797 

111,832 

856 

1,083 

86,976 

3,289 

39.27Q 

8,808 

11,997 

6,230 

194,844 

49,046 

27,171 

1,936 

1,142 

60 

50 

959,222 

413 

667.552 

38,203 




$36.48^ 


Alfalfa seed 


^09 


AddIcs 


88.09' 


Barley.' 

Beans 

Beets, sugar 


51.95 
62.2a 
103.26 


Clover hay 


16.15 


Clover seed 


43.62 


Coni| Indian 


1,817 

228 

565 

56 

127 


...do 

Ton 

...do 

Pound.... 


47.87 


Corn fodder 


14.43 


Corn ensilage 


70.77 


PYults, small ... 


158.89 


Oarden 


94.4ft 


Hay 


306 


Ton 


537 
191,994 
89,254 


1.8 
35.2 
2936 


n.60 

1.01 
.55 


20.36 


oafe..:. ...:::...: 


5.461 Bushel.... 
304 .-.do 


36.68 


Onions 


161.33 


Pasture 


2,264 




12.00 


Peaches 


59 
9 
1 


Pound 

...do 

Bushel.... 


35,560 

27,360 

20 

1,500 

1,170,174 

266 

342,562 


603 
3,040 
20 
1,500 
179.6 
11.1 
26.0 


.054 

.042 

3.00 

.033 

.82 

1.65 

1.95 


33.80 


Pears 


126.80 


Peas 


60.00 


Prunes 


1 Pound 

6,514 Bushel.... 

24 ...do 

13,176 -do 


60.00 


Potatoes, white 


147.26 


Rye 


17.31 


Wheat 


60.66 


Miscellaneous 


148 




268.13 


Less duplicated areas 


685 


Total and average 








Total cropped acre- 
age 


57,310 


3,302,460 




67.62 













183 
3,631 
2,828 
5,682 


Areas. 


Acres. 


Num- 
ber of 
farms. 


Per 
cent of 
project. 


Irrigated, no crop: 

Nonbearing orchard . . 

Young alfalfa 

Ground fall plowed. . . 
Less duplicated areas. 


Total irrigable area of fa 

Total irrigated area of f« 

Under rental contra 

Total cropped area of fa 


krms report 
inns report 
cts 


«d 

Ad 


76,222 
68.270 
68,270 
67,310 


1,514 
1.614 
1,614 
1,614 


76 
68 
68 


rms reports 


Bd 


67 


Total Irrigated acre- 
age 


58.270 

















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COLORADO, UNOOMPAHGRE PROJECT. 123 

PTJBLIG NOTICES AND OBDEBS. 
ORDER, MARCH 25, 1919. 

1. Order of February 21, 1918, amended. — Notice is hereby given 
that the jorder of February 21, 1918, opening lands on the uncom- 
pahgre Valley project, Colorado, is modified in respect to the applica- 
tion of the initial payment of $3 per acre required to be paid in 
pursuance of said order, as a minimum charge for water of $1 per 
irrigable acre for each of the years 1918, 1919, and 1920, so as to 

Srovide that when lands have been, or hereafter are, entered after 
une 15 of any year, and therefore do not secure the benefits of water 
for irrigation purposes in that year, the payment of the $3 j>er acre 
made at the time of entry will be applied as a credit to the minimum 
water-rental charges, or the minimum operation and maintenance 
charges, for the three-year period beginning with the year following 
that in which entry was made, in accordance with the minimum 
charges which have been, or hereafter may be, established by the 
Secretary of the Interior for similar lands on the project. For lands 
which have been, or hereafter are, entered on or before June 15 of any 
year the said payment of $3 per acre will be applied as a credit to the 
minimum water-rental charges, or the minimum operation and 
maintenance charges, beginning with the year in which the entry is 
made. 

S. G. Hopkins, 
Assistant Secretary of the Interior. 

ORDER, MARCH 26, 1919. 

1. Pnblic lands for which entry may be made and water is available. — 
In pursuance of the reclamation act of Jime 17, 1902 (32 
Stat., 388), and acts amendatory thereof or supplementary thereto, 
particularly sections 1,10, and 11 of the reclamation extension act of 
August 13, 1914 (38 Stat., 686), it is annoimced that water is available 
and entry may be made in accordance with this order on the foUowing- 
described farm units on the Uncompahgre Valley project, Colorado, 
to wit: 



nnit. 


Description. 


Acres 
irrigable. 


C 
E 
C 

c 

N 
A 
H 


8W.iNE.isec.4,T.49N.,R. 10W.,N.M. P. M 

E. i NE. i NE. i SE. i sec. 20, T. 50 N., R. 9 W., N. M. P. M 

N.|8W.l.sec.M,T.50N.,R.9W.,N.M. P.M 

E.iSWJt,NW.JSW.Jsec.32:NE.iSE.i8ec.31,T.50N.,R.9W.,N.M.P.M.... 

8E.iNW.*,N.JSW.Jsec.9,T.50N.,R. 11 W.,N.M. P.M 

SW.iNE. sec.25,T.50N.,ft.llW.,N. M. P.M 

Lots 3 and' , NE. i 8W. i soc. 31, T. 15 8., R. 94 W., sixth P. M 


30 
29 

3d 
85 
62 
8 
78 


E 


SW.iSE. Jsec. 20, T. 15 8., R. 95 W.,sixth P. M 


33 









Diagrams showing the above-described farm units were approved 
by the department on the date of this order, and are on file in the 
omce of tne project manager. United States Reclamation Service, 
Montrose, Colo., and at the local land office, Montrose, Colo. 

2. When and how to make ettry for pnblic land. — Homestead 
entries for the farm imits shown on said plats mav be made begin- 
ning April 25, 1919, at 9 o^clock a. m., at the saicf local land office. 



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124 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

Every person desiring to acquire any of said public lands must exe- 
cute a homestead application subject to the provisions of the reclama- 
tion law in manner required by law, which, with the required fees 
and commissions, accompanied by certificate of the project manager 
as to the filing of application for rental of water and payment of 
water-rental charges as hereinafter provided, may be presented to 
said local land office, in person, by mail, or otherwise, within a period 
of six days prior to the opening, to wit: On and from April 19, 1919, 
to and including 9 o'clock a. m. April 25, 1919. AppEcations pre- 
sented after said period of six days will be filed ana noted in the 
order of their receipt. Any applications not based on a prior settle- 
ment right will be subject to valid settlement claims asserted in the 
manner required by law. 

3. Simultaneous filings for public lands. — Applications reaching 
said local land office durii^ said period of six days will be held and 
treated as simultaneously med, and the register and receiver will dis- 
pose of them as follows: 

(a) Where there is no conffict, the application will be allowed. 

(b) Where there are confficting homestead applications, the regis- 
ter and receiver will write on cards the names of the several appli- 
cants, and each of these cards will be placed in an envelope upon 
which there is no distinctive or identifying mark, and at 2 o'clock 

E. m., on the date of opening to entry, if practicable (if not, at the same 
our one day later), after all the envelopes containing the names of 
the several applicants shall have been thoroughly mixed in the pres- 
ence of such persons as may desire to be present, they will be drawn 
and numbered in order. The cards as drawn and numbered will 
be secm*ely fastened to the applications of the respective persons, and 
the applications will be allowed in such order. Applications con- 
flicting in whole with those previously allowed will be rejected in the 
usual manner. 

4. Failure of applicant to obtain public land applied for. — Where 
any applicant fails to obtain laiid applied for by him, he will be per- 
mittea to elect whether he will amend his application to embrace 
other lands not affected by pending applications and otherwise sub- 
ject thereto when such amended application is presented, or with- 
draw his original application without prejudice. In the event of 
such withdrawal the fees and commissions will be returned by the 
receiver, and the water-rental charges deposited will be returned by 
the project manager, upon surrender of the certificate of filing issued 
by tne project manager. 

5. Warning against unlawful settlement upon public land. — No 
person will be permitted to gain or exercise any right whatever xmder 
any settlement or occupation of any of said public lands, b^im at 
or prior to 9 a. m. April 25, 1919; provided, however, that this shall 
not affect any valid existing right obtained by settlement or entry 
while the land was subject thereto. 

6. Limit of area for which entry may be made. — The limit of area 
per entry representing the acreage which, in the opinion of the Sec- 
retary 01 the Interior, may be reasonably required for the support 
of a family upon such lands, is fixed as shown upon the plats for the 
several farm units. 

7. Application for water rental. — All water-rental applications 
must be made to the project manager. United States Reclamation 



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COLOBADOy UNCOMPAHGBE PROJECT. 125 

Service, Montrose, Colo. Applications may be made on or after the 
date hereof upon forms provided for that purpose and must be ac- 
panied by a payment of $3 per acre for each irrigable acre contained 
m the farm unit. Each water-rental application must be for a speci- 
fied farm unit, and more than one person mav make such applica- 
tion for the same farm unit. A certificate of filing will be issued 
each applicantby the project manaj^er. Filing of water-rental applica- 
tion ana issuance of ceertificate give no preference right to entry on 
{)ubUc lands. Only when the project manager is notified by the local 
and office that an entry has been allowed wiD acceptance of the water- 
rental application be indorsed thereon. Whereupon all other water- 
rental applications affectine the farm unit in question with payments 
made will be returned to tne respective applicants, upon surrender 
by them of the certificate of filing issued by the project manager. 

8. Water-rental charge. — The initial payment of $3 per irrigable 
acre will be credited as payment of a minimum charge of $1 per acre 
for each of three successive years b^inning with the year in which 
entry is made, payment of which amoimt wiU entitle the entryman 
to $1 worth of water each of said years, at the rates fixed in the 
regulations of the Secretary of the interior for similar lands on the 
project; provided that when lands have been, or hereafter are entered 
after Jxme 15 of any year, and therefore do not secure the benefits of 
water for irrigation purposes in that year, the payment of the $3, 
made at the tune of entry, will be applied as a credit to the minimum 
water-rental charges, or the minimum operation and maintenance 
charges for the tm*ee-year period beginning with the year following 
that m which entry is made, in accordance with the minimum charges 
which have been or hereafter may be established by the Secretwy 
of the Interior for similar lands on the project. Additional water 
will be furnished at the same rate as established for water deliveries 
to other lands in the project. The charges herein provided will be 
made against each acre of irrigable land in the farm xmit whether 
water is used thereon or not, and no part of the initial payment of 
$3 per irrigable acre will be refunded at the termination of the three- 
year period. Future chaiges will be announced by further order or 
by public notice. Said mmimum water-rental charge of $3 per irri- 
gable acre will be required to be deposited in advance by tne pros- 
pective entryman upon executing water-rental application before 
making apphcation lor entry in accordance with the terms of this 
order. 

9. Water users' association. — The successful applicant after mak- 
ing homestead application will be required to subscribe the land em- 
braced in his farm unit to the Uncompahgre Valley Water Users' 
Association. 

10. Water-right application nnder public notice. — Within three 
months after date of public notice, hereafter to be issued for the lands 
described in said f arm-imit plats, each entryman must make a formal 
water-right application covering his farm xmit, in accordance with 
tiie terms of such notice and tne last proviso of section 1 of said 
reclamation extension act. Upon failure so to do, the Secretary of 
the Interior may, at his option, cancel the entry in question with all 
rights acquired thereunder. 

S. G. Hopkins, 
Assistant Secretary of the IrUerior. 



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126 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

ORDER, APRIL 9, 1919. 

1 . Public lands for which entry may be made and water is available. — 
In pursuance of the reclamation act of June 17, 1902 (32 Stat., 388), 
ana acts amendatory thereof or supplementary thereto, particularly 
sections 1, 10 and 11 of the reclamation extension act of August 
13, 1914 (38 Stat., 686), it is announced that water is available, as 
hereinafter specified, and entry may be made in accordance with the 
terms and conditions imposed by this notice on the following described 
farm xmits: 



Farm 
unit. 


Description. 


Acres 
irrigable. 


N 

P 

Q 


W.*NW.i,SE.iNW.*.W.*W.4 8W.lNE.l,E.JNE.SW.i,E.jW.JNE. 

i sV. J 8CC. 29, 1^ 15 S^R. 96 v., sixth p: M. 
W.JSE.J,E.i8W.JNE.J,E.4W.J8W.JNE.isec29,T.16 8.,R.96W.,sIxth 

P.M. 
E.|8E.i8ec.29;8W.iSW. Jsec.as, T. 16 8., R.96W.,8ixthP.M 


50 
49 
48 









A diagram showing the above described farm units, which is 
amendatory of a township plat approved February 20, 1918, was 
approved by the department on the date of this order, and is on file 
in the office of the project manager. United States Reclamation 
Service, Montrose, Colo., and at the local land office, Montrose, Colo. 

2. Special conditions of opening and allowance of entry. — The 
opening of the farm units and the allowance of entry thereon under 
this notice is upon the express condition that the entryman shall 
take the water available for the farm unit entered by him at a point 
known as station 244+55 on the Buttermilk lateral, located in the 
NE. J NW. } sec. 33, T. 15 S., R. 96 W., sixth principal meridian, 
approximately 470 feet west and 125 feet south oi the north quarter 
comer of said, section 33, and at his own sole cost and expense con- 
struct, operate and maintain a siphon and other irrigation works 
necessary for carrying the water from said point of delivery to his 
entry. A further condition of the allowance of entry is tnat the 
applicant shall within one year from the date of his entry construct 
the siphon and other irrigation works necessarv for carrying the water 
from said point of delivery to his entry ana upon failure so to do 
within saia year, the Secretary of the Interior may at his option 
cancel his entry with all rights acquired thereimder. Nothing 
herein is to be construed, however, as preventing an entryman from 
joining with other entrymen for the purpose of jointly constructing 
the necessary irrigation works for carrying the water from said 
point at which it is delivered by the United States to the lands of 
the entrymen. 

3. When and how to make entry for pnblic land. — ^Homestead 
entries for the farm units shown on said plats may be made beginning 
May 2, 1919, at 9 o'clock a. m., at the said local land office. Every 

Eerson desiring to acquire any of said public lands must execute a 
omestead application subject to the provisions of the reclamation 
law in manner required by law, which, with the required fees and 
commissions, accompanied by certificate of the project manager as 
to the filing of application for rental of water and payment of water- 
rental charges as hereinafter provided, may be presented to said 



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COLOBADO, UNCOMPAHGRE PROJECT. 127 

local land office, in person, by mail, or otherwise, within a period of 
six days prior to the opening, to wit: On and from April 26, 1919, to 
and including 9 o'clock a. m., May 2, 1919. Applications presented 
after said period of six days will be filed and noted in the order of 
their receipt. Any applications not based on a prior settlement 
right will be subject to valid settlement claims asserted in the manner 
required by law. 

4. Simultaneous filings for pnblic lands. — ^Applications reaching 
said local land office during said period of six days will be held and 
treated as simultaneously filed, and the register and receiver will 
dispose of them as follows: 

(a) Where there is no conflict the application will be allowed. 

(b) Where there are conflicting homestead applications the register 
and receiver will write on cards the names of the several applicants, 
and each of these cards will be placed in an envelope upon which 
there is no distinctive or identifying mark, and at 2 o'clock p. m., on 
the date of opening to entry, if practicable (if not, at the same hoiu' 
one day later), after aU the envelopes containing the names of the 
several applicants shall have been thoroughly mixed, in the presence . 
of such persons as may desire to be present, they will be drawn and 
numbered in order. The cards as drawn and numbered will be 
securely fastened to the appUcations of the respective persons, and 
the applications will be allowed in such order. Apphcations con- 
flicting in whole with those previously allowed wiU be rejected in the 
usual manner. 

5. Failure of applicant to obtain public land applied for. — Where 
any appHcant fails to obtain land appUed for by mm he will be per- 
mitted to withdraw his oiiginal application without prejudice. In 
the event of such withdrawal the fees and commissions will be re- 
turned by the receiver, and the water-rental charges deposited will 
be returned by the project manager, upon surrender of the certificates 
of filing issued by the project manager. 

6. Warning against nnlawfnl settlement npon pnblic land. — No 
person will be permitted to gain or exercise any right whatever under 
anj settlement or occupation of any d said pubhc lands, begim at or 
prior to 9 a m. May 2, 1919: Provided, Tiowevery That this shall not 
affect any valid existing right obtained by settlement or entry while 
the land was subject thereto. 

7. Limit of area for which entry may be made. — ^The limit of area 
per entry representing the acreage which, in the opinion of the 
Secretary of tne Interior, may be reasonably required for the support 
of a family upon such lands, is fixed as shown upon the plats for the 
several farm imits. 

8. Application for water rental. — All water-rental applications 
must be made to the project manager, United States Reclamation 
Service, Montrose, Colo. AppUcations may be made on or after the 
date hereof upon forms provided for that purpose and must be accom- 
panied by a payment of $3 per acre for each irrigable acre contained 
m the farm unit. Each water-rental appUcation must be for a 
specified farm imit, and more than one person may make such appli- 
cation for the same farm unit. A certificate of ming will be issued 
each applicant by the project manager. Filing of water-rental 
application and issuance of certificate give no preference right to 
entry on public lands. Only when the project manager is notified 



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128 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

by the local land office that an entry has been allowed will acceptance 
of the water-rental application be indorsed thereon. Whereupon all 
other water-rental applications affecting the farm unit in question 
with payments made, will be returned to the respective applicants, 
upon suriender by them of the certificates of filing issued by the 
project manager. 

9. Water-rental charge. — ^The initial payment of S3 per irr^able 
acre will be credited as payment of a minimum charge of $1 per acre 
for each of three successive years beginning with the year in which 
entry is made, payment of which amoimt will entitle the entryman 
to one dollar's worth of water each of said years, at the rates fijced in 
the regulations of the Secretary of the Interior for similar lands on 
the project: Provided , That wnen lands have been or hereafter are 
entered after Jime 15 of any year, and therefore do not secure the 
benefits of water for irrigation purposes in that year, the payment of 
the $3, made at the time of entry, will be apphed as a credit to the 
minimum water-rental charges, or the minimum o|)eration and main- 
tenance charges for the three-year period beginning with the year 
following that in which entry was made, in accordance with the 
minimum charges which have been or hereafter may be established 
by the Secretary of the Interior for similar lands on the project. 
Additional water will be furnished at the same rate as established 
for water deliveries to other lands in the project. The charges 
herein provided will be made against each acre of irrigable land in tne 
farm imit whether water is used thereon or not ana no part of the 
initial payment of S3 per irrigable acre will be refunded at the termi- 
nation of the three-year period. Future charges will be annoimced 
by further order or by pubUc notice. Said minimum water-rental 
cnarge of S3 per irrigable acre will be required to be deposited in 
advance by the prospective entryman upon executing water-rental 
application before making application for entry in accordance with 
the terms of this order. 

10. Water users' association. — The successful applicant after 
making homestead application will be required to subscribe the land 
embraced in his farm unit to the Uncompahgre Valley Water Users' 
Association. 

11. Water-right application under pnblic notice.— Within three 
months after date of public notice hereafter to be issued, for the 
lands described in said farm unit plat, each entryman must make a 
formal water-right application covering his farm unit in accordance 
with the terms of this order and such notice and the last proviso of 
section 1 of said reclamation extension act. Upon failure so to do, 
the Secretary of the Interior may at his option cancel the entry in 
question with all rights acquired thereunder. 

John W. Hallowell, 

Assistant to the Secretary of the Interior, 



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COLORADO, UNCOMPAHGRB HlOJECT. 129 

FINAKdlAI^ 8TATBKBNT. 

Condensed balance sheets Uncompahgre project, June SO, 1919. 

Cash $4,259.98 

Inventory of miterial and soppUes on band 33,500.72 

Aoooonts receivable 210.00 

Construction work contracted (value of outstanding ditch systems) 68, 562. 68 

Construction work: 

aross construction cost $6,35-7,305.81 

Gross operatkm and maintenance during construction..,,., 972,495.31 

Plantaooounts 11,850.52 

. $7,341,651.64 

Less construction revenue earnings , 767,137.39' 

Net oonstraotion cost ,..,,. ...... — - — — -. 6,574, 614. 26 

Accounts payable , 48,«6.90 

C(mtin«;ent obligations 72v8!82.66 

Capital investment: 

Disbursement and transfer voudiers received... — — — 7,500,573.50 

Lessc3ilection and transfer vouchers Issued — . ..• . 941, 186. 43 ;. 



Net Investment........ , 6,559,388.07 

Feature costs of Uncompahgre project, Jun£ S0iyi91^:- 



Examination and surveys.. 

Storage investigations (Taylor Park Dam) . 

Tlmal system: 

Gunnison River weir and headworks. . . 

Gunnison Tumiel 

South Canal 



Lateral system: 

South 

West 

Montrose^ Delta 

Loutsenhiser. 

Sdig 

Ironstone 

East 

Garnet 

Preliminary estimates sublaterals . 



D rainage Investigations 

Power system — preliminary work. . 
Farm units 



Permanent improvements: 
Lands ana buildings . . . 
Roads 



Telephone sirstem 

Operation and maintenance during construetion (water rental basis) . 

Subtotal 

Plant accounts 



Gross construction C3st. . 



Less revenues earned during construction period: 

Rentals of buildings 

Rentals of i^rasing and firming lands 

Rentals of Irrigation water 

Contractor's freight refunds 

Other revenues, unclassified 

Profits on hospital operations 



Net construction cost to June 30, 1919 . 



1 Deduct; transferred to Gimnison Tunnel costs. 
138554—19 



FIsoilyAir 
1919. 



Total to^Jtane 
.30,1^19. 



$96,541.76 
12,698.93 



$5,398.67 

35,174.05 

662.73 



41,235.45 



5,455.27 

264.98 

4,405.66 

279-78 

. 2,063.14 

24,715.82 

1.281.66 

172.27 

152,28 



121,233.37 

3,064,829.68 

871,308.20 



4,077,371.26 



38,780.86 



10S.89 
235.93" 



2,786.89 
1 37, 735. 00 



134,949.11 



133,451.92 



178,863.94 



178,863.94 



675.63 

25.00 

155,510.97 

7.81 



M,806.45 



164,412.96 



24,450.98 



s Deduct. 



60,OB8.8S 
271,611.11 
561,633.99 
137,793.25 
351,312.95 
445,651.32 
264,926.64 
6,664.30 
152.28 



2,098,724.52 



3,940.63 

273.86 

36,003.20 



24,873.30 



34,873.30 



6,788.48 
973,496.31 



7,329,801.12 
11,860.62 



7,341,66L64 



30,167.21 

32.00 

741,376.38 

2,679.47 

24.00 

2.868.33 



767,137.39 



6,674,514.25 



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180 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL BEPOBT OF RECLAMATION SERVIOE. 
Cost statement by calendar yearSf Uncompahffre project. 



1904 (Includes 1902 to 1904). . 
Year ending Dec. 31— 

1905 

1906 

1907 

1908 

1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 

1913 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

Jan. 1 to June 30, 1910 



Subtot<iL 

Plant aooounts on June 30, 1919. . 



Total. 



, Operation 

' and m^in- 

Coostraction. tensnce 

durineoon- 

stmction. 



166,088.02 

623,904.17 , 
1,199,870.82 I 
904.910.39 
541,230.15 
504,384.60 
414,994.51 
274,704.21 
279,060.25 
267,755.55 
295,499.72 
301,819.68 
283,855.19 
160,204.77 
134,4A8.09 
14,546w79 



6,857,305.81 



6,357,305.81 



$7,723.63 
21,3.31.50 
45,621.97 
47,156.30 
71,197.61 
104,523 62 
71,089.73 
89, .WO 33 
89,997.26 
165,083.88 
195,293.84 
63,906.64 



Total cost. 



972,495.31 
11,850.52 



964,345.83 



$66,068.02 

623,904.17 
i, 190,879.82 
904,9ia39 
548,953.78 
615,n6.0O 
460,616.48 
321,860.51 
350.257.88 
372.279.17 
366,589.45 
391,389.01 
373,852.45 
325,288.65 
329,761.03 
78,453.43 



7,320, >^L 12 
11,85a 52 



7,341,65L«4 



Cost Statement by fiscal years, Uncompahgre project. 



1905 riachides 1902 to 1905). 
Year ending June 30— 

1906 

1907 

1908 

1909 

19W 

1911 

1912 

1913 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

1919 



Subtotal. 



Plant aocounts to June 30, 1919. 
Total 



Coostraction. 



Operation 
and main- 
tenanoe 
dnrinecon- 
structioa, 



$131,304.68 

1,130,248.77 
1.11S883.07 
610,901.02 
664,653 48 
567.272.09 
253,221.37 
307,552.80 
197,088.86 
29S,12S.54 
383, 917. .'i6 
310,332.20 
190,996.08 
147,393.37 
45,412.02 



$1, 74a 71 

17,504.38 

21,148.27 

59,804.71 

62,056.19 

83,92a 94 

87,665.42 

72,82a 40 

98,886.07 

113.099.66 

220,39^64 

133,451.02 



Total cost. 



$131,304.58 

1,130,248.77 
1,118,883.07 
612,641.73 
682, 157. S6 
588, 42a 38 
313.026.08 
360,608.09 
281.000.80 
385,793.08 
456,737.06 
400.218.27 
304,095.74 
367,70a01 
178,863.94 



6,357,305.81 972,495.31 I 7,329.801.12 



11,850.52 I 



ll,8Sa52 



6,357,305.81 984,345.83 | 7,341,651.64 



Estimated cost of contemplated toork, Uncompahgre project, during fiMxU year 1920, 



Principal features. 



Lateral njstnn: Kxcaration and minor structures. 

r>ralnage svstem: Surveys 

Farm units. " 



Estimated 
cost dur- 
ing fiscal 
year 1920. 



Pomanent improvements 

Oporitton and maintenance, water rentals.. 
Reimbursable accounts 



Total. 



$13,000 

400 

100 

1.000 

135,000 
500 



150,000 



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IDAHO, BOISE PEOJECT. 

J. B. Bond, project manager, Boise, Idaho. 
LOCATION. 

GountieB*. Ada, Boise, Canyon, Elmore, and Malheur. 

Townships: 1 S. to 5 N., Rs. 6 W. to 6 £., Boise meridian, and Tps. 21 and 22 S., 
R. 46 E., Willamette meridian. 

Railroads: Oregon Short Line; Boise, Nampa A Owyhee and Idaho Northern ^now 
branches of Oregon Short line) ; Boise Valley Traction; Oddwell Traction; and Inter- 
mountain. 

Railroad stations and estimated population June 30, 1919: Boise, 26,500; NampiL 
5,750; GaldweU, 5,500; Meridian, 1,000; Kuna, 400; Wilder, 600; Bowmont, 50; and 
Melba, 200. 

WATBB SUPPLY. 

Source of water supply: Boise River. 
Area of drainage basin: 2,610 square miles. 

Annual run-off in acre-feet of Boise Rivor near Highland (2,610 square miles), 
1895 to 1918: Maximum, 3,829,800; minimum, 1,119,530; mean, 2,550,650, 

AGBICTJLTTJBAL AND CLDCATIC CONDITIONS. 

Area for which the service is prepared to supply water, season of 1919: 274,021 
acres, includii:^ 130,440 acres of vested water-rignt lands. 

Area under water-right applications and rental oonlzacts season of 1919: 142,758 
acres. 

Area under special contracts: 130,440 acres. 

Length of irrigation season: April 5 to October 5, 181 days. 

Average elevation of irrigable area: 2,500 feet above sea level. 

Rainfall on irrigable area: At Boise station for 50 years, average 13.81 inches; 
1918, 12.73 inches. 

Range of temperature on irrigable area: 28^ to 111^ F. 

Character of soil of irrigable area: Clayey loam, light sandy loam, and sandy loam. 

Principal products: Aludfa, wheat, oats, clover, potatoes, api^ee, prunes, and small 
fruits. 

Principal markets: Boise, Nampa, Caldwell, and Meridian, Idaho; P(«tland> Oreg.; 
and eastern cities. 

LANDS OPENED FOB IBBIQATION. 

Dates of public notices: July 2, 1917; April 1, 1918; March 7, 1919; March 8, 1919. 
Limit of area of farm imits: Public, 80 acres; private, 160 acres. 

OHBONOLOGIGAL SXTMMABY. 

ReconnoiBsance made and preliminary surveys beeun in 1902. 
Construction recommended by board of engineers February 15, 1905. 
Construction authorized bv Secretary Mai^ 27, 1905. 

Main canals of New York Canal Co. and Idaho-lowa Lateral & Reservoir Co. 
acquired March 3, 1906. 

First irrigation by Reclamation Service, season of 1906. 

Boise River Dam completed September, 1908. 

Upper Deer Flat embankment completed March, 1911. 

Deer Flat forest embankment completed June, 1911. 

Lower Deer Flat embankment completed January, 1912. 

Boise River power plant completed May, 1912. 

ArrowTOck Imm completed November, 1915. 

Pioneer district drainage completed June, 1916. 

Nampa and Meridian district drainage completed August, 1917. 

Project 99 per cent completed June 30, 1919 (not including extensions). 

131 



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132 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

IBBIGATION PLAN. 

The irrigation plan of the Boise project provides for storage of water in the Arrow- 
rock Reservoir on Boise River, about 22 miles above Boise, and in the Deer Flat 
Reservoir near Caldwell and Nampa, Idaho; the diversion of water from Boise River 
by the Boise River Dam, about 8 miles above Boise; the distribution of water on the 
south side of Boise River, through the Main Canal, leading from the dam to the 
Deer Flat Reservoir; distributinglaterals heading in the Main Canal; distributing 
canals heading in the Deer Flat Reservoir; and distributing canal systems heading 
in the Boise Kiver below the Boise River Dam ; and the dismbution of water on the 
north side of the Boise River to a small area of land east of Boise through a canal 
system heading in the Boise River Dam. The United States claims all waste, seepage, 
spring, and percolating water arising within the project, and proposes to use such 
water in connection therewith. 

SUKMABY OF GBNBBAL DATA FOB BOISB PBOJBCT TO END OF 

FISCAL YEAB 1919. 

Areaa: 

Irri^ble acreage when completed, including possible extensions. 327, 552 

Public land entered to end of fiscal year 67, 452 

Public land withdrawn at end of fiscal year 3, 160 

State land unsold June 30, 1918 1, 859 

Private land 255, 791 

Acreage service could have supplied season of 1918 274, 339 

Estimated acreage service can supply July 1, 1920 274, 021 

Acreage irrigated, season of 1918 exclusive of vested right lands. . 110, 000 

Acreage irrigated, 1918, covered by crop census 95, 074 

Acreage cropped, season of 1918, covered by crop census 90, 720 

Crops: 

Value of irrigated crops, season of 1018, covered by crop census . . $5, 154, 646. 00 
Value of irrigated crops, per acre cropped, covered by crop census . 56. 80 

Finances: 

Net construction cost to end of fiscal year. $11,973,276. 17 

Per cent complete at end of fiscal year (except extensions) 99. 

Appropriation for fiscal year 1920, total $664, 000. 00 

Allotment for construction, fiscal year 1920 $214, 000. 00 

Estimated per cent complete, June 30, 1920 (except extensions) . . 100. 

Proposed appropriation, fiscal year 1921 $774, 000. 00 

Estimated per cent complete, June 30, 1921 (except extensions). . 100. 

Announced construction chaiges per acre $70 and $80 

Appropriation, fiscal year 1919 (direct) $732, 000. 00 

Miscellaneous collections and transfers 62, 004. 03 . 

Increased compensation 24, 089. 24 

818, 093. 27 
Expenditures during fiscal year, chargeable to 1919 appropriation: 

Disbursements $464, 553. 28 

Transfers 40, 041. 14 

Registered liabilities chargeable to 1919 appro- 
priation 4 2 , 2 63 . 54 

Contract obligations wholly covered by 1919 ap- 
propriation 11, 822. 08 

558, 680. 04 

Unencumbered balance, July J , 1919 259, 413. 23 



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IDAHO, BOISE PROJECT. _ 135 

Repaymente: 

Value of construction water-right contracts $11, -760,427. 46^ 

Construction charges: 

Accrued to end of fiscal year 502, 848. 63 

Collected at end of fiscal year 455, 730. 51 

Uncollected at end of fiscal year 47, 118. 12 

Operation and maintenance charges: 

Accrued to end of fiscal year 208, 827. 54 

Collected to end of fiscal year 171,669.28 

Uncollected at end of fiscal year 37, 158. 26 

Wat^r rental charges: 

Accrued to end of fiscal year 677, 654. 83 

Collected to end of fiscal year 671, 427. 10 

Uncollected at end of fiscal year 6, 227. 73 

Power earnings: 

Accrued to end of fiscal year 82, 794. 66 

Collected to end of fiscal year 82,794.56 

Drainage: 

Estimated acreage damaged by seepage at end of fiscal year 6, 660 

Miles of drains built to end of fiscal year — 

Open 149. 6 

Ctoeed .4 

Total 149.9 

Estimated acreage protected by drains buUt to end of fiscal year. . . 88, 000 

Estimated acreage to be protected by authorized system 93, 500 

Cost of drainage works to end of fiscal year $776, 754. 44 

CONSTBUCTION DXTBING FISCAL YEAB. 

Distribution unit. — Considerable construction work was completed 
in connection with this feature during the fiscal year 1919. Seven 
hundred and ten structures were installed which required the placing 
of 1,835 cubic yards of concrete, 574 cubic yards of masonry, and 
133,700 feet of lumber. The lining work on the Main South Side 
Canal was of the most importance and comprised the placing of 1,600 
cubic yards of concrete. No work of consequence is now in progress. 

Notus Canal unit. — Construction of this unit commenced m March 
and at the present date 44 structures have been completed. One of 
the most important structures constructed was a 5i-foot diameter 
siphon, 272 feet in length. The pipe was built in place. Materials 
placed in the construction of the completed structure amounted to 
280 cubic yards of concrete and 110,000 feet of limiber. The earth- 
work on the portion of tlie Notus Canal above the Boise River was 
contracted for, and on June 30, 1919, was practically complete. The 
yardage moved amounted to 140,881 yards of class 1, 16,649 yards of 
class 2, and 8,606 yards of class 3* Work in progress consists of 
clearing of right oi way for the construction of the Boise River 
siphon and several other miscellaneous structures. 

Riverside drainage.— Tins feature was commenced during the early 
part of the fiscal year 1919. Satisfactory progress has been made ana 
mdudes the complete installation of 241 structures and the excava- 
tion pf approximately 700,000 cubic yards of material. In the con- 



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184 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

struction of the structures 280 cubic yards of concrete and 250,000 
feet of lumber were placed. Bucyrus electric draglines were used 
on the excavation of all drains. Work in progress is along the same 
lines as reported above. 

BOISB POWEB PLANT. 

As the hydroelectric plant at Boise diversion dam had served its 

|)rincipal purpose for tne construction of Arrowrock Dam, it was 
eased to the Idaho Power Co. for a period of five years, beginning 
Julv 1, 1916, for an annual rental of $11,000. All costs of operation 
and, maintenance are borne by the lessee, and reservation of electric 
power is held at cost of production for use in drainage and other work 
on the project. 

SBBPAGB AND DBAINAGE. 

The approximate area of seeped land is given in the accompanying 
table, based on a water plane from zero to 6 feet bdow the groima 
surface. These areas are not wholly unproductive, but the tendency 
is for conditions to gradually grow worse. There is one area in the 
Nampa and Meridian irrigation district which is quite bad and grow- 
ing worse each year. 



Name of area. 



Pioneer irrigation district 

Nampa and Meridian irrigation district. 

Fan^o Basin 

Arena Ba^dn 

TenMUe 

Oreenleaf 



Wverside and Big Bend irrigation district. 
ICisoellaneous ,... 



Acreage 
reclaimed. 


Esti- 
mated 
acreage 

stilT 
seeped. 



10,200 

5,850 

700 



2,500 



Total - .• ' 10,250 



300 
350 
000 
500 
500 
350 
150 
3,000 
700 



6,650 



Pursuant to the contract with the Riverside irrigation district, 
construction of the drainage system in that district has been under 
process for the past fiscal year. Two hundred and forty-opie miscel- 
laneous structures have been installed, involving the use of 249,779 
b. m. feet of lumber and 72 barrels of cement. Excavation amounted 
to 700,211 cubic yards, by two Bucyrus electric dredges. 

OPEBATION AND MAINTBNANCE. 

During 1918 water was delivered on the basis set forth in paragrajA 
10 of the public notice issued July 2, 1917, i. e., at the rate of 75 
cents for tne first acre-foot, 20 cents per acre-foot for additional water 
during the flood season ending June 30, and 40 cents per acre-foot 
during the storage season beginning July 1. The revenues from this 
source^ amounted to approximately $230,000 and resulted in a 
deliverv of 492,816 acre-feet of water to 2,207 farms, containing an 
irrigable area of 117,024 acres. The average amount of water used 



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IDAHO. BOISE PBOJEOT* 



136 



was 3.75 acre-feet, at an average cost of $2.67 per acre for operation 
and maintenance. On April 1, 1918, public notice No. 2 was issued. 
This notice anno\mced the beginning ox construction charge on 507.59 
acres of {)rivate land contiguous to the Nampa and Mendian irriga- 
tion district. 

The reservoirs of the Idaho-Iowa Lateral & Reservoir Co. were 
partly filled, under contract, through the Government canal system. 

Under permanent contracts water was released from Arrowrock 
Heservoir to supplement the vested rights of the following irrigation 
districts: Nampa and Meridian, Pioneer, Farmer^s Cooperative Ditch 
Co., Settler's Canal Co., the Farmer's Union Ditch Co., and the New 
York Canal Co. 

The rights of the United States to divert water from the natural 
flow- of the Boise River terminated for the season of 1918 on July 13, 
after which it was necessary to draw from Arrowrock Reservoir to 
maintain the necessary discharge in the Main Canal. 

The full storage capacity of Arrowrock Reservoir was available for 
the season; the maximum storage was reached on June 14, 1918. On 
October 4 the water had all been drawn out except 21,252 acre-feet. 
The maximum storage for Deer Flat Reservoir was 162,585 acre-feet, 
which was reached on April 18, 1918. On October 12 there remained 
23,146 acre-feet in this reservoir. 

The total diversion for the project during 1918 was 824,458 acre- 
feet, or 6.27 acre-feet per acre, which included canal and reservoir 
losses. The total waste from the project was 5.17 per cent of the 
total diverted at the head of the Mam Canal. The loss from the Deer 
Flat Reservoir was 16 per cent, as compared with 12.6 p6r cent for 
1917. 

Maintenance, — The fall of 1918 was even more favorable than that 
of 1917 for maintenance work, as freezing weather did not interfere 
with construction repairs until the latter part of December. ^ The 
eanal and lateral systems of the project were put in ^ood condition. 
The winter of 1918 and 1919 was exceptionally mild, restdting in 
little damajge to canals and structures. The spring of 1919 was 
exceptionally dry and most of the canals and laterals were nm at 
capacitv shortly after the opening of the irrigation season, or April 5. 
Notwithstanding this very few breaks occurred, and these few were 
on the lower end of the project. 

ExUarvxH review^ Boise project, Idaho, 



Item. 



1014 



1015 



1916 



1017 



1018 



1010 



AcreaflB to which aervioe was prepared to 
faniui water 

Aoreaga irrigated 

Miles of canals operated 

Water diverted (acre-feet) 

Water delivered to land per acre of land 
iirigaled (acre-feet) 



2(y7,000 

83,fi00 

971 

406,M5 

2.62 



207,000 

97,127 

073 

542,102 

2.81 



1223,806 

s 101,315 

960 

666,854 

3.56 



1223,806 

'95,524 

982 

618,272 

3.07 



1274,839 

110,000 

968 

824,462 

3.75 



1274,021 

980 

(•) 

(•) 



1 Indndhig partial service to vested water-right lands, 
s Acreage served with full water supply. 
» Not yet determined. 



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186 EIGHTEENTH ANJf UAL RfflPQp^ OF IPCJ^AMATION SERVICE. 

SBTTLBMENT. 

Throughout the past fiscal year there has been a great influx of 
people into the Boise Vallev. All hotels in the various towns on the 

Sroject have been crowded to capacity. Farm lands have been in 
emand at prices ranging from $100 to $350 per acre.. Hundreds of 
farms have changed hands several times. This movement of farm 
property has been accompanied by an era of building both in th^ 
surrounding towns and on the farms. The excellent prices received 
from the sale of farm products assure the continuation of the present 
good times and the future settlement of the Boise project. 

Settlement data, Boise project. 



Item. 



Total nmnber of famu on project 

Populatioii 

Number of Mrii^ted farms 

Operated by owners or manners 

Operated by tenants 

Population 

Number of towns 

Population , 

Total population In towns and on farms. . 

Number of public schools 

Number of churches 

Number of banks 

. Total of qapital stock 

Amount oidepiMits ^.. 

Number of depositors 

Total number of relinquishments 



1015 



2,600 

8, GOO 

1,906 

1,358 

550 

6,143 

10 

30,500 

30,100 

22 

52 

13 

545. MO 

42V, 300 

123,777 



1016 



3,926 

12,5C0 

2,450 

1,600 

860 

7,520 

10 

34,3^ 

46,910 

22 

52 

15 

SI, 750, 000 

19,000,000 

124,850 

18 



1917 


1918 


3,932 


3,992 


12,5S0 


18,200 


2,780 


3,0G0 


1,900 


2,090 


880 


970 


8,340 


9,170 


10 


10 


34,750 


36,000 


47,330 


49,200 


22 


24 


52 


52 


16 


16 


11,800,000 


$1,800,000 


$11,500,000 


$11,600,000 


125,000 


^25,000 


32 










1919 



3,992 
15,000 
3,207 

669 
10,000 

le 

40,000 
55O0O 

24 
54 

15 

$2,000,000 

$13,500,000 

128,000 

3 



> Estimated: some banks refuse to give number of depositors. 
PBINCIPAL CBOPS. 

The principal crops grown on the project during 1918, according 
to value, were as follows: Alfalfa, wheat, potatoes, clover hay, and 
clover seed. Alfidfa covered the largest area, amounting to 37,507 
acres, showing an increase over the previous year of 3,420 acres. 
The fruit crop on the project was small owing to the late frost. 
Market conditions were excellent, but some losses occurred on 
account of shipping facilities. The average crop retiim was increased 
from $49.77 in 1917 to $56.80 m 1918. AB these figures are restricted 
to the areas covered bv the usual crop census of the Reclamation^ 
Service and do not include lands in the New York Canal tract nor 
in the Nampa and Meridian and Pioneer irrigation districts, to which 
the Government furnished water to supplement particd vested rights. 



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IDAHO, BOISE PROJECT. 
Crop report, Boise project, Idaho, year of 1918. 



137 



Crop. 



Area 

(acres). 



Alftdfehay 

AUallSaseed 

Ahikehay 

AMkeseed 

Apples 

Baney 

Beans 

Beets 

Cane 

CloTerbay 

Clover seed , 

Com, Indian , 

Com, sorKhum 

Com, ensilage , 

Com, fodder ". 

Com, pop 

Fruits, small , 

Garden ; 

Hay, misoeDaneous 

MiUetseed 

Oats 

Onions , 

Pasture , 

Peaches , 

Pears , 

Prunes , 

Potatoes, white 

Potatoes, sweet , 

Rye 

Wheat 

Less duplicated areas. . . 

Total cropped acreage 



Irrlnted, no crop: 

Nonbearins orchard . 

Young allalEa 

Young ctover 

Miscellaneous 

Ground fall plowed . . 
Less duplicated areas 

Total irrigated area 



37,607 

429 

26 

233 

1,670 

2,358 

812 

2 

6 

6,709 

4,669 

2,491 

17 

146 

477 

96 

109 

572 

209 

35 

2,110 

21 

6,345 

149 

12 

302 

1,843 

22 

127 

30,071 

6,654 

90,720 



Yields. 



Unit Of 
yield. 



Ton 

Bushel. 

Ton 

Bushel. 
Found . , 
Bushel. 
..do.... 

Ton 

...do.... 
...do.... 
Bushel. 
...do.... 
...do.... 

Ton 

..do.... 
Bushel., 
Pound . , 

Ton 

Bushel. . 
..do.... 
..do.... 

round., 
..do...., 
..do.... 
Bushel., 
..do.... 
..do.... 
...do.... 



Total. 



Average 
per acre. 



163,460 

1,600 

40 

463 

1,413,404 

57,496 

20,595 

20 

16 

10,807 I 

17,652 ' 

W,482 ! 

317 

1,345 

2,906 

4,180 

137,050 

874* 

472 

56,567 
2,228 

" 127,' 768' 

3,042 

92,296 

331,663 

304 

904 

722,450 



4.4 
3.7 
1.52 

■'966"*' 
24.4 
25.4 
10 
2.9 
1.9 
3.9 
39 
17 
9 
6 
43 
1,257 

■"i.'s" 

13 
27 
106 

■'857 *■ 

262 

3a5 

180 

14 

7 

24 



Per unit I 
of yield. ; 



$14.00 t 
12.79 I 

laoo i 

17.67 I 

.03 

1.52 

3.23 I 

10.00 

12.75 

12.11 i 

17. 13 I 

2.28 I 

1.65 I 

9.82 

6.11 ; 

1.81 
.06 

"n.'ih'l 

4.84 
1.03 
1.26 

' '.04 
.10 
.05 
1.10 I 
3.58 
1.87 
1.861 



Total and average. 



Values. 



Total. 



12,287,857 

20,337 

400 

8,180 

40,947 

87,489 

66,529 

200 

204 

130,821 

302,507 

224,245 

524 

13,214 

17,763 

7,585 

7,853 

44,350 

4,282 

2,286 

53,136 

2,824 

103,503 

5,587 

312 

4,565 

363,298 

1,087 

1,691 

l,346j070 



6,154,646 



Per acre. 



161.00 
47.41 
15.38 
85.11 
26.08 
37.10 
81.93 

100.00 
37.09 
22.91 
66.21 
90.02 
30.82 
90.51 
37.24 
79.01 
72.06 
77.53 
20.49 
66.31 
27.55 

184.48 
19.36 
37.60 
27.13 
15.12 

197,12 
49.41 
13.32 
44.76 



56.80 



Areas. 



.507 

7,014 

584 

616 

2,281 

6,648 



96,074 



Total irrigable area farms reported . 
Total irrigated area farms reported . 

Under water-right applications. 

Under rental contracts 

Total cropped area Items reported.. 



Acres. 



, Per 
Farms, cent of 
'project. 



115,480 
95,074 
80,774 
5,300 
90,720 



2,207 i 
2,207 I 



2,207 



80.3 
66wl 
62.4 
3.7 
63.0 



PUBLIC NOTICES AND OBDEBS. 
PUBLIC NOnOE, MARCH 7, 1919. 

1. In pursuance of section 4 of the reclamation act of June 17, 
1902 (32 Stat., 388), and of acts amendatory thereof or supplementary 
thereto, particularly the reclamation ^ctension act of August 13, 
1914 (38 Stat., 686), pubUc notice for the Boise project, Idaho- 
Qr^pn, is hereoy issued as follows: 

2. Lands for wUcli water will be furnished.— Upon proper water- 
ri^ht application bein^ made therefor, water will be furnisned imder 
said project in the irrigation season of 1919 and thereafter for the 
irrigable lands of said project, shown on the farm-unit plats of the 
fpUowing tbwnsh^, to wit: 



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138 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

BOISE MBRIOIAN. 

T. 4 N., R. 5 W.: Sec. 4, E. i 8W. J; see. 5, NE. i; sec. 9, NE. J NW. }. 
T. 5 N., R. 5 W.: Sec. 29, W. i; sec. 30, S. i NE. J and N. * SE. J; sec, 32, 
E. i NW. J. 

WILLAMETTB MERIDIAN. 

T. 21 8., R. 46 E. 
T. 21 S., R. 47 E. 
T. 22 S., R. 46 E. 

Said plats were approved by the Secretary of the Interior on January 
26, 1917, and are on file at the local land office at Boise, Idaho, 
and at the office of the project manager, United States Reclamation 
Service, Boise, Idaho. 

3. Public notice of July 2, 1917, applicable. — All of the terms and 
conditions of the public notice for the Boise project, dated July 2, 
1917, so far as the same may be applicable, shall apply to the lands 
covered by this public notice and shown on the farm-imit plats 
above described. 

4. Operation and maintenance charge. — ^The operation and mainte- 
nance charge for the irrigation season of 1919 and thereafter tmtil 
further notice shall be the same as that for other lands of the Boise 
project under public notice. 

5. Limitation as to reduced construction charge. — ^The time within 
which a reduced construction charge may be secured under para- 

fraph 9 and subdivision (c) of paragraph 11 of said public notice, 
ated July 2, 1917, is not extended as to any land beyona July 2, 1918. 

S. G. Hopkins, 
Assistant Secretary of the Interior, 

PUBUO NOnOB, MARCH 8, 1919. 

1. Annual operation and maintenance charges. — ^In pursuance of 
section 4 of the reclamation act of Jime 17, 1902 (32 Stat., 388), 
and of acts amendatory thereof or supplementary thereto, particu- 
larly the reclamation extension act of August 13, 1914 (38 Stat.. 
686), annoimcement is hereby made that the annual operation ana 
maintenance charge for the irrigation season of 1919, and thereafter 
until further notice, against all lands of the Boise project, Idaho- 
Oregon, under public notice, shall be a minimum charge of $1.25 per 
irritable acre, whether water is used thereon or not, which will 
entitle the water user to 2 acre-feet of water, measured on the land; 
further water will be furnished at the rate of 30 cents per acre-foot 
during the flood season ending June 30 and 60 cents ^er acre-foot 
during the storage season beginning July 1: Provided^ That the 
owners of New York water-right lan£ who are tmder contract with 
the United States for storage water shall pay 65 cents per irrigable 
acre, whether water is usea thereon or not, which will entitle tiio 
user to 1 acre-foot of water per irrigable acre after July 1, and addi^ 
tional water will be delivered at the rate of 60 cents per acre-foot: 
Provided further y That in case stock and domestic water is delivwed 
6utside of the irrigation season a charge of $2 per acre-foot will be 
tnade for the same, with a minimum charge of $2 to each applicant 
for such service. All operation and maintenance charges will be 
due and payable on March 1, following the irrigation season; but 



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IDAHO, BOISE PEOJEOT. 



139 



where water-right application is made for land in private owner- 
ship after August 1 no operation and maintenance charge will be 
made for wa& deUverea during the remainder of the irrigation 
season in which the water-right application is made. 

S. G, Hopkins, 
Assistant Secretary of the iTderior. 

FINANOIAL STATBHXNT. 



Condensed balance iheei^ Boise project, Jwu€0, 1919. 

Cash ;.. 

Jnventory of materials and supplies on hand 

Accounts receivable: 

Cumot accounts duo $91, 012. 77 

Constructkio WBteMTight char^ unaccrued 11,282,610.83 

Construction work contracted 

Gross construction cost , S12,75g,215.87 

Less construction revenue earnings 784,039.70 



$17,005.42 
65,743.0$ 



11,373,623.60 
11,822.08 



Net construction cost 

Qtqbb operation and maintenance cost 

Less operation and ma^tenanoe revenue earnings. 



428.282.46 
39,507.71 



11,973,276.17 

388.684.75 

57,361.0$ 

28,827.50 

12,011,334.5$ 



s payable 

Cootinsenl obligatians 

CoUeetions and contracts o( specific amounts for repayments to reclamation fund 

Capital Investment: 

Disbuiaement, transfer, and Joint construction vouchors received $13, 847, 942. 19 

CoUection, transfer, refund, and joint construction vouchers issued 2, 095, 310. 26 

Net Investment 11,752,631.93 

Feature costs of Boise project to June SO, 1919, 



Feature. 



Fiscal year 
1919. 



K»aminfttion and surveys: 

Distribution unit 

Storage unit 



Storage systemr 

Deer Flat Reservofr— 

Ix>cation and surveys 

Eight of way , 

Upper embankment 

Lower embankment 

Forest embankment 

Equalizing chanaels 

Clearing site, etc 

Arrowrock Reservoir- 
Preliminary and general work.. 

Right of way 

Water righto 

Arrowrock Dam 

Log con veyor 

Crane 

Power preparatory 

Spillway 

Bridge over spillway 



$66.69 



86.69 



Canal system: 

Main South Side Canal.. . 
Notus Canal (north side). 



13,358.40 



480.40 



12,878.00 



28,000.30 
121,523.44 



149,532.74 



Lateral system: 

From Main Canal 

From Deer Flat Reservoir.. 
Penitentiary lateral 



20,176.18 
503.40 



20,769.58 



To June 30, 
1919. 



$124,245.68 
8, < 2a 61 



132,966.24 



4,881.13 

234,5.3.74 

313,802.07 

354,645.82 

6,206.0$ 

5,729.32 

7,686.16 

177,172.37 
70,570.86 
20.04L78 
3,611,048.51 
54.215.66 
9.344.98 
19,451.36 
531,L36.51 
3,749.04 



5,454,345.37 



2,063,839.31 
121,523.44 



2,185,362.75 



1,441,794.45 

1,174,206.99 

24,355.93 



2,640,357.37 



t IMnct; Credit to "Arrowrock Dam," due to transfer of value of camfp buildings to *' Permanent lm» 
provtmenta." 



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140 EIGHTEENTH ANl^tJAL BM^^RT OF RECJLABiATION SERVICE. 
Feature eosti of boite project to Jfufu id, IPiP— Continued. 



Feature. 



Drainage system: 

i^ioneer diatnct 

Nampa-Meridi m district 

Cooperative district 

Fargo Basin :.*.: 

From Deer Flat 

Riverside district. f •. 

Misoellaneous— 

OibboBS drain... ^... 

West End drvUn.. 

General investigations and surve3rs.. 



FIs'^ year f To Jane 30, 
< 1919. I 1919. 



31,672.22 

31,599.30 

163,344.44 



89,236.59 



Power system: Boise River power plant: 

Original cost 

Less items transferred to cost of Arrowrook Dam. 



89,163.67 



Farm units 

Permanent improvements: 
Distribution unit- 
Project ofiKe building and grounds.. 
Watermister's headquarters— 

Lower embankment 

wader 

Upper embankment 

Kuna 

Rock spur 

Camp Three 

Ditchriders' headquarters— 

Golden Gate drop 



298,397.63 
309,345.94 



37,771.4S 
31,796. 9S 
91,82L44 

1,036.31 
2,342.54 
4,242.tt 



776,754.44 



254,795.25 
59,489.9» 



195,305.27 



Fareodrop... 
Robinson Hill pipe line . 
Eight Kile. 



Barber wasteway. . . . 

Drop into Deer Flat Reservoir . 



Gatetender's house- 
Indian Creek drop 

Indian Creek diversion works 

Development Government (arms 

Roads 

Ififloellaneous smallimprovements 

Storage unit— 

Chttetender's house, Arrowrock Dam 

Camp buildings at Arrowrock (permanent).. 
Camp buildings at diversion dam (permanent) . . 
Roads 



i.'mwl 



3,400.00 
1,880.00 



Telephone system: 
Distribution unit. 
Storage unit 



6,660.93 



46,953.5(> 



21,749.07 

4,217.64 
3,993.32 
2,531.91 
3,875.4» 
947.18 
3,495.11 

796.83 
2, in. 95 
222.84 
375.32 
178.01 
326.39 

383.29 
308.83 

6,235.24 
272.41 

3,383.13 

4,004.01 

3,683.85 

1,882.36 

76,486.72 



141.026.10 



34,377.50 
9,67S.20 



Operation and maintenance during construction (water-rental basis) ! i 1.079, 20S. 13 



Total cost of construction leatures 263,335.61 12,696.331.87 



Unadjusted clearinE accounts. 
Balance in plant accounts 



* 1,201. 42 
63,085.42 



Gross construction cost 1 2ft3,33'>.6l j 12,758,215.87 

Less revenues earned during construction period — 

Rentals of buildings 

Rental of gracing and farming lands 

Nei power earnings (prior to public notice) 

Rentals of irrigation water 

Contractors' freig it refunds 

Ot her revenues, unclassified 

Loss on hospitaJ operations 

Other profits on operation^, unclassified 



1 

2,' 847.63' I 



30.68 ' 
'i42.*58' 



27,267.31 
U,83a5» 
50.515.11 

667; 006. 18 
13,0H2.58 
17,141.05 

M, 067, 23 
164.29 



3,020.89 I 784,939.70 



Net construction cost I 260,314.72 11,973.276.17 



..1 Deduct: Credit to "Cooperative district" due to egua) dhialon of cost of district between the Fioneft 
district and the Nampa-Mendlan dmrict. t -i 

» Deduct . V- ». 



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IDAHO) BOISE PBO JECT. 
Co^t Btatement by calendar yeart, Boue project. 



141 





Operation and maintenance. 






Constniction. 


Dtirlnft con- 
struction. 


Under pub- 
lic notice. 


Total. 


Total cost. 


Tear ending Dec. 81- 

1902... 4 


12,274.51 








$2,274.51 


1908...! 


2,965.58 

20,800.47 

19,354.12 

602,924.72 

2,025,053.46 

1,487^290.75 

1,126,916.73 

1821,817.19 

769,368.08 

447,236.14 

1157,512.76 

67^179.85 

197,032.80 








2,965.58 
20,809.47 


1904...* 








1905 








19,354.12 
602,924.72 
740,507.53 


1906...* '.... 






. ' 


1907.- ^ ^... 


4; 973: 78 

4U388.89 

64,406.52 

51,841.70 

84,226.36 

137,330.56 

131,607.44 

170,723.38 

135,231.51 

248,022.21 




19,455.80 
4,973.78 
41,388.89 
64,406.52 
51,841.70 
84,226.86 
137,33a 56 
181,607.44 
170,728.86 
185,231.51 
248,022.21 
294,216.48 
139,723.61 


1908 i.. 


- - 


828,961.08 

877,898.65 

857, 68a 88 

2.076,805.16 

1,571,517.11 

1,264,247.29 

1,952,924.63 

940,091.44 

582,467.65 

90,509.45 

361,396.38 

836,756.41 


1909 ^.. ^„ 




1910 


: 


1011 




1912 ; 




1918 




1914 




1915 




1916. 




1917 


i294,'2i^'48' 
139,723.61 


1918... 


January to June 30, 1919 








t>lant aoomints, Jtuie 80, 1919 


11,617,123.74 
63,085.42 
11,201.42 


1,079,208.13 


433, 94a 09 


1,513,148.22 


18,180,271.96 
63,085.42 
16,850.05 






1.5,657.63 


16,657.68 








Total 


11,679,007.74 


1,079,208.13 


428,282.40 


1,507,490.59 


13,186,408.38 





1 Deduct. 
CoH Hatement by fiscal years, Boiee project. 



Year ending June 30— 



Operation and maintenance. 



Period 1902 to 1906, inclusive. 

1907 

1908 

1909..^ 

1910 

1911 

1912 

1913 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

1919 



Plant accounts June 30, 1919. . . 
Unadjusted clearing accounts. . 



Total 11,679,007.74 



Construc- 
tion. 



$177,614.16 

825,797.94 

861,209.53 

775,939.73 

673,232.59 

1,226,238.26 

2,100,108.94 

1,161,361.85 

1,560,385.86 

1,521,283.87 

395,631.08 

219,848.90 

1153,862.58 

263,335.61 



11,617,123.74 
63,065.42 
11,201.42 



$4,606.26 
9,529.25 

29,898.01 

46,499.71 

49.059.84 

65,027.15 
117,700.90 
144,422.58 
147,643.91 
133,520.11 
173,a3a26 
158,261.15 ,$130,333.66 
303,606.43 



Total. 



iL 



1,079,208.13 I 433, 94a 09 



15,667.63 



,079,206.13 I 428,282.46 



$4,606.26 

9,529.25 

29,898.01 

46,499.71 

49,0)9.84 

65,027.15 

117,709.90 

144,422.58 

147,643.91 

133,520.11 

173,03a 26 

288,594.81 

303,606.43 



1,513,148.22 
"'V5,*657*63" 



1,507,49a 59 



Total cost. 



$177,614.16 

830,404.20 

870,738.78 

805,837.74 

719,732.30 

1,275,296.10 

2,174,136.09 

1,279,071.75 

1,704,808.44 

1,668,927.78 

529,151.19 

392,879.16 

134,732.23 

566,942.04 



13,130,285.42 
63,085.42 
16,859.05 



13,186,498.38 



1 Deduct. 
EsHmaUd cast of contemplated work, Boise project, dunng fiscal year 1920. 



Principal features. 



Estimated 
cost dur- 
ing fiscal 
3reer 1920. 



Canal system, North Side subunit 

Drainage system. Riverside District 

Operation and maintenance, water rental . . 
Operation and maintenance, public notice . 
Reimbursable accounts 

Totol 



$76,00 
100,000 

14.000 

234,000 

4,000 



428.000 



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142 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 
Operating cost and revenues ^ Boise project, to Dec. SI, 1918. 



C08T. 

Stornfre works: 

ArrowTDCk Resenroir. . 
Deer Flat Reservoir. . . 



Calendar year 1918. 



Operation. 



Canal s]rstem: 

Headworks 

ICaln Canal- 
First section... 
Second section. 



Lateral systnnr 

From ICain Canal- 
First section 

Second <iectlon 

From Upper Deer flat 

embanlrment 

From Lower Deer flat 

embankment 

Penitentiary lateral 



Drainage system. 



Undistributed expenses: 

Hydrometry 

BuUdings 

Roads 

Camp maintenance 

Telephone expense 

General expense 

Engineering and inspection 
Superintendence and ac- 
counts 

MlsceiUmeous 



Subtotal (operation and 
maintenance cost) 

BEVSNUE8.' 

Rentals of buildings during 
operation period 

Rentals or irrigation water 

Operation and maintenance 
charges accrued 

Other revenues, unclassified, 
earned during operating pe- 
riod 



SI6,S40.83 
6.331.71 



21,««1.54 



810.57 

0,03a 26 
1,929.68 



Halnte- 
naoce. 



1889.97 
125 



11,779.51 



8,346.64 
40,374.80 

2,434.51 

21,213.92 
773.08 



891.22 



1,654.01 

21.677.03 
2,237.57 



25, .568. 61 



41,882.17 
65,843.14 

4,366.12 

41,256.29 
1,752.81 



73.142.45 

^1 



155,l0a53 
5,129.88 



604.15 



97.42 
1336.83 



477.63 
11K0.26 



662.11 



702.75 
115.84 

« 132. 97 
10S.43 

» 689. 73 
16.60 

817.20 
» 277.49 



760.63 



107.265.61 



Difference, deficit. 



I 



I86,9i0.87 



Total. 



$16,789.80 
6,382.96 



22.072.76 



2,473.58 

30,707.29 
4,167.25 



37,348.12 



50,228.81 
106,217.44 

6,800.63 

62, 47a 21 
2,525.89 



228.242.98 



.5.129.88 



604.15 
702.75 
115.84 

» 132. 97 
20). 85 

1926. .56 
16.60 

1.294.83 
1457.75 



1,422.74 



TaDec.81,1918. 



Operation. 



$16,849.83 
6,331.71 



21.681..54 



819.67 

9,Q3a26 
1,929.68 



11,779.51 



8,346.64 
40,374.30 

2,434.61 

21,213.92 
773.08 



73.142.45 



Mainte- 
nance. 



$389.97 
1.25 



391.22 



1,654.01 

21,677.08 
2,287.67 



25.568.61 



41,882.17 
65,843.14 

4,866.12 

41,256.29 
1,752.81 



604.15 



97.42 
1336.83 



477.63 
1180.26 



662.11 



294.216.48 



107,265.61 



1,237.35 
10,434.18 

207,023.48 
16,926.99 



244,622.00 



49,594.48 



155,l0a.53 

7 



5,129.88 



702.76 
115.84 

1132.97 
108.43 

1689.73 
16.60 

817.20 
> 277. 49 



76a 63 



186, 95a 87 



Total. 



$16,739.80 
6,332.96 



22,072.71 



2,473.68 

30,707.29 
4,167.25 



37,348.12 



60.228.81 
106.217.44 

6,80a63 

62, 47a 21 
2.686.89 



228,242.98 
5,129.88 



604.16 
702.75 
115.84 

1132.97 
205.86 

1926.66 
16.60 

1.294.83 
1457.75 



1.422.74 



294,216.48 



1,287.86 
19,434.18 

207,023.48 
16.926.99 



244,622.00 



49,694.48 



1 Deduct: credits shown are result of overdistribution of clearing accounts. 

3 Items as shown on June 30. 1910, balance sheet minus accruals and adjustments made In 1019, as follows: 

Rentals of buildings $317.66 

Rentals of irrigation water 1,214.47 

Operation and maintenance charge accrued 1,804.06 

Miscellaneous 467.07 



3,803.25 



This arrangement made necessary on account of aoomals for 1018 not being taken into books prior 
to Jan. 1, 1010. 



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IDAHO, KINO HUL PBOTECT. 

Walter Ward, project manager, King Hill, Idaho. 

LOCATION. 

Counties: Elmore, Gooding, Owyhee, and Twin Fallfl. 
Townships: 5 and 6 S., Rs. 8 to 13 E., Boise meridian. 
Railroads: Oregon Short Line. 

Railroad stations and estimated population, June 30, 1919: Glenns Ferry, 1,200, 
King Hill, 150; Hannett, 50. 

WATEB SX7PPLY. 

Source of water 8upi>ly: Malad River, fed by numerous lai^^ springs. 
Area of drainas^ basin: Underground source, area indeterminate. 
Annual run-on in acre-feet: Approximately 1,000,000. 

AOBIOULTXmAL AND CUKATIC CONDITIONS. 

Area for which the service is prepared to supplv water for season 1919: Canals and 
laterals are constructed so that a partial supply can be delivered to about 14,500 acres. 

Length of irrigation season: April 1 to October 10 — 193 days. 

Average elevation of irrigable area: 2,750 feet above sea leveL 

Rainfall on irrigable area: Seven-year average, 9.4 inches. 

Range of temperature on irrigable area: —17° to 111° F. 

Character of soil on irrigable area: Ranges from light to heavy sandy loam; heavy 
day. 

Principal products: Alfalfa, early vegetables, grains, fruit, and stock. 

Principal markets: Portland, Boise, and small towns in southern Idaho. 

CHRONOLOGICAL STTIOCABY. 

First irri^tion by King Hill Inigation Co., season of 1909. 

Reconnoissance made and preliminary surveys begun by the United States in 1916. 

Construction recommended by board of engineers August 17, 1916. 

Construction authorized by Secretary July 2, 1917, 

Reconstruction work begun by Reclamation Service in February, 1918. 

Project 59.4 per cent completed June 30, 1919. 

IBBIGATION PLAN. 

The irrigation plan of the King Hill project pro\ides for the diversion of water from 
the Malaa River, about 1 mile above its confluence with the Snake River, the con- 
veyance of the water through a flume for about 4,000 feet, and the delivery of 300 
second-feet to the canal system of the project by the Idaho Power Co. 

The project main canal is approximately 52 miles long and crosses the Snake River 
at two X)ointB by means of sipnons on steel bridges. About half the irrigable acreage 
lies on each side of the Snake River. The acreage to be supplied by gravity as now 
shown by the irrigable acreage plats is 15,811 with 574 acres to oe supplied by pumps. 

The present plans for the reconstruction of the project call for the building of several 
concrete flumes, concrete and wood stave siphons, wood stave flumes, gunite flumes, 
and gunite lining. 

143 



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144 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

STJMMABY OF GENBBAL DATA FOB KING HILL PBOJBCT TO END 
OF FISCAL YBAB 1919. 

Areas: 

Irrigable acreage when project is complete 16, 385 

Public land entered to June 30, 1919 9, 034 

Public land open to entry on June 30, 1919 372 

State land June 30, 1919 1, 071 

Railroad land June 30, 1919 459 

Private land June 30. 1919 5, 449 

Acreage service coula have supplied in season of 1918 * 14, 500 

* Estimated acreage service can supply in season 1919 * 14, 500 

Estimated acreage service can supply in season 1920 * 14, 500 

Acreage irrigated season of 1918 * 1, 849 

Acreage cropped under irrigation season of 1918 ' 1, 677 

Crops: 

Value of irrigated crops season of 1918 * $45, 588 

Value of irrigated crops per acre cropped ^ $27. 18 

Finances: 

Net construction cost to June 30, 1919 $594. 439. 80 

Per cent completed on June 30, 1919 59. 4 

Appropriated for fiscal year 1920 $332, 000. 00 

Estimated per cent complete by June 30, 1920 79. 5 

Proposed appropriation for fiscal year 1921 $320. 00 

Estimated per cent complete by June 30, 1921 100. 

Appropriation fiscal year 1919 $423, 000. 00 

Increase under 10 per cent provision 42, 300. 00 

Increase miscellaneous collections 7, 680. 30 

Increased compensation 15, 921. 16 

—$488,901.46 

Expenditures chai^geable to 1919 appropriation: 

Disbursements $377, 35a 04 

Transfers : 44, 881. 59 

Current liabilities 16, 765. 84 

Contingent liabilities 11, 292. 28 

$450,289. 75 

Unencuml)ered balance on July 1, 1919 38, 611. 71 

Drainage: 

Mileage of open drains built to June 30, 1919 0. 30 

Estimated acreage protected by drains to June 30, 1919 600 

CONSTBTJCTION DXTBING FISCAL YEAB. 

Caruil system. — (a) Work completed: Three rather important 
structm'es were begun and completed durmg the fiscal year. They 
are as follows: Little Pilgrim siphon, One Mile siphon, and a com- 
bination flume and Uning structure. IJttle Pilgrim siphon is a con- 
crete structure with a 7-foot diameter barrel. One Milie siphon is 
similar ; but the concrete barrel is 7^ feet in diameter. The combina- 
tion structure is a lined section, the outer wall being vertical and 
havingwarped transitions at each end. 

(6) Work in progress: Little reconstruction work can be carried 
on during the irrigation season on this project, and the only work 
in progress at the end of the fiscal year was in connection with the 
Four Mile flume. During the year 2,580 linear feet of the flume 
were placed, making a total to date of 3,860 linear feet, with about 

1 Only partial delivery, capacity Insnffldeiit. 
' Based on crop report (or 3,073 acres. 



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IDAHO, KING HILL PBOJBOT. 



145 



9.400 linear feet yet to be constructed. The portion of this flume 
tnat is now installed has expansion and contraction joints at 24 
feet intervals. Two different types of flumes will be used in the 
construction of the remainder of this flume. One type wiU be semi- 
precast and the other combination concrete and gunite. The side 
walls of one type will be of precast slabs and, the other of gimite. 
The floors of both will be concrete poured in place. Work is now 
being done preparatory to casting the side slabs for the semi-precast 
flume. 

(c) Work begun: Work was begun on the Head End and One Mile 
flumes. These flumes are both concrete, 12 feet 6 inches wide and 5 
feet 2i inches deep; 4,488 linear feet of flume were placed duriag 
the year. Work was also be^un on Big Pilgrim siphon. This is a 
6-foot diameter wood-stave siphon and was all completed on June 
30 except the concrete end structures. 

Telephone system. — ^About 25 mUee of metallic circuit telephone 
line were constructed. 

Permanent improvements. — Six new employees* cottages were com- 
pleted during the year, making 10 now at King Hill. 

SBEPAGB AND DBAIKAOE. 

At the time the Government took over the reconstruction of the 
project one open draia about 0.3 mile long had been constructed. 
This drain protected about 600 acres of land m Pasadena Valley. No 
more drains are contemplated. 

BOABD XBBTINOS. 



Date. 



Sol^leet 



Penoonel. 



Auk. 17,1916 
Sept. 13,1917 
OoL 39,1917 
Apr. 17.1918 
Apr. 18,1918 
1U7 37,1918 
lUy 17,1919 
Do.. 



Report on King Hill 
Kinz HiU leoonstruel 

Estimate to oomfdete 

Constnictkxi proEram. 

Eqnlpment for KJng Hfli prp|eot , 

Changes in construotioo 

Reoonstruction program, fiscal year 1920 

Additknal ooostruotioD needed In excess of pres- 
ent contract. 



A. J. Wney, D. W. Cole, K. J. Hopsoo. 
D. C. Homy, J. L. Savage, J. H. Miner. 
D. C. Hennv. Jas. Mann, J. H. Miner. 
Jas. Munn,Walter Ward, J. H.MIner. 

J. H^liner, Walter Ward, J. L. Savage. 
Jas. Munn, Walter Ward, J. L.aavage. 
Do. 



OPBBATION AND MAINTBNANCE. 

Operation and maintenance of the project is handled by the Eling 
Hill irrigation district. During the summer of 1918 poor deliveries 
were made, but nearly a continuous flow has been had during the 
season of 1919. 

SBTTLBXmT. 

Few new settlers have moved onto the project, as reconstruction 
work has not progressecl to a point such as to insure larger and more 
certain deliveries. 

188554—19 ^10 



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146 EtGHTBENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 



SetUemeni data, Ktng HUl project, 
[Based largely on estimates.] 



Item. 



Total number of farms on proitittM.\' 

Population 

Number of irrigated iarm 9 

Operated by owners or managers. 

Operated by tenants 

Number of towns 

Population 

Total population in towns and farms. 

Number of public schools 

Number of churches 

Number of banks 

Total capital stock 

Amount of deposits 

Number of depositors. 



1917 



225 

350 

125 

110 

15 

3 

1,350 

1,700 

4 
1 

820^000 



1918 



225 

350 

125 

110 

15 

3 

1,425 

1,775 

4 

1 

820,000 

8183,436 

758 



1919 



235 

850 

125 

110 

15 

8 

1,500 

1,850 

4 

l» 

1 

8^000 

8245,545 

718 



. PBINOIPAL CBOF8. 

The principal ormij^^own on the project during 1918 were alfalfa, 
wheat, potatoes, iruit, melons, cantaloupes, and garden stuffs. 
Fruit was hit very hard last year with the frost, and poor delivery of 
water caused the crops in general to be very poor. Early potatoes, 
of which there is now a good crop, sold in the early part oi June at 
12^ cents per pound. 

Crop report. King HiU projecty Idaho, year 1918, 
[Dato ftimished by the King Hill InigatloQ District.] 





Area 
(acres). 


Unit of 
yield. 


Yidds. 


Yahies. 


Crop. 


Total. 


Average 
per acre* 


Per unit 
of yield. 


ToUl. 


Per acre. 


AUUf^hay 


1,186 

206 
6 
6 
1 

25 
38 
13 
6 
8 
15 

7 
1 

43 

8^ 

.12^ 

» 


Ton 


3,112 


2.81 


811.71 


6 

20 
675 
852 

90 
196 

80 
300 

97 
1,440 


833.04 


AlfalfesTmMl 


25.00 


Apples 


Peund.... 
Bushel.... 

...do 

Ton 

...do 

Bushel.... 

Ton 

Ponied . . - - 


94,560 

1 
2 

45 
547 

10 


459 
li 

2* 

1.8 
14.4 

.77 


.0325 

1.50 

6.00 
10.00 
15.00 

1.56 

9.00 


14.89 


BaS^.....; 


2.00 


Beans 


1.00 


Cane 


20.00 


Clover hay • 


27.00 


Com, Indian t . - - 


22.43 


Com' fodder 


7.00 


Fniiis, small .....--. 


39.00 


Garden... 






.. . . 




10.00 


Hay 


Ton 

Bushel.... 


30 
100 


2 
4.8 


i6.66 

.97 


20.00 


Ste.:::::::::::. :::::.:.. 


4.40 


Pasture.. 


20.00 


Peaches . . . . , . . . ^ . - 


Pound.... 

Busliel.... 

...do 

...do 

...do 

Tota 


None. 
None. 

697 
None. 

504 








Peas. 










Potatoes 


16.2 


1.96 


1,366 


31.79 


Rye 




WneaV.",]!!.!!!"! !.!!!!.! 


4 


* i.855 


035 


7.48 


Less duplicated areas. 






land average 




tf,588 


27.18 


Total cropa 


1,677 

84 
24 
55 











Arew. 


A<ves. 


Parma. 


Per 
cent of 
project. 


Irrigated, no crop: 

Nonbearing orchard. . 
Young albSfb 


Total irrlga 
Total irrigf 
Total crop] 


kble area farms reported 
tted area fftrms reports 
E)ed area farms reported 


I 

1 




3,073 
1,677 


56 
66 
50 


18.8 
11.3 
10.2 


Fall plowed 




Miscellaneous 








Total irrigated 


1,840 

















Note.— Low yields due to irregular flow caused by breaks In canal. The project was built under private 
auspices, and the Oovemment is undertaking its reoonstruotioa. Operation and malntenanoe are handled 
by the settlers through an irrigation district. 



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IDAHO, KING HILL PROJECT, 



147 



FINANCIAL BTATBKBNT. 

Condensed balance sheet y King Bill project, June 30, 1919. 

In Yentory of materials and supplies on hand $65, 506. 90 

Aocxxmts reoeiyable 4, 186. 31 

Gross construction cost 1591,362.37 

Net kMS on incidental operations 3,077.43 

Net oonsti notion cost 504,439.80 

Accounts payable 28,142.78 

Oapital investment: 

Disbursement, transfier, and joint construction vouchers received $653, 837. 78 

€k>Uectian, transfer, reftmd, and Joint construction vouchers issued 17, 837. 55 

Net investment 635,99023; 

Feature costs of King Hill project, Kxng Htll, Idaho, to June 30, 1919, 



Examinations and surveys , 

Canal system: 

Four Mile flume 

Waeteway at station 923 

Roads-Hillstone's to Little Pilgrim 

Wood-stave flume 

Oonitefiume 

Wasteway at station 1394 

Oanal enlargement , 

Canal surveys 

Road, Little Pilgrim to headworks 

One Mile flume 

Little Pflcrun siphon 

Big Pilgrnn siphon. , 

Deer Oulch siphon , 

^SinhonNo. 1, oetterments , 

Flume, station 71+84 oontraot 

Flume, station 71+84, Oovernment foroes. , 

Onidte lining} station 170 

Ouniiie repass, stattdn 170 to 235 

Wa»tew«r^No.3 

Sit^on, station 171 

Wasteway No. 7 

Waelewi^No.8 

Trestle No. 8 

ConerBt« flame, trestle section 

Bridge at station 181 

BigPllpima« bridge 

Snake River oridge, Kinx HQl 

Snake River bridge at Olenns Ferry 

Combination Uninig and flume 



Fiscal 
year 
1919. 



1 1320. 19 

63,109.67 

942.44 

10,25L25 



Total canal system. 



Farm units: Imgable lands. 
Permanent improvements: 

Lands porehased 

Buildings 



Total permanent inprovements. . 

Telephone ssrstem: 
Teleph 



fe ph one sys tem. . 
Olenns Ferry Hue . . 



Total can of construction features. . 



in plmt aoeoants 

clearing accounts. 



Gross con to June 30. 1919. . 



i^eoB revenues earned during construction period: 

Rental of buUdinx^ 

Contractor's i^ignt refunds 

Miseellaneotti revenues 

Loss on hojpital operations. 



Total revenues 

Net oonstroctlon cost to June 30, 1919. 



' Deduct. 



2,627.29 

68.92 

20.81 

4,406.37 

17,294.96 

79,733.51 

29,822.89 

52,688.39 I 

585.10 

15.49 

33,284.15 

30,312.46 

258.88 

960.04 

83.36 

10,401.73 

4L90 

20. r2 

(i9.90 

56.00 

491.91 

1,518.87 

84.76 

65.28 

5,992.13 



345,202.01 



205.40 
19,113.59 



19,31899 



7,872.00 
886.80 



8,267.80 



372,458.61 



372,468.61 



1,575.38 

44a 41 

96.54 

^6,086.16 



13, 973. 83 



Total 
to June 
30, 1919. 



$20,092.80 

88,074.39 

3,472.20 

22,732.36 

3,573.90 

14,734.81 

984. 3S 

3,220.9» 

12,994.56 

17,294.96 

79,733.51 

29,822.89 

52,e88.39 

585.10 

15.49 

33,284.15 

30,312.46 



960.04 

83.36 

10,401.73 

4L90 

20.52 

69.90 

66.00 

. 491.94 

1,518.57 

84.76 

65.28 

5,992.13 



413,519.84 



2,rtia78 

1,117.60 
29,068.40 



30,17600 



7,872.00 
885.80 



8,257.80 



474,957.22 



110,009.46 
6,395.67 



591,362.37 



1,835.03 

44a 41 

96.54 

» 5, 449. 41 



13,077.48 



376,432.44 594,439.80 



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148 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL BBPORT OF BEGLAMATION SEBYIGE. 

Statement ofeoit by calendar years, K%ng Hdl project, 

Constmo- 



Year ending Dec. 31— 

1916 

1917 

1918 

Jan. 1 to June 30, 1919 

Subtotal 

Plant accounts to Juno 30, 1919 

Unadjusted clearing accounts to June 30, 1919. 

Total 



Si, 687. M 

21,53a 80 

254,805.47 

197,433.01 



474,957.22 

110,000.48 

6,395.67 



Statement of cost by fiscal years y King HUl project. 



Year ending June 30: 

1916 

1917 

1918 

1919 



SubtotaL 

riant accounts to Juno 3D, 1919 

Unadjusted clearing accoimts to June 30, 1919.. 



Total. 



501,382.37 



Construe 
ti:«. 



8738.39 

1,252.41 

100,507.81 

372,458.61 

474,957.22 

110,009.48 

6,395.67 



501,80.97 



Estimated cost of contemplated work, King Hill project, during fiscal year 19t0, 



Feature. 



Canal system: 

Concrete bench flumes 

Deer Qulch siphon 

Head End flume (including drainage protection) . . 
Wasteway or regulating device (near neadworks) . 

Wasteway No. 2 

Wasteway No. 9 

Wasteway No. 8 and trestle 

Big Pilgrim siphon (inlet and outlet) 

King IllU brioge repairs 

Roads 

Surveys, testing, etc 

Tuanna flume and wasteway 

Reimbursable accounts 



Total. 



Subfeature. 



1246,000 
40,000 
10,000 
4,000 
2,700 
2,800 
3,000 
2,600 
2,500 
3,000 
1,000 
13,000 



Prlnctpal 
feature. 



I330»50a00 

i,5oaoo 



832,000.00 



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IDAHO, MINIDOKA PBOJECT. 

Barry Dibble, project maDager, Burley, Idaho. 
LOGATION. 

Countiee: Minidoka and Cassia, Idaho; Jackson Lake Reservoir, Lincoln. Wyo. 

Townships: 8 to 11 S., Ra. 21 to 25 E., Boise^ meridian; Jackson Lake Reservoir, 
Tpa. 44 to 46 N., Rs. 114 to 116 west, sixth principal meridian, Wyoming. 

Railroads: Ore^ron Short Line. 

Railroad stations and estimated population June 30, 1919: Rupert, 2,000; Heybum, 
300; Burley, 3,500; Paul, 500; Dedo, 250; and Acequia, 50. 

WATEB SUPPIiY. 

Source of water supply: Snake River, supplemented by storage. 

Area of drainage basin: 22,600 square miles above diversion dam. 

Annual run-off in acre-feet of Snake River at Montgomery's ferry and Neeley 
(16,000 square miles), 1896 to 1918: Maximum 8,600,000; minimum 4,146,000; mean 
6,800,000. South Fork of Snake River at Moran, Wyo. (820 square miles), 1904 to 
1918; maximum 1,480,000; minimum 779,500; mean 1,180,000. The above record is 
based on the year October 1 to September 30. 

AGBICTTLTT7BAL AND CLIMATIO 0ONDITION8. 

Area for which the service is prepared to supply. water, season of 1919: 12.1,S9? 
acres. 

Area under water-right applications and rental contracts, season of 1919: 120,048 
acres. 

Length of irrigation season: From April 1 to October 20 (203 days). 

Average elevation of irrigable area: 4,225 feet above sea level. 

Rainfall on irrigable area: 13| years; average, 12.10 inches; 1918, 7.80 inches. 

Range of temperature on irrigable area: —24^ to 104° F. 

Character of soil of irrigable area: On north side of river, sand and sandy loam pre- 
dominate; about one-third of the area is clay loam; on south side of river the soil is 
a disintegrated ash. 

Principal products: Alfalfa, grasses, wheat, oats, bieet seed, clover seed, sugar beets, 
and potatoes. 

Principal markets: Pocatello, Idaho; Salt Lake, Utah; Butte and Helena, Mont«; 
Portlano, Oreg. 

LANDS OPENED FOB IBBIGATION. 

Bates of public notices and orders relatin?: thereto (gravity unit): Public notices — 
March 9, 1907; November 23, 1908; February 11, Mar( h 30, 1909; February 7, March 
22, June 10, October 13, November 3 and 25, 1910; January 23, December 30, 1911; 
March 21, 1912; June 23, 1913; September 24, 1914; February 27, March 20, 191 >; 
March 4, May 4 and 27, June 10, 22, and 26, October 2, November 22, 1916; 
March 26, 1917. Orders— July 19, December 10, 1907; Julv 9, 1908; December 27, 
1910; March 18 and 31, May 4, June 8, 1911; February 26, March 19 and 25, July 21, 
1913; January 19, March 26 and 31, 1914; March 8 and July 13, 1915; April 7, June 26, 
1916; March 23, 1917. 

South side pumping unit: Public notices — November 3, 1915; May 25, 1916; April 
10, 1917; April 2, 1918. Orders— March 24, 1911; March 19, May 13, October 10, 
1912; March 25, 1913; March 23, 1914; March 1, 1915; March 23^ 1917. 

Location of lands opened: Tps. 8 to 11 S., Rs. 21 to 25 E., Boise meridian. 

The annual operation and maintenance charge is based on the amount of water 
used. For 1919 the gravity unit, which is being operated by the Minidoka irrigation 
district, with headquarters at Rupert, Idaho, has been aivided into seven zones, 
based on soil condition, in which 2 to 8 acre-feet of water are allowed for the minimum 
annual charge, this minimum charge to be determined at the end of the irrigation 

149 



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150 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

season. The 1918 charge for operation and maintenance was fixed at $1.50 per acre 
with a graduated charge for excess water. On the pumping unit the rate for 1919 and 
thereafter until further notice as set by public notice oated April 2, 1918, is 50 cents 
per acre-foot used up to and including; June 5 and $1 per acre-foot for water used after 
June 5 and on or before October 20, with a minimum of $1.50 per acre for each irrigable 
acre, whether water is used or not. Provisions are made for the use of water after 
October 20, which is optional with the water users, at the rate of $2 per day for each 
farm unit of 80 acres or fraction thereof, provided the charges for this service are de- 
posited with the special fiscal agent before receiving Uie water. No service wUl be 
commenced, however, unless deposits aggregating $200 per day for a reasonable period 
shall be made before October 20. No lands are operated on a rental basis. 

CHBONOLOGICAL 8T7MMABY. 

First surveys with reference to storage possibilities in 1902. 

Reconnaissance and preliminanr surveys for main project begun March, 1903. 

Construction recommended by board of engineers March 21, 1904. 

Construction authorized by Secretary April 23, 1904. 

Minidoka dam completed September, 1906. 

Temporary dam on the Moran site, Jackson Lake, completed in 1907. 

First irrigation by Reclamation Service season of 1907. 

Jackson Lake Dsjn completed November 25, 1911. 

Contract for enlargement of Jackson Lake Reservoir entered February 25, 1913. 

Enlargement of Jackson Lake Reservoir completed, Decraiber, 1916. 

Gravity unit 99.7 per cent completed June 30, 1919, including drainage. 

South side pumping unit 95.9 per cQnt completed June 30, 1919. 

Jackson Lake storage 99.4 per cent completed June 30, 1919. 

Commercial unit 24.9 per cent completed June 30, 1919. 

Entire project (except extensions) 91,1 per cent completed June 30, 1919. 

ntBIGATION puor. 

The irrigation plan of the Minidoka project provides for th<e diversion of the waters 
of the Snake River bv a combined storage, diversion, and power dam about 6 miles 
south of Minidoka. Idaho, into two canal systems, one on either side of the river, 
watering lands in the vicinity of Acequia, Rupert, Heybum, Paul, Declo, and Burley, 
Idaho. Power developed at the dam is utilized primarily for pumping water from 
the canals to irrigate high lands, but also for pumping for drainage purposes and for 
furnishing heat, light, and current for commercial use to the towns on the project and 
the farms adjacent to them. The United States claims all waste, seepage, spring, and 
percolating water arising within the project, and proposes to use this water in connec- 
tion therewith. Storage for the project is provided mainly by a reservoir constructed 
in the upper drainage basin of Snake River, at Jackson Lake, Wyo. This is supple- 
mented by the reservoir formed by the Minidoka dam and known as Lake Walcott. 
Jackson Lake Dam and Minidoka Dam are completed. Jackson Lake Dam has been 
raised 17 feet, makinjg the capacity of the reservoir 789,000 acre-feet. During the 
1919 fiscal year the nver channel below Jackson Lake Dam was deepened, making 
available approximately 57,000 acre-feet additional storage which brings the available 
capacity of the reservoir to 846,000 acre-feet. The irrigation system for the gravity 
unit and the south side pumping unit, and the drainage system for the gravity unit 
have been completed. 



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IDAHO, MINIDOKA PROJECT. 



151 



8X7MKABY OF GBNEBAX DATA FOB MINIDOKA PBOJBOT TO END 
OF FISCAL YEAB 1019. 





Gravity. 


South Side 
pumping. 


Jackson* 
Lake. 


1 . 
Commer- 
cial 
power. 


New units. 


Total. 


Areas: 

Irrigabk acreage when 

project is complete.. 

Public land entered to 

Jane 30, 1919. 


72,428 

65,022 

377 

18 

6,116 

72,428 

72,428 

72,428 
60,206 

56,670 
— _ 

{3,044,760.00 
53.70 


48,064 
30,264 


1 
1 




121,302 

96,186 

377 






Public land open to 
entry on June 30.1919. 







Stateland unaold June 
30,1919 




1 

1 




18 
24,816 

121,392 

121,392 

121,392 
105,061 

98,182 

85,168,078.00 
52 64 


Private land June 30, 
1919 


18,700 

48,064 

48,064 

48,064 
44,765 

41,512 
82,123,318.00 


1 




Acreage service could 
have supplied in sea- 
son of 1018 


1 

1 - - 


=r~=-=:=.Z= 


Estimatedacreageser- 
vioe can supply in 
season 1919 






Estimated acreage ser^ 
vice can supply in 
season 1900 






Acreage trrigated, sea- 
son 0^1918 


1 




irrintion season of 
1918. 






Crops: 
Value of irrigated 
crops, season of 1918. 


1 


= T-.~ - — rz 


Value of irrigated 
crops per acre cropped 


51.20 










837,^12.26 




Finances: 
Net construction cost 

to June cO, 1919 

Per cent completed on 
June 30,1910 


82,828,001.90 
00.7 


82, no, 518. 52 
95.0 


8103,762.04 |8115,848.07 

0^.4 ; 94.0 

1 


85,805,043.68 
tl 1 


Appropriated for fis- 
cal year 1020 




8^:63,000.00 


Estimated percent 
complete by June 30, 
1020 , 


00.7 


05.0 


100.0 






tion fiscal year 1021. 






817,0C0 

8489,000.00 

42,3CO.0O 

188,729.16 
15,550.90 

13,347.62 


Announced construe- 
tion charges per acre: 
822, rM, 842, 852, 
856.50.857.50,866. 

Appropriation fiscal 
year 1010 






) 




Decrease under 10 per 
cent provision 






1 




collections 


1 


1 
















Increased* 'compensa- 
tion 
























Total 












609,327.68 














Expenditures charge- 
able to 1010 H>pro- 
priatirn: 
Dttbursements ...... 












244,553.32 
21,220.07 
28,060.18 
4,711.97 


Transfers , 












Current liabilities. . . . 












Contingent liabilities. 
























Total 












298,545.54 














Unencumbered balance 
on July 1, 1010 












810,788.14 














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152 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL. REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE, 



STJIOCABY OF GBNEBAL DATA FOB HINIBOKA PBOJBCT TO END 
OF FISCAL YEAB 1 01 0— Concluded. 





Gravity. 


' South Side 
pumping. 


Jackscn 
Lake. 



1429,412.50 


Commer- 

dal 
power. 


New vaaits. 


TotaL 


Repayments: 
value of construction 
water righ t contracts. 


12,882,631.45 


$2,753,308.97 






16, 045, 252.92 








Construction charges— 
Accrued to June :0, 
1919, (including sup- 
plemental construc- 
tton) 


769,405.93 
762,714.79 


164,283.58 
167,484.51 


102,675.28 
102,675.28 






1, 036,3m. 7» 
1,012,874.58 


Collected to June: 0, 
1919,(lncludlngsup. 
plemental construo- 
Hon^ 












Uncollected on June 
30, 1919 (including 
supplemental con- 
struction) 


16,691.14 


6,799.07 








23,490.21 




46,137.12 
46,137.12 






Operation andmainte- 

nance^hargesCpub- 

Uc notice): 

Accrued to June 30, 

1919 


456,168.59 
377,146.13 


264,324.40 
248,079.19 




766,630.11 


Collected to June 30, 
1919 






6n,362.44 










Uncollected on June 
30, 1919 


79,022,46 


16,245.21 












95,267.07 












Accn ed to June 30. 
1919 


63,388.20 
63,388. cO 


109,899.36 
109,899.36 


60,844.86 
60,844.86 




234,132.52 


Collected toJuneSO, 
1919 






234,132.52 









Power charges- 
Accrued to June SO, 
1919 




253,890.26 
235,072.48 


253,890.26 


Collected to June SO, 
1919 










235,072.48 














Uncollected on June 
30 1919 . . 








18,817.78 




18,817.78 











Drainage: 
Estimated acreage 
damaged by seepage 
to June SO, 1919 








590 


Miies of open drains 
built to June SO, 1919. 


109 










109 


Estimated acreage pro- 
tected by drains to 
June 30, 1919 


'! 




30,000 


Estimated acreage to 
be protected by au- 
tiiorised system . 


1 






30,000 


Coit ol drainage works 
to June 30 1919.. . 


1 






$749,429.74 











CONSTBUCTION DUBING FISCAL YEAB. 

Gravity system, — Under the terms of the contract entered into 
between the Reclamation Service and the Minidoka irrigation dis- 
trict,-dated December 2, 1916, the district assumed the operation 
and maintenance of the gravity imit. All work on this unit was 
handled by the Minidoka irrigation district and paid for by them 
out of their operation and maintenance collections. 

S(m1h Side pumping unit — ^All construction on the irrigation sys- 
tem of this imit was completed on Jime 30, 1918. Replacements 



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IDAHO, MINIDOKA PROJECT. 153 

and other work were handled by the United States Reclamation 
Service, and paid for out of the operation and maintenance ftmds. 
Pitictically all the new work on minor structiu^es was done imder 
field-work orders, and paid for by the landowner benefited. New 
lateral construction amotmted to 0.23 of a mile. An extension of 
the powerhouse was planned to be started in the fall of 1918. The 
crew was being organized in September when it was foimd that the 
money available in the reclamation fund was not sufficient to com- 
plete the work; construction was therefore discontinued. 

Permanent improvements. — During the fiscal year 11 cottages were 
constructed for the use of project employees who are being charged 
a reasonable rental for their use. 

North Side pumping unit. — Surveys on this tract continued through- 
out the year. Sixty-nine thousand acres of topography, on a scale 
of 400 feet to the inch, were mapped. The topography is 63.5 per 
cent complete. Three himdred and forty miles of section lines were 
retraced, making the retracement 94 per cent complete. Three hun- 
ted miles of level control were completed, makmg this feature 72 
per cent complete. 

OOHMEBOIAL POWBB. 

One of the most interesting.developments on the Minidoka project 
has been the use of electricity in the towns and on the farms for 
domestic and commercial purposes. The power-plant capacity that 
is required for irrigation pumping in the summer time is now entirely 
used in the winter time. The bulk of this power is used for electn- 
cally heating buildings in the towns. This electricity is sold at a very 
low rate. 1'he Reclamation Service has installed substations in each 
of the towns and these now are all operating imder full load in the 
winter. During the past year an extremely rapid growth has oc- 
curred in the demand for electricity on the part of the farmers. This 
demand has been supplied by instaUing substations at convenient 
points on 30,000-volt transmission lines of the project. From these 
substations the farmers, throueh their mutual organizations, build 
distribution systems to reach tne members. The companies handle 
all details of the distribution and accounting with the membership, 
while the Reclamation Service delivers the power at wholesale to the 
company at the substation. This method of handling this business 
has worked out very satisfactorily and with economy both for the 
Reclamation Service and for the farmers. On Jime 30 nearly 700 
farms were being supplied with electric power. A large additionid 
number were reached by the lines, but for one reason or another have 
not been connected. 

Three substations wore built during the year to supply these lural 
companies. These were designated as Riverside, Central, and East 
End. I'hese are of the outdoor type, transformers and switching 
apparatus being mounted on steel towers. Each of them has a pres- 
ent capacity of 30 kilowatts. The substation at Paul was completed 
during the year. This substation supplies the rapidly growing town 
of Paul as well as a large number of rural consumers. 

Several new power companies were Organized during the year, the 
principal among these bemg the Empire Electric Co., the VValcott 
Electric Co., the Ferry Light & Power Co., and the West Budge Power 
& Light Co., all of them mutual companies. 



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154 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPOKT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

The revenue obtained from the sale of electricity during the fiscal 
year amounted to $69,300 as compared with $56,500 during the pre- 
ceding year. This represents an increase of $12,800, or 22.7 per cent. 

A canvass of the consumers' load conditions was made on January 
1, 1919, from which the information presented in the following tables 
was obtained. The first table shows the connected load and the 
second the amount of equipment that has been installed. This is in 
addition to the lines and pumping stations belonging to the Reclami^ 
tion Service. 

Connected load for Jan, i, 1919, \n HlowatU. 



(^ontnftotor. 



Con- 
sumer 

con- 
nected. 



Lights. 



! AppU- 

, ances, ' Motors, 
' including 2 hone- • 
motors up power and 
'to 2 horse-! larger. 



Heaters. 



B.B.Skln]Mr 

Ropart Electric Co. 

aty of Hurley 

Amalgamated Sugar Co 

IClnido k a North Side Poww Co 

Paul Klectric Co 

Farmers' Flectric Co 

Schodde Flectric Co 

Burlev Milling* Elevator Co 

Village of Albion 

Acequia l^airy A Produce Co 

Rural r lectrk Co ' 

Unity Light* TowerCo. i 

Wee^t Knd Power Co 

MetcherMlninit* Milling Co ! 

Fruitland Drive Power * Light Co, . . , 

Korth Heybum Klectric Co • 

Ri\*erside Vktotric Co i 

East Kml KWctric Co 

DecloU^hl A Power Co 

Central Ktactrk Co, 

SattU contracts 

Total ~ 





fiiowalte. 


Kilownttt. 


52 


24.S15 


24.606 


550 


290.145 


342.615 


1,125 


433.885 


1,183.805 


1 


5.270 


12.520 


14 


6.410 


11.310 


150 


73.995 


183.690 


5 


L9T0 


3.215 


10 


5.520 


7.850 


39 


20.300- 


28.420 


135 


§6.530 


261.190 


14 


6.050 


3.865 


15 


9.745 


14.400 


100 


35.090 


91.340 


6 


2.445 


7.180 


1 


9.axi 


2.915 


3 


2 IW 


1.365 


5 


i.ev'o 


3.080 


53 


25.565 


27.900 


25 


10 090 


6 245 


29 


9.425 


33.5S5 


19 


SLnTI) 


ia4a5 


41 


23-0*) 


68-615 



I 

I 146.635 
I 26L375 

387.375 
, 200.625 
I 3.750 

125.625 

'■""isLTio 

; 12.375 
' 19.875 
, L500 



iraowafto. 

136.000 

1,606.000 

2,686.000 

12.000 

12.000 

264.000 



.600 
2n.790 > 



22.875 



233.290 ; 
3.790 



14.600 



L500 
7.500 1 



316.875 



5L000 



Total 



KOowoUm. 

332.045 

2,560.136 

4,60L065 

330.415 

33.470 

647.310 

5.185 

32.120 

61.005 

625.345 

U.415 

24.145 

149.306 

9.625 

299.165 

7.915 

4.685 

53.365 

17.835 

50.510 

19.275 



2.3»4 1.073.106 2.329.965 1.763.625 5,119.350 10,286.045 



£<; u I pment insialU-d. 



Miles oX line. 


1 










Maxi- 








Sin^k- 


Three- 




damand. 


pba:-*. 


phftMw 


. 








rri..igi[rai«atfi 


3-0 


1-2 


S 


U3.0 


li-«5 


16 


i,4«: 


1,996.0 


ia 


10.0 


3,906 . 


3,090.0 




-3 


90 ' 


r».6 


3.i 


-6 


34 1 


18.4 


14-2 


6.5 


430 


3M.0 


IS 




5 


5.0 


s 


iwO 


35 


10.8 


I 3 


2 


63 


16.0 


<0 


L2 


aa6 


SliLO 


»>.> 




36 


3.3 


2.< 




31 


4.0 


no 


it 


M3 


S2.0 


I 5 




n 


2.4 


.5 


Li 


196 


M6.0 


.5 


4 


8 


4.4 


I 5 




T 


2.0 


U.i 


3.3 


9» 


13.8 


J. 5 


X* 


49 


16.0 


1 'i 


W-J 


51 


7.6 


2 } 


5- J 


23 


4.8 


4.5 


: i 


m 


45S.O 



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IDAHO, MINIDOKA PBOJEOT. 165 

BEEP AGE AND DBAINAGE. 

The drainage system on the gravity unit was operated effectively 
during the season of 1918. The system discharged 94,825 acre-feet 
of water, of which 7,540 acre-feet were pumped into one of the 
canals and used for irrigation. The total discharge shows an increase 
of 21,837 acre-feet over that of 1917. There is, however, a con- 
siderable element of error in these figures because of diflGiculty in the 
establishment of gauging stations which are not affected by outside 
conditions. There has been more or less controversy during the pjast 
yjar over the advisability of putting checks in some of the drains. 
The checks are proposed by some of the farmers with a view to 
rei^ating the height of the ground-water plane and using it to sub- 
imgate the farms. The general idea is that if this were done it 
womd reduce the amount of water that it is necessary to apply to 
the surface, particularly in the latter portion of the irrigation season. 
The farmers who oppose this view are usually those whose ground is 
80 located that the water plane would come unduly near the surface 
if these checks were installed. On November 1, 1917, the directors 
of the Minidoka irrigation district applied to the Reclamation Serv- 
ice for permission to install checks m some of the drains, but after 
careful consideration the directors were informed that this was not 
regarded as advisable. 

OPEBATIOK AND MAINTENANCE. 

Gravity uniti — The operation and maintenance of this tmit was 
handled by the Minidoka irrigation district under contract made 
with the Secretary of the Interior dated December 2, 1916. The 
district was handicapped during the year by shortage of labor and, 
consequently, less than the usual amount of canal cleaning was done 
in the fall of 1918 and the spring of 1919. However, the system 
had been well cleaned during the preceding winter and the lack of 
cleaning at this time was not a serious matter. The irrigation dis- 
trict installed a scoop-wheel pumping plant to pump out of the C-2 
canal, which results in giving considerably better service to the 
1710-2, 1751, and 1752 laterals. 

Sovili Side pumping unit. — ^The operation and maintenance of this 
unit has been handled directly by the Reclamation Service. The 
winter was mild and work was carried on almost continuously, 
although with small crews. Labor was inefficient and difficult to 
secure, particularly in the fall of 1918. On July 26, 1918, a break 
occurrea in the main South Side Canal and did some damage to 
adjacent land. The break was repaired and service resumed within 
two days. The South Side pumpmg stations shut down on October 
20, 1918, and started again on April 28, 1919. 

By a vote of the farmers at the election held on March 5, 1918, 
on the South Side pumping unit, the Burley irrigation district was 
organized; wiUi the orgamzation of the district, the old South Side 
Minidoka Water Users' Association (Ltd.), went out of existence. 
^ General. — ^The precipitation during the winter of 1918-19 was light 
and although Jackson Lake Reservoir finished the irrigation season 
of 1918 with approximately 97,000 acre-feet of water in the reservoir, 
and although the gatf s were closed and all water stored after Sep tern- 



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156 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE, 



ber 15, 1918, yet the reservoir did not fill, and in fact the maxinniia 
in the reservoir reached only 571,000 acre-feet on June 3, when it 
became necessary to let the natural flow past the dam in orderjto 
supply prior rights. Drawing on water stored in Jaokson Lake Dam 
began on June 6, 1919. Lake Walcott was also drawn upon to supply 
the canals at Minidoka on Jime 6. At that time Lake Walcott was 
full, containing 60,000 acre-feet. Before Jime 30 it became very 
apparent that the irrigation season of 1919 was to be one of extremely 
short water supply. 

Historicdl review, Mimdoha project. 



Acreage for which service was prepared to 

supply water 

Acreage irrigated 

Miles of canal operated , 

Water diverted (acre-fbet) , 

Water delivered to land 

Per acre of land Irrigated (acre-feet) 



1014 



117,000 
81,fi00 

520 
604,000 
353,000 

4.3 



1915 



120.000 
83,562 

590 
609,434 
323,479 

3.9 



1916 



120,300 
89,900 

615 
640,432 
334,649 

3.7 



1917 



1918 



120.852 

99,020 

633.19 

616,228 I 

305,278 . 

3.1 



121,392 
105,061 
634.37 
745,821 
390,90) 
3.7 



1919 



121,392 
110,000 
034.60 



SETTLEMEKT. 

Prosperous conditions continued during the 1919 fiscal year. 
Good prices were obtained for all farm prooucts, and the yield of all 
the principal crops was heavy. Many farms changed hands, at high 
prices. The population continued to increase. The number of 
people on the farms was estimated at 8,490 and those in towns at 
6,600. All towns have made a substantial growth during the year. 
In Burley a potato floxu- mill and starch factory, a dancing pavilion^ 
several business blocks, and many new residences were constructed,. 
The pavmg in the business s*?ction of the town was completed. At 
the election in November, 1918, the county seat of Cassia Coi^ntj 
was moved from the old town of Albion to Burley. In Rupert 
several new business blocks, a new school (the Pershing), and ma^y 
new residences were constructed, and the sewer system completecU 
Paul voted $42,000 bonds for water works system and other mimicipi^ 
improvements. Considerable concrete walk was laid in the various 
towns. An additional $100,000 of highway bonds has been voted 
by the Burley highway district in Cassia Coxmty. In addition to 
the expenditures by the highway district the farmers have cooperated 
to gravel long stretches of lateral roads; The general c^nditioi^ of 
the roads on the pumping unit is now excellent. In the spriiig of 
1918, the Paul-Heyburn highway district and the Rupert highway 
district each voted $200,000 bond issues for improving roads. This, 
in addition to the State and Federal aid which will be giv^n thes^ 
highway districts, will put the roads on the gravity umt in much 
better shape than they have been in the past. The construotioa 
of good roads and the very general extension of electric power lines 
through the country have had a material effect in raising the prices 
of outlying farms until these bring almost as much per acre as the 
farms close to town. 



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IDAHO, MINIDOKA PBOJBOT. 
SeUlement data, Mitddoha project. 



157 



Item. 



1914 


1915 


1916 


1917 


2,118 


2,164 


2,322 


2,327 


5,200 


5,800 


6,468 


7,467 


1,741 


1,718 


1,760 


2,196 


1,525 


1,402 


1'^ 


1,726 


210 


811 


408 


470 


5,200 

5 

8,000 


6,800 
3,500 


5,800 

5 

4,100 


7,467 

6 

5,300 


8,200 


9,300 


10,568 


12,767 


21 


21 


21 


20 


13 


21 


21 


25 


6 


6 


6 


6 


$137,500 


$140,000 


$140,000 


$165,000 


1577,007 


$821,909 


$1,311,641 


$2,522,764 


4,110 


4,721 


6,370 


7,350 



1918 



1919 



Total munber of tonoB on project. 

Popolation 

Number of irrigated fiums. 

Operated by owners or 
aiders 

Operated by tenants. . . , 

Population 

Number of towns 

Population 

Total population towns and farms. 
Number of public sohoob 

Number of <*hurches 

Number of banks 

Total capital stock . . . 

Amount of deposits. . 

Number of depssitors 



2,840 
8,490 
2,208 

1,666 

662 

8,490 

6 

6,600 

15,000 

21 

25 

8 

$240,000 

$2,543,343 

10,663 



2,340 
9,000 



9,000 

6 

8,000 

17,000 

28 

25 

8 

$260,000 

$3,725,691 

11,086 



PBINCIPAIi CBOP8. 

The total production and crop value for the year 1918 were slightly 
larger than previous years. The area in cultivation on the project 
is now such a large percentage of the possible total that it is improb- 
able that any great increase will be shown in the future. The average 
crop value per acre on the gravity unit was $53.70; on the south side 
ptrmpin^ unit, $51.20; and for the whole project, $52.64. Of the 
principiu crops potatoes had the highest value, averaging $121.71 
per acre. Sugar beets stood second in value, averaging $107.50 
per acre. Alf df a continued to be the principal crop with an increase 
of 2,957 acres or 6.9 per cent over 1917, and had the highest total 
value of $3,203,000. The wheat acreage increased 6,021 acres or 
nearly 40 per cent over 1917, and is second in total value of $1,028,- 
000. Potatoes, sugar beets, clover seed, and oats follow in the 
order named. 



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158 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF: R^GIAMATION SERVICE. 

Crop report^ gravity unUf Mirddoha projecty IdahOy year of 1918, 

(Date furnished by the MlnMoiairrlg8ttwi«lstrtct.r 



,.. 


Area 

(acres). 

■ 

28,503 

284 

608 

562 

2,448 

130 

796 

1,228 

338 

55 

29 

540 


Unit Of 
yield. 

Ton 

Bushel.... 

...do 

...do 

Ton 

Pound 

Ton 

Bushel.... 
...do 

Ton 

Pound 


Yields. 


Per unit 
of yield. 


Valuer 


Crop. 


Total. 

113,764 
1,003 

22,288 
6,733 

26,795 

65,304 
1,999 
6,063 

11,568 
218 

36,400 


Average 
per acre. 


1 
Total. ' Pf 

11,465,042 


)raore. 


Alfalfa 


3.05 
3.8 

31.9 

12 

11 
502 
2.5 
4.9 

34 

4 

906 


$13.00 

9.60 

1.40 

4.20 

10 

.35 
13 
22 
1.60 
10 
.05 


tsi.oa 


Alfalfa seed 


10,403 37. OC 


Barley 


31,203 44.70 


BaW 


28.379 ^ 50.40 
267; 057 i 109.40 


Beets, sugar 


Beet seed. 


23,856 1 176.00 


Clover hay 


35,967 j 32.00 


Clover seed 


138,365 108.40 


Com 


18,509 54.70 


Com fodder 


2,184 40.00 


Small firults 


1,325 45.40 


Oarden 


40,756 92.10 


Hay mixed 


216 


Ton 


318 
185 
32 
92,629 
610 


1 
13.7 

5 
31 
24 


10 
7 

9.60 
1.00 
3.40 


2,188: 10.10 


Manglfls 


13 

6 

2,996 

25 

4,523 

100 

2,318 

'l51 

9,013 


...do 

Bushel.... 

...do 

...do 


1 295 ' 06.00 


MlUet 


307 , 49.00 


Oats.. . . 


92,629 
1 464 

103,374 
4,549 

330,460 
4,070 

4451967 

135 
■ 460 


31.00 


Onions 


67.40^ 


Pasture 


23.86 


Peas 


Bushel.... 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 


1,895 

440,625 

2,142 

341,063 

2 

15 


19 
190 
14.2 
36.8 
20 
30 
16.66 


2.40 
.76 
1.90 
1.85 
2.80 
9.00 
27.00 


45.70 


Potatoes 


143.66 


■Rye 


27.00^ 


Wheat 


49.60 


Flaxseed 


56.00 


Sweet clover seed 




...do 


270.00 


Onion seed 


1 

1,8^ 

201 


...do 


16 


460.00 


Miscellaneous. 


::...: .:. 




Jjess duplicated acreage. . . 












XOta? «*«'^ AITArAIM 




3,044,760 


63.70 


Total cropped acre- 


56,670 












age. 






Areas. 




1 

i 


Acres. 


Far 

1, 
1, 
1, 


ms. 


Per 
oentof 
pn^ject. 


Irrigated,, no crop: 

Nonbearing orchard. . 
Young alfalfa 


624 

3,481 

4T9 


Total irrigated area farms reporte< 
Under water-right application] 




71,166 
60 296 
60,296 
66,670 


430 
420 
130 


06.8 
84.0 
96.8 


Less duphcated areas. 


i;430 


78.0 


Total Irrigated acre- 
age. 


60,206 


1 





NoTK.— Of the above, 56,670 acres counted as total cropped, 981.5 acres yielded nothing due to destruo» 
iion by predatory animals. 



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IDAHO, MINIDOKA PROJECT. 159 

Crop report, South Side pumping wm<, Minidoka project, Idaho, year 1918. 



Crop. 



Area 
(acres), 



AlAOfa 

Alfalfa seed 

Barley 

Beans 

Beets 

Clover 

Clover seed 

Com ^ 

Com fodder 

Fruits, small... 

Oardcn 

Hay 

Oats 

Onions 

Pasture 

Peas. 

Potatoes. 

Rve 

WlM»t 

Mangles 

Without yield!. 
Leas duplicated 

Total cropped acre- 41,512 



Irrigated, no crop: * 

Nonbearing orchard . .1 300 

Young clover 89 

Youngallalfa 1,500 

Ground fiall plowed . . . | 727 

Miscellaneous ' 2,000 

^ Less duplicated areas. , 1, 263 

Total irrigated acre- 1 44, 765 



Unit of 
yield. 



J 



Ton 

Bushel. 
...do... 
..do..., 

Ton 

...do.... 
Bushel. 
...do... 

Ton 

Pound. 




Bushel... 
Sack..... 

Bushel 

...do 

Ton 



Yields. 



Values. 



TntAl Average | Per unit 
^**^- per acre, of yield. 



56,684 

219 

19,249 

2,106 

24,076 

817 

6,615 

484 I 

10 i 



3.3 1 
3 

28.4 1 
21.7 ! 
10.6 
2.3 
3.5 i 
7.1 
2.5 . 
4,036.6 



$13.00 

0.60 

L40 

4.20 

10.00 

13.00 

22.00 

1.60 

10.00 

.02 



Total. 



48 
50,645 

280 1 



4 i 
34.2 . 
86.7 



15.00 
1.00 , 
1.50 i 



2,813 
332,598 I 
95! 
314,500 { 

160 I 



Total and average. 



14.8 
135.9 
4.3 
26 

8 



2.40 I 
.75 
1.90^ 
1.85 ' 
5.00 



1736,802 

2,102 

26,949 

8,845 

240,760 

10,621 

145,530 

774 

100 

727 

25,711 

720 

50,645 

390 

33,381 

6,751 

249,449 

180 

581,991 

800 



Per acre. 



$43. oa 
29.61 
39.86 
91.40 

105.41 
30.87 
78.70 
11.3S 
25.00 
80.7a 
71.22 
60.00 
34.26 

130.00 
17.24 
34.44 

101.94 

8.20 

48.15 

40.00 



2,123,318 , 



51.20 



Areas. 



Total irrigable area farms reported 
Total irrigated area farms reported 
Under water-nght application, 



Total cropped area farms reported. . 41, 512 




1 Crops destroyed by predatory animals. 
FINANOIAIi STATEMENT. 

Project haUmte sheet, Minidoka project, June SO, 1919. 

entail - 

Inventory of aaterialB and suppiies* on hand .* 

Acooants Feoelvable: 

Cnnent $138,465.38 

Thiacoraed— Constmction water-right charges unaccmed 6, 608, 888. 13 

Constractlan work oontraoted 

Qrossooistnictlonoost 6,908,883.10 

Lees oonstraotkn revenue earnings $173,801.47 

Less cost adjosments 21,157.96. 

183,810.43 



Not 

Gross opewtton and matotcnance cost 

Lea> opwatkm aad-iaaitenance revenue earnings. 



916,750.54 



$1,143. 7a 
37,676.46 



5,147,353.51 
4,711.97 



5,6M>043.88 
827,600.60 



Aoooonts payable , 28,080.18 

CoDtinvmt obUflBtiODS 6^839.69 

CoUeetkna and oontracts of spesffloamoonts for repayments to recbunatiGn fund 6,827,114.53 

MbeeltanBOUsaoonials TlTZ^, T7. 309,161.16 

Capital investment: 

Disbursement, transfers and Joint construction vouchers received 7,364,500. 06 

CoHaotion, transfers, reftmd, and Joint constraction vouchers issued 2, 711, 145. 67 

Netbivestment 4,653,444.30 



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160 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPOBT OF EEGLAMATION SERVICE. 
Feature coats to June SO, 1919, Minidoka project. 



Principal feature. 



Fiscal year 
1919. 



TotaltoJune 
30, 1919. 



ExamtDaticns and surveys . . . 

Storage: 

Jackson Lake Dam 

Jackson Lake bridge 

Deepening river channel . 



Pumping for irrii;ation: 

Five small pumping stations . 
South Side pumping station.. 



Canal system: 

Minidoka Dam 

Main North Side Canal 

Main South Side Canal 

Feeders to South Side pumping stations . 



lateral system: 
Gravity unit... 
Pimiping unit . 



Drainage system 

Power sjTStem: 

Powerhouse 

Tran3mi9sion lines . 
Substations 



Permanent improvements and lands; 

Buildings 

Potato cellars 

Roads 



Telephone system 

Operation and maintenance during construction, water-rental basis 

Operation and maintenance, added to and compounded with construction. 

Total coit of con«rtruction features 

1 ialance in plant accounts 

t' nad justed clearing aocoimts 



Oross construction cost. . 



l^ess revenues earned during construction period: 

Rental of buildings 

Rental of farming and grazing land 

Rental of irrigation water 

Contractors' freight refunds 

Other revenues unclassified 

Cooperat ion for food conservation 

Cost of tranmiission lines borne by power users . 
Profit on ho3pital operations 

Total re venue - 

Net construction cost to June 30, 1919 



$32.048 28 



31,715.34 



S128.2St.OO 



416,085.24 
33,316.89 
44,677.81 



31,715.34 



494,079.94 



29,521.47 
474,047.96 



244.00 



503,569.43 



676,575.37 

746,154.58 

329,579.88 

77,483.85 



244.00 



1,829,799.68 



1300.03 
61.43 



540,651.96 
577,332.21 



1248 50 1,117 984.16 



2,853.97 
1915.32 
7,667.47 



9,606.12 



26,861.21 



26,861.21 



74tf,42i».74 



455,317.40 
103,50&51 
79,099.78 



638,015.69 



130,784.44 

11,006«05 

1,533.87 



143,324.36 



12,313.86 



112,540.31 



28,396.01 

330,353.90 

12,313.86 



112, 54a 31 



3,269.92 

15,747.25 

12,138 93 

37. tt 

761.^ 

849.01 

19,189.30 

1 673. 75 



29,825.88 



82, 714 « 



5,975,499.86 

22,448.10 

915. 14 



.5,998,863.10 



14,485.67 

1,161.96 

146,222.00 

500.25 

10,20L50 

840.01 

19,189.30 

1,119.64 



19S»819.43 



i, 806. 048. 68 



^ Deduct. 



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IDAHO, MINIDOKA PROJECT. 
Statement of cost by calendar years, Minidoka project. 



161 



Year ending Dec. 31— 


Construction. 

S26,111.96 

83,053 65 

605,805.94 

736,028.48 

439,598.02 

367,628.31 

731,680.54 

599,919.79 

391,497.01 

307,484.76 

345,805.52 

628,437.47 

171,799.17 

89,966.66 

83,787.30 

63,603.26 

72,938.13 


Operation and maintenance. 


Total cost. 


TfmtnKcaa- 
struction. 


Under pub- 
lic notice. 


Total. 


1908 








$26,111.96 
83,053.65 
505,805.94 


1904 








1905 








1906 








736,028.48 
465,108.53 
402,907.83 
791,250.13 
705,618.28 
479,023.33 
416,974.50 
461,971.41 
759,398.36 
309,913.76 
253,047.55 
198,434.00 
162,379.97 
135,236.73 


1907 




$25,5i6.5i 
35,279.62 
37,485.35 
48,043.74 
36,515.54 
41,239.03 
46,271.39 
69,496.97 
138,114.59 
163,080.89 
114,646.70 
198,776.71 
62,298.60 


$35,510.51 
35,279.62 
59,509.58 
105,698.49 
87,526.32 
109,489.75 
116,165.89 
130,955.80 
138,114.59 
163,080.89 
114,646.70 
98,776.71 
62,298.60 


1908 




1009 


$22,084.23 
57,664.75 
51,0ia78 
68,260.72 
69,894.60 
61,458.92 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1913 


1914 


1915 


1916 




1917 




1918 




Jan. 1 to June 30, 1919 








Total 


5,645,145.96 

915.14 

22, 44a 10 


330,353.90 


916,759.54 


1,247,113.44 


6,892,259.40 
915. 14 


Unadjusted clearing accounts 

Undistributed nlant 








22,448.10 










Grand total 


5,668,509.20 


330,353.90 


916,759.54 


1,247,113.44 


6,915,622.64 







1 Actual cost $136,526.77, reduced bv transfer of $12,313.86 to (^ration and maintenance added to con- 
traction and $25,436.20 to commercial po\rcr. 

Statement of cost by fiscal years j Minidoka project. 



>4 ear coding June 30— 



1003. 
1904. 
1905. 
1906. 
1907. 
1908. 
1909. 
1910. 
1911. 
1912. 
1913. 
1914. 
1915. 
1916. 
1917. 
1918. 
1919. 



Total 

Unadjusted clearing accounts. . 
Undistributed plant 



O])eration and maintenance. 



Construction.'- 



S8, 
34, 
131, 
880, 
592, 
287, 
641, 
628, 
494, 
321. 
273, 
80'), 
186, 
69, 
99 
87, 
112, 



819.33 
525.27 
582.02 
029.87 
027.09 
168.96 
398.19 
646.68 
399.14 
014.35 
550.23 
843.45 
977.83 
122.97 
496.00 
974. 19 
540.31 



During con- Under pub- 
struction. lie notice. 



$55,847.50 
56,503.60 
65,795.47 
64,294.23 
70,305.60 
17,607.60 



$39,911.00 

44,395.26 

62,618.63 

34,011.52 

33,412.14 

40,222.57 

71,558.08 

102,871.27 

I 144,464.02 

I 127,906.80 

1 102,211.41 

« 123,176.84 



5,645,145.96 

915. 14 

22,448.10 



330,353.90 j 916,759.64 



Grand total 6,668,509.20 , 330,353.90 | 916,759.64 1,247,113.44 



Total. 



$39,911.00 
44,395.26 
108,466.13 
90,515.12 
99,207.61 
104,516.80 
141,863.68 
130,478.77 
144,464.02 
127,906.80 
102,211.41 
133,176.84 



1,247,113.44 



Total cost. 



$8,849.-33 
34,525.27 
1.31,582.02 
880,029.87 
592,027.09 
327,079.95 
6RS,793.45 
737,112.81 
'584,914.26 
420,221.96 
378,067.03 
947,707.13 
307,456.60 
303,586.90 
227,402.89 
190,185.60 
235,717.15 

6,892,259.40 

915. 14 

22,448.10 



6,915,622.64 



1 Actual cost $127,647.61, reduced by transfer of f3'>,436.20 to commercial power. 
« Actual cost $135,490.70, reduced by transfer of $12,313.86 to operation and maintenance added to con- 
struction. 

Estimated cost of contemplated worhj Minidoka project, fiscal year 1920, 



Principal features. 



Examination and surveys: North Side pumping unit 

Power system: Minor extensions and connections 

Permanent iTiprovcTients: Employees' cottages 

Operation and maintenance under public notice 

Reimbursable accounts 

Total 



Estimated 

cost during 

fi%alyear 

1920. 



$20,000 
20,000 
10,000 

170,000 
2,000 



222,000 



138554—19 ^11 



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162 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

Operating cost and revenues j Minidola project^ to Dee. Sly 1918. 

I ' ^ ' 

Calendar year 191 S. ' To end of calendar year 191H. 



Operation. ^?!SL^ Total. Operation. 



1 



Storage: 
Nort 
South Side pom] 



North Side gravity , $8,290.92 

~ ■ "depumplng 3,29S.29 

Jackson Liake, other com- ' 



.1. 



$63,28 1 $8,354.20 : $47,222.22 
30.16 



173.00 



panics \ 18,067.15 

Jackson Lake, raising and 
blanketing dylce 1 3,949.03 



Total storage system . . | 29,65 6. 36 4, 216. 47 

Pumping: | 

North Side gravlt 



3,328.45 7,899.15 

I 
18,240.15 ' 28,444.41 

3,949.03 , 



33,871.83 



83,565.78 



3,826.62 

South Side pnmpfng | 15,615.82 | 9,328.33! 24,944.15 55,987.80 

Central stations and trans- 1 i * 

ralisionlines 4,625.31 | 1,970.02 6,595.33' 30,355.13 



Totalpumping I 20,241.13 1 11,298.35 | 31,539.48, 90,169.56 



Mainte- 
nance. 



ToUl. 



$92.95 $47,315.17 
30. 16 I 7,929.31 



173.00 I 
3,949.03 I 



28,617.41 
3,949.03 



4,245.14 87,8ia93 



1,413.31 
29,514.32 

13,569.82 



44,497.45 



Canals: i 

Main Canal, North Side...! 331.95 

Main Canal, South Side...; 1,060.02 

Minidoka Dam , North Sidei 2, 978. 01 

Minidoka r)am,8outh Side | 1 , 447. U 



Total canal system 1 5,826.09 

i6,'334.'52 



Laterals: 

North Side distribution. 
South Side distribution. 



16,331.52 



Undistributed power i i22,l84.79 



Total ! 49,873.31 

Less operation and mainte- 
nance charges added to con- 
struction 



Total cost. 

KEVENt'ES. 

Operation and maintenance 
charges accrued on contracts 
with water-right applicants.!. 

Operation and maintenance I 
charges paid in advance by 
water-right applicants 

Operation and maintenance I 
ctiarges paid and forfeited by ! 
water-right applicants 

Penalties on operation and j 
maintenance charges accrued I 
on contracts with water- i 
right applicants ^ 

Rental of buildings during > 
operating period I. 

Rental of irrigation water j . 

Other revenues unclassified, 
earned during operating 
period 

Less discount allowed on 



operation and maintenance 
cnai 



charges accrued on contracts 
with water-right applicants. 



Total 

Difference, deficit. 



3^.60 

2,184.31 

261.14 

180.56 



2,960.61 



666.55 35,406.18 

3,253.33 I 7,261.80 

8,239.15: 9,382.74 

1,627.67, 2,946.87 



8,786.70 < 54,997.59 



41,910.11 



41,910.11 



832.72 



61,217.26 



58,244.63 



105,575.68 
53,491.21 



58,244.63 , 159,066.89 



» 21,352.07 , 



945.23 



111,090.57 



388,745.04 



135,680.43 I 

I 
«87.11 



70,483.06 

14,569.87 
13,070.61 
3,180.07 



101,303.61 



211,15L3S 
116,223.49 



327,374.87 



608.69 



478,029.76 



911.94 I. 

157.50 '. 
« 78,527. 20 j. 



s 12, 195. 06 I 
«2,942.08 ! 



43,048.42 ' 



68,042.15 



I 



6,239.93 
85,502.13 

43,924.96 



134,667.00 



105,889.24 
21,831.67 
22,453.35 
6,126.94 



156, SOL 20 



316,727.06 
169,714.70 



486,44L76 



1,553.02 



866,774.80 
12,313.86 



854,460.94 



766,377.58 

5.26 

2,334.92 

4,066.66 

1,184.61 
83,967.33 

30.66 
>6,]6L69 



851,784.13 



2,676.81 



1 Credit transferred to operation and maintenance commercial power system. * Deduct. 

Note.— 1918 accruals in amount of $135,680.43 were taken into the book accounts in 1919» 



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IDAHO, MINIDOKA PROJECT. 163 

JACKSON LAKE BNIiABGEMENT. 

Jackson LaTce Dam, — The crown of the dike was brought up to 
grade and to full width where undue settlement had occurred. Re- 
sloping and blanketing of the lower toe was completed. This work 
was necessitated by the raising of the -dam under contract dated 
February 25, 1913, with the Kluhn Irrigation & Canal Co. and the 
Twin Falls Canal Co. In accordance with this contract the expense 
was borne by these companies. An addition was made to the rock 
fill below the north end of the gate section to replace the fill that was 
washed out. The deepening of the river channel below the dam and 
the addition to the fisn ladder were completed. 

For complete history of this feature, see previous annual reports. 

Balance sheet, Jackson Lake Enlargement^ July 1, 1919. 
Assets: 

Gross construction cost 1782,045, 87 

Deposits, condemnation court (to 1)6 returned) 1,107.50 

^ ^ ^. . . $783,163.37 

Revenues and cart adjustments: 

Rentals of buildinpis 905. 55 

Contractors* frei;ilit refunds ] . 479.01 

Forfeiture by defaulting bidders .' . 767. 65 

Hospital loss i igg, qq 

'— 1,984.21 

^^et«»t 781,1 60.16 

Liabilities: Reserves— 

Interest received 2 066 23 

Payments by Kuhn Irrigation <Sc Canal Co 508!998.18 

Payments by Twin Falls Canal Co 186, 865. 23 

'7QA 020 A4 

Investment of the United States: ' * 

I>fsbur?»ment vouchers, roclamation fUnd $741, 636. 20 

Disbursement vouchers, increased compensation fund 8. 42 

Transfers received 109,301.34 

n u ^i V 850,945.96 

Collection vouchers 843,848. 19 

Transfers issued 12, 858. 25 

856.706.44 

Net investment 15, 760. 48 

781,109.16 
1 Deduct. 



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KOHTAHA* HUVTLET PBOJECT. 

R. H. FiFiELD, Project Manager, Huntley, Mont. 

LOCATION. 

County: Yellowstone. 

Townships: 2 and 3 N., Bs. 27- to 31 E., Montana meridian. 

Railroads: Northern Pacific; Chicago, Burlirgton A Quincy. 

Railroad stations and estimated population June 30, 1919: Himtley, 175; Osbom; * 
Worden, 150; Newton; » Pompeys JPillar, 120; Bull Mountain; » Ballantine, 150; and 
Anita,* Mont. 

WATBB BUPPLY. 

Source of water supply: Yellowstone River. 
Area of drainage basin: 12,000 souare miles. 

Annual run-off in acre-feet of Yellowstone River at Huntley (12,000 souare miles), 
1908 to 1918: Maximum, 7,391,600; minimum, 4,562,200; mean, 6,092,400. 

AGBICXTLTUBAL AND CLIMATIC CONDITIONS. 

Area for which the service is prepared to supply water, season of 1919: 31,360 acres. 
Area under water-right application, season of 1919: 27,976 acres. 
Length of irrigation season: May 1 to September 30 — 153 days. 
Average elevation ot irrigable area: 3,000 feet above sea level. 
Rainfall on irrigable area: 12 years, average 13.51 inches; 1918, 12.71 inches. 
Rarge of temperature on irrigable area: —35° to 105° F. 

Character of soil of irrigable area: Ranges from heavy clay to light sandy loam. 
Principal products: Alfalfa, oats, sugar beets, and wheat. 

Prindpal markets: Billings, Mort.; St. Paul and Minneapolis, Minn.; Denver, 
Colo. ; Kansas City, Mo. ; Seattle, Wa^. 

LANDS OPENED FOB IBBIGATION. 

Dates of public notices and orders: Mav 21, 1907; March 3, 1909; March 13, 1912; 
June 23, August 9, 1913; September 24, November 3, 1914; February 27, March 20, 
October 9, December 23, 1915; January 15, March 15, 1916; March 20, 1917; April 
4, 1918. 

Location of lands opened: Tps. 2 and 3 N., Rs. 27 to 31 E., inclwive, Montana 
meridian. 

Limit of area of farm units: 160 acres. 

Duty of water: 2i acre-feet per acre per annum at the farm. 

Buildirg charge per acre of irrigable land : First unit, entered before December 23, 
1915, public land, $30 per acre, additional charge of $4 per acre paj'tble to Indians, 
pri\'ate land, $50 per acre since December 1, 1913, additional charge of $15 per acre 
lor supplemental construction for all water-right applicants subject to the terms of 
the extension act; and all other water-right applicants who h&\e agreed to the in- 
creased charge; public land entered since December 23, 1915, $45 per acre. Second 
and third units, public land $60 per acre, additional charge of $4 per acre payable 
to Indians; private land, $60 per acre. 

Annual operation and maintenance charge: For all lands of the project, water de- 
livered between July 8 and August 31, inclusive, $1.10 per acre-foot; and for water 
deliAered prior to July 8 and subsequent to August 31, 50 cents per acre-foot; a mini- 
mum charge of $1.50 per irrigable acre, whether water is used or not, "which minimum 
charge is credited to the amount due for water furnished at above rates; water-right 
applicants in the first unit ^ho failed or refused to sign the contract for payment of 
the supplemental construction charge are required to pay an additional charge of 
$1.50 per acre of irrigable land. 

1 Less than 25 population. 
164 



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MONTANA, HUNTLEY PROJECT. 165 

CHBONOLOGICAL SX7MMABY. 

ReconnoisBance made and preliminary surveys begun in 1904. 

Construction reconmiended by board of engineers, February 26, 1905. 

Construction authorized by Secretary, April 18, 1905. 

First irrigation by Reclamation Service, season 1908. 

First unit completed in 1908. 

Second unit completed in 1915. 

Entire project £0.65 per cent completed June 30, 1919. 

IBBIGATION PLAN. 

The irrigation plan of the Hunt lev project provides for the diversion of water from 
the south side of the Yellowstone River about 2 miles above Huntley, Mont., into a 
main canal which extends down the valley about 27 miles to a point 2 miles east of 
Bull Mountain, Mont. The greater portion of the water is distributed by gravity. 
Fourteen milea below the hettd gates a 2-unit gravity pumping plant and a 2-unit 
power pumping plant are installed, and 100 second-feet of water are lifted 45 feet into 
a high-line canal. The high-line canal serves about 5,400 acres of land above the 
main canal in the vicinity of 6a Han tine, Anita, and Pompeys Pillar, Mont. The 
gravity pumpirg plant is a reinforced concrete building containirg two pumping 
units, each with a capacity of about 30 second-feet, and each comprising a turbine 
water wheel directly connected with a centrifugal pump by means of a vertical shaft. 
Three hundred and ten net horsepower are developed oy a 34-foot drop in the main 
canal. The power piunping plant is a wooden-framed building covered with gal- 
vanized iron, having a concrete foundation, containing two pumping unit£, each with 
a capacity of about 23 second-feet, and each comprising a 182-horsepower semi- Diesel 
ennne and a centrifugal pump, belt drive. 

The United States clamis all waste, seepage, unappropriated spring and perco- 
lating waters arising within the project, and proposes to use such waters in connec- 
tion therewith. 

Further operations provide for the construction of drainage canals for the relief 
and protection of project lands from seepage conditions, the replacing of all remaining 
timmr structures in the first unit with permanent type structures, installing a fire 
protection system for the Ballantine auxiliary pumping plant, rebuilding about 1 ,300 
linear feet of lateral G in order to divert water from lateral F. G. L., and the reclama- 
tion of alkaline lands by farming methods. 

SX7MMABY OF GENERAL DATA FOB HUNTLEY PROJECT TO END 
OF FISCAL YEAR 1919. 

Areas: 

Irrigable acreage when project is complete 32, 885 

Public land entered to June 30, 1919 2C, 460 

Public land open to entry on June 30, 1919 983 

Public land withdrawn on June 30, 1919 1, 525 

Private land June 30. 1919 3, 967 

Acreage service could have supplied in season of 1918 31, 360 

Estimated acreage service can supply in season 1919 31 , 360 

Estimated acreage service can supply in season 1920 31 , 360 

Acreage irrigated season of 1918 ". 19, 262 

Acreage cropped under irrigation season of 1918 19, 262 

Acreage dry farmed season of 1918 304 

Crops: 

Value of irrigated crops season of 1918 $750; 963 

Value of irrigated crops per acre cropped |39 

Finances: 

Net construction cost to June 30, 1919 $1, 737, 864. 77 

Per cent completed on June 30, 1919 90. 65 

Appropriated for fiscal year 1920 $95, 000. 00 

Estimated per cent complete bv June 30, 1920 94. 

Proposed appropriation for fipcal vear 1921 $129, 000. 00 

Estimated per cent complete by June 30, 1921 97. 

Announced construction charges per acre, $30, $45, $50. and $60. 

Appropriation fiscal year 1919 $112, 000. 00 

Increased compensation $4, 496. 24 

Increase, miscellaneous collections $17, 909. 39 

$134,4^5.63 



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166 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

Kxpenditure? rharceablo to 1919 appropriation: 

Disbureements! : $74, 100. 83 

Traii?iVr? 6, 465. 26 

Current UabiHti#« 7,039.25 

( ontiDsent liabilitios 3. 221. 20 

$90,826.54 

T'nencurabered balance July 1, 1910 43,579.09 

Ref»a> ment*^: 

Value of ooDstrurtion water rijrht eont ra< t.-* $1 , 310, 317. 24 

Con.-^tnictioy c-barue* — 

Arrrued to June 30. 1<>19 300, 948. 84 

Collet ted to June 30, 1919 296, 031 . 39 

Vnrollectc>d on June :^0. 1919 4, 917. 45 

O] deration and maintenanre charges t'l'ublic not ice "* — 

.Vccnied to June 30. 1919 > 205, 205. 54 

Collected to June nO, 1919 ' 190, 260. 96 

Uncollei'ted on June 30. 1919 ^ 14, 944. 58 

Water rental charges — 

Accrued to June I- 0. 1919 2, 631. 95 

Collected to June 30, 1919 2, 404 11 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 227. 84 

Drainapre: 

Kstiraated acreage dama^d bv seepage to June 30, 1919 U 500 

Miles of draipp built to June 3*0, 1919— 

Open 16 

Cloeed 48 

Total 64 

Intimated acreage protected by drains to June 30, 1919 20, 000 

Kstimated a<reat;e to be protected bv authoiized fvstom 24, 000 

Co«t of drainage works to June 30, 1919 .' $484,821.37 

CONSTBTTCTION DX7BING FISCAL YEAB. 

Pumping for irrigation, — ^The building for Ballantine auxiliary 
pumping plant was built and the 42-inch continuous wood-stave force 
pipe line was painted. 

Canal system, — ^Two timber checks and two wooden turnouts on 
the main canal were replaced with concrete structures under supple- 
mental construction. 

iMteral system.— On lateral F. G. L. several small structures were 
built, which completed this lateral. One hundred and four timber 
structures were replaced with permanent type structures under sup- 
plemental construction. 

Drainage system, — Owing to financial and labor conditions, only a 
small amount of drainage work w^as done; 4,792 linear feet of closed 
drain No. 22 were built. 

Farm units — Farming operations, — On the reclamation of land in 
the vicinity of Xewton, Mont., by farming methods, 38 acres of land 
were plowed and 100 acres were double disked. 

> Inriiiflps supplemental construction charges accrued, to be collected as operation and matnteaance* 

'Inc.u'le? .supplemental construction charges collected as operation and maintenance, $1,644.44. 
* In?iudes supplemental construction charges uncollected to be collected as operation and niaintenamoe» 
$622.:>3. 



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MONTANA, HUNTLEY PROJECT. 



167 



SEEPAGE AND DRAINAGE. 

For the calendar year 1918 operation and maintenance and con- 
itruction payments were suspended on 1,684 acres of land that were 
seeped or nad not been fully reclaimed from the effects of seepage. 

There were no marked clianges in seepage conditions during the 
fiscal year. 

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE. 

The irrigation season of 1918 extended from May 3 to October 1. 
The precipitation during Maj^ was about sufficient for crop growth, 
and consequently little irrigation water was used. June weather was 
exceedingly hot and dry, causing heavy irrigation. The conditions 
during Jvly, August, and September were average. 

The precipitation to June 30, in 1919, was the lightest in the his- 
tory of the project, and irrigation during May and June was verj 
heavy. 

The entire s^tem was operated both years, and there were no 
unusual breaks in the canals. During June, 1918, on account of the 
unprecedented hot weather and hot winds, and as the auxiliary 
pumping plant had not been completed, the water supply was inade- 
quate imder the pumping system, and some crops were damaged 
tnereby. 

Maintenance work was confined to repairing canal embankments 
and structiu*es, replacing timber structures with concrete, and repair- 
ing closed drains. In Jime, 1918, the headquarters buildings at 
Himtlev were moved to avoid being washed away bv high water in 
the Yellowstone River, and in the fall and winter of 1918 and 1919 
the headquarters were moved to Ballantine, Mont., which involved 
the moving of two cottages and a storehouse building from Himtley 
and the erection of an office, garage, blacksmith shop, barn, and 
water and sewerage system. 

Historical revieto, Huntley project. 



Item. 



1914 



1915 



Acreage for which service was prepared to deliver I 

water i 28,805 30,826 

Acreage Irrigated | 17,088 i 18,203 

Miles of canal operated 194 i 210 

Water diverted (acre-feet) i 55,543 52,383 

Water deUvered to land (acre-foet) I 24,429 17,634 

Per acre of land irrigated (acre-feet) i 1. 43 0.97 

• I Estimated. 



1916 


1917 


32,271 


32,271 


18,6^5 


19, 122 1 


210 


229 1 


67,873 


64,344 I 


21,123 


21,274 


1.13 


1.11 



1918 19191 



31,360 
19,262 
229 
47,982 
20,182 
1.06 



31,360 
20,000 
229 
60,000 
24,000 
1.20 



SBTTLEMENT. 

All desirable unentered pubUc land has been homesteaded and 
settlement is restricted to land transfers, filing of water-right apphca- 
tions on private land, relinquishments, and assignments. 

The sale value of land is increasing each year, and patented lands 
are selling for from $75 to $250 per acre. During thenscal year there 
were 363.5 acres of private land covered by water-right applica- 
tions; 3 homestead entries changed hands by relinquishment, 3 
entries by assignment, and 1 entry was rehnquished. 



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168 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 



Settlement data, Huntley project. 



Item. 



Total number of farms on project... . 
Number of irrii;ated farms 

Operated by owners or managers. 

Operated by tenants 

Populatfon 

Num ber of towns 

Populatfon 

Total population in towns and on farms. 

Number of public schools 

Number of churches 

Num ber of banks 

Total capital stock 

Amount of deposits 

Number of depositors 

Number of relinquishments. . 





1914 


1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 


1919 




586 

535 

432 

103 

1,700 

8 

475 

2,175 

14 

6 

3 

$60,000 

$220,000 

886 

4 


646 
530 
383 
147 
1,764 

475 

2,229 

15 

6 

3 

$60,000 

$239,000 

1,060 

2 


601 
550 
400 
150 
2,050 

468 

2,518 

8 

6 

3 

$60,000 

$307,414 

1,180 

5 


601 
553 
368 
185 
1,880 

610 

$85,000 

$498,000 

1,375 

5 


601 
561 
350 
202 

2,107 

8 

500 

2,706 

6 

$85,000 
$540,434 


601 




540 




315 
234 




2,000 






509 




2.m 




g 




4 




$85,000 




$560,000 
1 400 






1 







PRINCIPAL CROPS. 

The early spring of 1918, with sufficient moisture, made it possible 
to secure an excellent seed bed. All crops that were planted early 
came on rapidly under very favorable conditions. The acreage 
planted to sugar beets was comparatively small, due to the increase 
m price of grain and the prospective labor shortage. In July a 
destructive webworm did a great deal of damage to this crop, 
materially reducing the acreage yield. There was a large increase 
in the wheat acreage over previous years. The principal crops 
raised were alfalfa, 6,766 acres; sugar beets, 1,963 acres; oats, 2,006 
acres; wheat, 6,306 acres. A hailstorm on June 18 did some damage 
to grain crops under the pumping system. 

The weather conditions to June 30, 1919, were not favorable to 
crops other than alfalfa. The extremely hot and dry weather made 
it necesssary to irrigate up most of the grain crops, and in many 
instances poor stands were obtained. The alfalfa crop was unusually 
good; the first cutting was harvested and the second growth well 
advanced at the end of the fiscal year. 



( 


Jrop report, Hunt 

i 
Area. Unit of 
(acres). yield. 

6,766 Ton 

48 Bushel.... 
75 'do 


ley project 


, Montana, 1918. 




Yields. 






Values. 


Crop. 


Total. 


Average 
per acre. 


Per unit 
of yield. 


Total. 

$206,712 

2,170 

1,853 

4,320 

162,990 

670 

1,400 

$,958 

6,381 

280 

15,770 

1,660 

57,899 

10,588 

6.616 

268,616 


Per acre. 


Alfalfa 


17, 234 2, /w 


$11.99 
12.20 
.98 
4.52 
10.00 
10.00 
12.06 
11.20 
1.25 
4.00 


$30.57 


Alfalfa seed 


178 
1,883 

955.33 
16,299 
67 

123.5 
353.5 
4,263 
70 


3.67 

25.11 

7.47 

8.30 

2.73 

2.74 

1.58 

21.20 

20.00 


44.75 


Bar.ev 


24.71 


Beans 


128 

1,9€3 

24 

45 

224 

203 

3 

109 

108 

2,006 

1,091 

73 

6,306 


...do 

Ton 

...do 

...do 

Bushel.... 

...do 

...do 


33.80 


Beets, sugar 


83.00 


Cane 


27.34 


Clover hay 


33.11 


Clover seed 


17. 6S 


Com 


26.50 


Millet 


80.00 


Garden 


79.30 


Hay (other than listed). . . 
Oats 


Ton 

Bushel.... 


i38.86 
73,079.60 


1.29 
36.43 


11.90 
.79 


13.27 
2^86 


Pasture 


9.70 


Potatoes 


Bushel.... 
...do 

Total 


9.611.6 
138,305 


132.12 
21.93 


.09 
1.94 


90.0$ 


Wheat 


42.60 


Total Irrigated and 
cropped 


19,262 


AnrI fLVf»m.pe 




750,963 


39.00 













Areas. 




Acres. 


Farms. 


Per 

cent of 
project. 




Totol irrigab'e area farn 

Total irrigated area farr 

Under water-right a 

Under rental contra 

Total cropped are& farm 


as reported 
ns reportec 
pp ication 
kCtS 




1 


25,182 
18,958 
18,791 
167 
10.262 


549 

549 

549 

7 


76 
57 
57 
57 




IS reported 






f» 












' 





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MOirrANA^ HTJNTLEY PROJECT. 169 

FINANCIAL STATBMBNT. 

Condensed balance sheet, Huntley project^ June SO, 1919, 

Cash $238.09 

Inventory of materials and supplies on hand 37,199.60 

Current accounts receivable 21,570.72 

Fixed accounts receivable— (Construction water-right charges unaccrued 1, 007, 101. 43 

Construction work contracted 3,621.20 

Gross construction cost $1,750,942.62 

Less constructijn revenue earnings 13,077.85 

Net construction cost 1,737,864.77 

Cross operation and maintenance cost 343,708.08 

Less operation and maintenance revenue earnings 8, 528. 73 

Ket opOTation and maintenance cost 335, 180. 25 

Accounts payab'e , 7,C82.17 

Contineent obiigations 3.857.26 

CoUaotions and oontraots for repayments of reclamation fund 1,525.3^05 

M isceilaneous accruals 55, 700. 98 

Capital investment: 

Disbursement and transfer vouchers received 2, 322, 584. 94 

Less collection, transfer, and refund vouchers issued 771, 833. 28 

:'et investment 1,550,7,51.66 

Feature costs of Huntley project. 



Principal features. 



Examination and surveys 

Pumping for irrigation: 

Gravity pumping plant 

Bailantine auxiliary pumping plant. 

Subtotal 



Canal system 

Lateral system 

Braiuage system 

Flood protection 

Farm units, experimental station 

Permanent improvements 

Telephone system 

Operation and maintenance charges transferred to construction charges.. 

Total cost of construction features 

Balance in plant account 

Unad j usted c.earing accounts 



Gross construction cost, June 30, 1919., 



Less revenues earned during construction period: 

Rentals of buildings 

Rentals of graxing and farm lands 

Rentals of telephone and tolls 

Contractor's freight refunds 

Other revenues unclassified 

Profit on hospital operations 



Total revenues 

Net construction cost, June 30, 1919 . 




$17,375.40 



17,375.40 



4,027.13 
11,447.66 
12,016.21 



1336.50 
■*V86.'92 



44,448.98 



87.70 



87.70 



41,361.28 



Total to 
June 30. 1919. 



$10,001.00 



2,311.02 
66,703.98 



69.015.00 



715,356.80 

400,622.94 

4S8,fl4a96 

3,731.03 

1.751.99 

17,999.63 

9,112.34 

1,533.49 



1,727,965.33 

21,210.47 

1,766 82 



1,750,942.62 



31&«0 
1,100.60 

406.79 
7,633 45 

212.00 
3,409.92 



13,077.85 



1,737,864.77 



» Deducts. 



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170 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 
Statement ojcott by calendar yean^ Huntley project. 



Construction, 



Operatian 
and main- ! 
tenanoe ! 

under 

puMic 

notice. 



Year ending Dec. 31- 

1934 

1905 

19r» 



1937 

1938 

1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 

1913 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

Jan. Ito June 30, 1919 

Total 

Plant accounts 

Unadjusted clearing accounts. 



Total cost. 



52, 
v<a, 

403, 
35, 
22, 

18, 

^» 
125, 
123, 
13S, 
135, 
114, 
107, 



393.91 

273.57 ' 

388.54 ' 

341.52 

304. 16 , 

502.28 

889.90 

046.58 

979.24 

023. fO ' 

078.35 , 

370.33 

772.14 

428.90 

443.87 

728.44 , 



113, 
29, 
23, 
32, 
29, 
25, 

?' 
21, 
25, 
32, 
34, 
30, 



062.17 
005.64 
831.19 
1 

838.83 
125.92 I 
734.61 
582.49 I 
792,11 
053.42 
686.95 
205.68 



Total cost. 



S2. 
52, 
353, 
403, 
48, 
61, 
42, 
56, 
155, 
148, 
166, 
156, 
140, 
139, 
96, 
39, 



393.91 
273.57 
388.54 
341.52 
366.33 
507.92 
721.09 
346.29 
818.07 
149.52 
812.96 
952.82 
5f4.25 
482.33 
130.82 
934.12 



1,727,965.33 , 326,218.72 2,054,184.05 

21,210.47 17,049.89 38,aro.36 

1,766.82. 440.37 2,207.19 



1,750,942.62 j 343,706.98 3,094,651.60 



Statement of cost by fiscal years ^ Huntley project. 



Year ending June 30— 
1905 

1905 

1907 

19)8 

1933 , 

1910 

1911 

1912 

1913 

1914 

1915 , 

19115 

1917 

1918 

1919 



Tot^ 

Plant accounts 

Unadjusted clearing accounts. 



Totalcost 1,750,942.62 ; 343,708.98 



Consiruction. 



$30,272.90 ; 
92,908.30 I 
480,052.11 ! 
202,084.40 I 
53,393.50 
24,0o0.36 
10,028.37 
87,337.62 , 
8<i,t)14.70 
132,166.57 ' 
122,995.27 
lt<3,iK**9.06 
100,808.23 
90,514.87 1 
44,448.98 , 



Oporation 
and main- 1 

tenanoe 

under 

public 

notice. 



$4,397.67 I 
20,381.13 
18,244.69 
36,650.72 
31,242.79 , 
24,443.26 
30,233.07 ' 
2.i,057.05 ; 
28,802.56 I 
22,086.10 
38,886.79 
44,792.99 



1,727,965.33 I 326,218.72 

21,210.47 17,049.89 

1,766.82! 440.37 



Total cost. 



$30,272.90 
92,908.30 
486,052.11 
306,481.97 
73,774.63 
42,895.05 
46,679.09 
118,580.41 
111,058.02 
162,399.64 
149,052.32 
192,491.63 
122,894.36 
129,401.66 
89,241.97 



2,054,184.05 

38,260.36 

2,307.19 



2, 094, 651. 6C 



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MONTANA, HUNTLEY PROJECT. 171 

Estimated cost of contemplated work^ Huntley project^ during fiscal year 1920. 



Feature. 



Sub- 
feature. 



Pimping system: Fire protection. 

Canal system 

Lateral system: 

Construction 

Payment damage claims 



Drainage system 

Farm units 

Operation and maintenSnce under public notice.. 
Reimbursable accounts 



115,500 
1,500 



Total. 



Principal 
feature. 



$500 
2,000 



17,000 
16,000 
3,000 
30,000 
500 

69,000 



Operating cost and revenues, Huntley project , to Dec, 31, 1918. 





Cal 

Opera- 
tion. 

M34.25 


endar year 

Main- 
tenance. 

$948. 40 


1918. 
Total. 

$1,382.65 


To end of calendar year 191S. 

1 


CO.ST8. 

Pumping for irrigation 


$1,848.97 


Sfi AM. 0.5 


$8, 283. \r2 








Canal and lateral systems: 

First unit 


4, 122. 38 


14.010.48 


18, 132. 86 
7,21.5.48 
3,641.95 


49,877.85 
2,013.22 
1, 171. 18 


200,15.3.82 
11,432.21 


250,031.67 


Second unit 


900.81 1 6,314.67 
636.42 3,005.53 


i?t fin^An 


Third unit 


5,094.30, 6.265.48 






Subtotal 


$5,659.61 23. .^^.fW 


28,990.29 

2,337.71 
2, 018. 16 


53,062.26 


216,740.33 . 269.802.58 

5,404.15, 5,404.15 
14 n7K..5fi . 14 i.5fi. sn 


Maintenance permanent improve- 
ments, all units 




2,337.71 
2,018.16 


Drainage system 




78.24 










Less unpaid operation and main- 
tenance charges added to con- 
struction 


6,093.86 


28, 634. 95 


34,728.81 
41.86 


54,989.46 242,657.99 


297,647.45 
1,572.65 










Total cost 


6,093.86 


28,634.95 


34, 686. 95 


<U Qft0.4A 94*2 Aft7.00 I 9QA 074.00 






REVENUES. 

Operation and maintenance charges 
accrued on contracts with water- 
right app icants 






32,723.47 

309.30 

1,112.39 

477.14 
702.08 
667.34 






203,9«9.77 
1,254.47 
3,290.84 


Operation and maintenance charges 
paid in advance by water-right 
app'icants 










Operation and maintenance charges 
paid and forfeited by water-right 
app'icants 










Penalties on operation and main- 
tenance charges accrued on con- 
tracts with water-right appli- 
(nnts 










1.596.87 
6,763.64 
1,445.30 


Rental of buildings during operat- 
init perl'"d 










Rental of iiri^atirn water during 
operating peri( d 










Rental of telephone and tolls dur- 
ing operating peri'd 










2.36 


Other revenues, unclassified, earned 
daring operating period 






9.85 
» 694. 16 






228.14 


Less discount allowed on operation 
and maintenance charges accrued 
on contracts with water-right 
applicants 






i 


11,909.30 










Total revenues 






35,307.41 


1 


215,640.48 










Di/Terence, deficit 






s 620. 46 


! 1 


80,434.43 








1 





» Deduct. 



« Surplus. 



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XOHTAHA, MILK SIVEB PBOJECT. 

G. E. Stratton, project manager, Malta, Mont. 

R. M. Snell, project manage, St. Mary storage unit, Browning. Mont. 

LOCATION. 

Counties: Teton, Glacier, Hill, Blaine, Phillips, and Valley. 

Townships: 34 to 37 N., R. 14 W.; 34 N., R. 15 W.: 37 N., Rs! 11 to 13 W.; 33 to 
37 N., Rs. 10 to 13 E.; 27 to 33 N., Rs. 17 to 42 E., Montana meridian. 

Railroads: Great Northern and Canadian Pacific. 

RaOroad stations and estimated population June 30, 1919: Browning, 700; Ha\Te, 
6,000; Chinook, 1,500; Zurich, 50; Harlem, 700; Savoy, 80; Coburg, 80; Dodwn, 400 
Wagner, 50; Malta, 1,500; Bowdoin, 500: Saco, 500: Beverton, 50; Hinsdale, 500 
Gla^w, 2,500; and Nashua, Mont., 400; Cardston and Woolford, Canada. 

WATER STTPPLY. 

Source of water supply: St. Mary Lakes, Swiftcurrent Creek, and Milk River. 

Area of drainage basin: St. Mary I^kes and Swiftcurrent Creek, 298 square miles; 
Milk River at Ha\Te, 5,550 square miles: Milk River at Malta, 11,850 square miles; 
Milk River at Hinsdale, 20,150 square miles. 

Annual run-off in acre-feet of St. Mary River (including Swiftcurrent Creek): At 
Babb (298 square miles), 1902-1918— maximum, 830,000: minimum, 495,200; mean, 
561,300. At international line (452 square miles^ 1903-1917— maximum, 1,107.300, 
minimum, 514,100: mean, 721,000. Of Milk River: At HaNTe (5,550 square miles); 
1898-1918— maximum, 426,000; minimum, 17,100: mean, 205,000. At Malta (11,850 
square miles), 1903-1918— maximum, 712,800: minunum, 29,400; mean, 321,500. At 
Vandalia Dam (station formerly at Hinsdale, 6 miles upstream) (20,150 square 
miles), 1908-1918— maximum, 1,210,000: minimum, 140,300; mean, 545,600. 

AGBICTJLTTJBAL AND CLIMATIC CONDITIONS. 

Area for which the service is prepared to supply water, season 1919: 58,900 acres. 

Area under rental contracts, season 1919 (to June 30): 24,842 acree. 

I^ength of irrigation season: From April 16 to September 30, 170 days. 

Average elevation of St. Mary storage: 5,500 feet above sea level. 

Average elevation of irrigable area: 2,200 feet above sea level. 

Rainfall on St. Mary storage: About 24 inches, average. 

Rainfall on irrigable area: At Havre, 38 years, average 13.86 inches; 1918, 10.04 
inches; at Malta, 13 years, average 12.98 inches: 1918, 9.2 inches. 

Range of temperature on irrigable area, —56° to 107°. 

Character of soil of irrigable area: Sandy loam, clayey loam, and some gumbo. 

Principal products: AU&lfa, native blue joint hay, and other forage crops, grain, and 
vegetables. 

Principal markets: Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minn., Great Falls, Mont., and local. 

LANDS OPENED FOB IBBIGATION. 

No lands have been opened for irrigation by public notice. 
CHBONOLOOICAL SXTXMABY. 

Reconnoissance and preliminary surveys begun by the Reclamation Service in 1902. 

Construction conditionally authorized by Secret^' March 14, 1903. 

Construction of St. Mary storage unit authorized by Secretary March 25, 1905. 

Construction begun July 27, 1906. 

Dodson diversion dam completed in January, 1910. 

Treaty with Great Britain relating to distribution between Canada and the United 
States of the waters of St. Mar>' and Milk Rivers signed January 11, 1909, and pro- 
claimed May 13, 1910. 

172 



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MONTANA, MILK KIVER PROJECT. 173 

Water delivered for irrigation in 1911. 

Recommendations covering construction of the project approved by Secretar\' 
June 13, 1912. *- ri- ^ ^ 

Dodson North Canal completed in 1914. 
Sherburne Lake Reeeryou- begun June 29, 1914. 

VandaUa diversion, Vandalia South, and Dodson South Canab completed in 1915. 
Nelson Reservoir, first development completed 1915. 
Nelson Reservoir South Canal begun 1915. 

First water diverted from St. Mary River to North Fork of Milk River in 1916. 
Bowdoin Canal b^^un 1915; first imit completed 1917. 

First unit of Nelson Reservoir South Canal lateral system completed and water 
from Nelson Reservoir delivered for irrigation, 1918. 
Milk River unit 44 per cent completed June 30, 1919. 
St. Mary storage umt 78 per cent completed June 30, 1919. 

IBBIGATION PLAN. 

The irrigation plan of the Milk River project provides for the storage of water in 
the Sherburne Lakes and the St. Mary I^kes, and its diversion through a canal 28.9 
miles long, heading three-fourths of a mile below St. Mar\' Reservoir and discharging 
into the North Fork of Milk River, thence flowing through Canada for 216 miles and 
returning to the United States; the storage of water in Nelson Reservoir south of 
Milk River and 14 miles northeast of Malta; the dischs^e of stored water into Milk 
River as -required; the diversion of water from Milk River by a dam near Chinook 
into two canals, one on each side of the river, for the irrigation of lands near Chinook 
and Harlem, comprising the Chinook division; the diversion of water from Milk 
River bv a dam near Dodson into two canals, the northside canal irrigating lands 
near Dodson, Wagner, and Malta, and the southside canal conveying water to Nelson 
Ree^oir and irrigating lands near Wagner, Malta, Bowdoin, and Ashfield: the 
irrigation of lands on the south side of Milk River and Beaver Creek in the vicinity 
of Saco and Hinsdale from the stored waters of Nelson Reservoir, comprising the 
Malta division; and in the Gla£p)w division the diversion of water at Vai^alia Dam 
into a canal on the south side of Milk River for the irrii^tion of lands near Tampico, 
Glasgow, and Nashua. In case the normal flow of Milk River at Vandalia Dam is 
not suflScient for the irrigation of lands in the Glasgow di\TfiiDn, the stored waters 
in Nelson Reservoir will be returned to Milk River and diverted again at Vandalia 
Dam. The United States claims all waste, seepage, spring, and percolating water 
arising within the project, and proposes to use such water in connection therewith. 

The features of the above iirigation plan which have been completed are: 28.9 
milee of the St. Mary Canal, except the second pipe line across St. Mary River and 
Hallfi Coulee, and the second barrel of the steel flume across Spider Lake Coulee; 
Vandalia diversion dam, including the automatic movable crest gates and Dodson 
diveraion dam. including the movable crest; headworks for the Dodson North, Dodson 
South, and Vandalia South Canals; 10 miles of the Dodson South Canal, with a capac- 
ity of 900 second-feet, including Point of Rocks equalizing reservoir, 34 miles, with 
a capacity of 500 second-feet, and the lateral and waste-water systems to cover 15,000 
acres; 28 miles of Dodson North Canal, with a capacity of 200 second-feet at its head, 
including the lateral and waste-water systems for 12,000 acres: 46 miles of Vandalia 
South Canal, with a capacity of 300 second-feet at its head, including the lateral and 
waste-water systems for 19,300 acres; 18 miles of Bowdoin Canal, with a capacity of 
175 second-feet at its head, including lateral and waste- water systems for 8,(KX) acres; 
Nelson Reservoir South Main Canal with a capacity of 250 second-feet at its head; 
the first development of Nelson Reservoir to store 2 ),0,10 acre-feet; and the first unit 
of the Nelson Reservoir South Canal lateral svstem to cover 10,000 acres. 

Work under construction consists of building two piers in Dodson Dam, together 
with the installation of movable crest gates and service bridge on this dam; the ex- 
tension of lateral system, including structures, under the Nelson Re=^ervoir South Canal 
system; the building of telephone lines from Nelson Reservoir to Beaverton and from 
Paisley to Willow Creek; other minor extensions of lateral systems; and Sherburne 
Lakes Reservoir Dam. 

The principal features remaining to be completed are: Chinook Division, com- 
prising the diversion dam and the North and South Canals: Nelson Reservoir to its 
final development; Chain Lakes Reservoir; Beaver Creek Reservoir and Canals: the 
second units of Bowdoin and Nelson Reservoir South Canal systems; the extension 
of Vandalia south canal and lateral svstem; St. Mary Lake and Sherburne Reser- 
voirs; the second pipe line across St. Mary River and Halls Coulee crossing; and the 
second barrel of tne steel flimie across Spider Lake Coulee. 



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174 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL, REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

STTMMABT OF GENEBAL DATA FOR MILK BIVEB PBOJECT TO END 
OF FISCAL YEAB 1919. 

(Exclusive of St. Mary storage unit.) 
Areas: 

Irrigable acreage when project is complete 181, 000 

Public land entered to June 30, 1919 37, 948 

Public land withdrawn on June 30, 1919 22, 829 

State land unsold, June 30, 1919 6,055 

Indian land 28,000 

Private land, June 30, 1919 86, 168 

Acreage service could have supplied in season of 1918 58, 000 

Estimated acreage service can supply in season of 1919 58, 900 

Estimated acreage service can supply in season of 1920 60. 000 

Acreage irrigated season of 1918 24, 843 

Acreage cropped under irrigation season of 1918 23, 800 

Acreage dry farmed season of 1918 3, 119 



Crops: 

Value of irrigated crops, season of 1918 $408, 716. 00 

Value of irrigated crops per acre cropped $17. 17 

Value of dry-farmed crops, season of 1918 $21, 619. 00 

Value of dry-farmed crops, per acre cropped $6. 93 

Finances: 

Net construction cost to June 30, 1919 $3, 307, 187. 32 

Per cent completed on June 30, 1919 46 

Appropriated for fiscal year 1920 $128, 000. 00 

Estimated per cent complete by June 30, 1920 48 

Proposed appropriation for fiscal year 1921 $552, 000 

Estmiated per cent complete by June 30, 1921 53 

Appropriation fiscal y;ear 1919 $112, 000. 00 

Balance 1918 appropriation 6, 512. 09 

Increased compensation 5, 728. 26 

Special appropriation 1, 026. 61 

Increase miscellaneous collections 45, 088. 37 

— — — — ^-^-^— 1 70 'ifi^ "m 

Expenditures chargeable to 1919 appropriation: * 

Disbursements 125, 690. 65 

Transfers 12, 061. 35 

Current liabilities 9, 356. 37 

Contingent liabilities 3, 623. 55 

150, 731. 92 

Unincumbered balance on July 1, 1919 19, 623. 41 

Water rental charges: 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 46, 157. 71 

Collected to June 30, 1919 45, 576. 76 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 580. 95 

Drainage : 

Estimated acreage damaged by seepage to June 30, 1919 1, 500 

ST. MARY STORAGE UNIT. 

Finances: 

Net construction cost to June 30, 1919 $2, 541, 461 . 60 

Per cent completed on June 30, 1919 78 

Appropriated for fiscal year 1920 , .- $106,000.00 

Estimated per cent complete by June 30, 1920 81 

Proposed appropriation for fiscal year 1921 $175, 000. 00 

Estimated per cent complete by June 30, 1921 87 

Appropriation fiscal year 1919 $74,000.00 

Increased compensation 4^ 185. 40 

Increase miscellaneous collections 12. 671. 91 

Special appropriation 604. 73 

Unexpended balance previous appropriation 9, 403. 41 

$100, 865. 45 



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MONTANA, MILK RIVER PROJECT. 175 

Expenditures chargeable to 1919 appropriation: 

Disbureements $90, 001. 63 

Transfers 7, 172. 92 

Current liabilities 2, 515. 92 

Contingent liabilities 319. 49 

$100, 009. 96 

Unincumbered balance on July 1, 1919 855. 49 

CONSTBTJCTION DUBING FISCAL YEAR. 
MILK RIVER PROJECT DISTRIBUTION UNITS. 

OhinooJc division, — No work was in process. 

Malta division. — ^At Dodson diversion dam piers were constructed 
for a three-span service bridge, which was erected, and permanent 
movable crest gates, together with the necessary operating machinery, 
were attached thereto. 

On Dodson North and South Canal several checks were added. A 
river cut-off, at Point of Rocks, mile 8, was constructed in an attempt 
to reduce saturation of the embankment adjacent to the Point of 
Rocks flume. On the lateral system additional metal culverts, 
wooden turnouts and checks, and measuring devices were placed. 

On Nelson Reservoir South Canal system a concrete siphon was 
built on the NS-25 lateral, also wooden drops and other small struc- 
tures. NS-1 16-17 was extended by contract, and NS-102 and 
NS-116 by Government forces. 

Glasgow division, — ^At Vandalia diversion dam 500 cubic yards of 
rock paving were placed for protection of south bank below the dam. 

On Vandalia South Canal considerable work was done raising the 
main canal and lateral banks, and a few wooden checks, turnouts, 
and measuring devices were built. 

ST. MARY STORAGE UNIT. 

Sherburne LaJces Dam, — During the fall of 1918 work was contin- 
ued by Government forces. No construction work was done during 
the spring of 1919 on account of shortage of funds. When work was 
suspended the dam, with the exception of the spillwajr and spillway 
channel, had been completed except for a small section in the parapet 
wall left out for a roadway, a small amount of paving close to the 
parapet wall, and a small amount of earth and gravel ml back of the 
parapet wall. No attempt was made to complete the spillway crest 
or spillway channel on account of the slide of the north hillside adja- 
cent to this structure. 

SBEPAGE AND DRAINAGE. 

Seepage is showing on some of the lands adjacent to Nelson Reser- 
voir aoout 8 miles west of Saco, on lands under the Dodson South 
Canal between mile 13 and mile 19 between Wagner and Alkali 
Creek, also imder the Dodson South Canal at about mile 33, near 
Strater, and under the Vandalia South Canal at about mile 30. 
These areas will doubtless require drainage at some future time and 
data are being collected upon which drainage systems wiU be designed. 
Surface waste water ditches are already constructed to tap practically 
each farm. 



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176 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL BEPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 
OPBBATION AND MAINTENANCE. 

From July 1, 1918, to the end of the operating season the delivery 
of water on a rental basis was in progress under the Dodson North, 
Dodson South, Nelson Reservoir Soutn, and Vandalia South Canals. 
A severe storm occurred in the vicinity of Glasgow on August 15, 
which did considerable damage to the Vandalia South CanS; how- 
ever, the storm also furnished sufficient moisture to tide crops over 
without serious inconvenience imtil repairs were made in this canal. 

Dxmng 1919 all the above-mentioned canals were also operated 
for delivering water on a water-rental basis. The maximimi diversion 
at Dodson Dam was 467 second-feet on May 18, 1919, and at Van- 
dalia Dam 110 second-feet on June 11, 1919. The natural supply 
of the Milk River was augmented throughout the period covered by 
this report by a supplemental supply from the St. Mary River, 
delivered through the St. Mary Canal. The Dodson South Canal 
was put into operation on April 3, 1919, for the purpose of delivering 
storage water to Nelson Reservoir, and the other canals were put 
into operation as required for deUvery of water to irrigable lands. 

Nelson Reservoir was filled to capacity in September, 1918, and 
again in May, 1919. No water was drawn from Nelson Reservoir 
for rediversion at VandaUa Dam during the season of 1918, but 
beginnii^ Jime 10, 1919, it became necessary to supplement the 
natural flow at Vandalia Dam by stored water from Nelson Reservoir. 

In addition to the operation mentioned above, St. Mary supple- 
mental water was delivered to the private canal companies on 
Chinook division at the headgates of the following canals: Fort 
Belknap Canal & Irrigation Co., New Harlem Irrigation Co., and 
Paradise Valley Ditch & Irrigation Co. It was found that the 
diversion of the Fort Belknap Indian Agency Canal, which has a 
right onlv to the natural flow of the Milk Kivor, was encroaching on 
the supplemental supply of St. Mary water and it became necessarv 
to request the Indian authorities to decrease their diversion, which 
request was promptly complied with. 

The water-rental rates were as follows: On Chinook division, in 
1918, 50 cents per acre-foot for water delivered to the headworks of 
the private canal companies; on the Malta and Glasgow divisions, 
$1 per acre-foot for water delivered on or before June 20, 1918, and 
$1.50 per acre-foot for water delivered after that date; in 1919, 
on Chinook division, 50 cents per acre-foot for water delivered to the 
headworks of the private canal companies; on Malta and GlasMw 
divisions, for water delivered to obligated lands and lands subscnoed 
to the Lower Milk River Water Users' Association, $1.50 per acre-foot 
for water delivered to the land on or before June 20, 1919, and $2 
per acre-foot for water delivered after that date; for other lands, 
$2 per acre-foot for water delivered on or before June 20, 1919, and 
$2.75 per acre-foot for water delivered after that date. 

Maintenance work was carried on throughout the open season 
although the greater part was done after the operating season in the 
fall and prior to the operating season in the spring. This largely 
comprised cleaning laterals of silt and vegetation and the repair of 
various structures. Some of the larger items were repairs to People's 
Creek Dyke, repairs of earthwork of the Vandalia South Canal caused 
by the August storm, and repairs to sluice gates on Vandalia Dam. 



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MONTANA, MILK EIVER PROJECT. 



177 



St. Mary Canal. — ^During the season of 1918, the St. Marv Canal 
was operated constantly from May 31 until September 7. A maxi- 
mum nead of 405 second-feet was carried and a total of 56,380 acre- 
feet were delivered to the North Fork of the Milk River. No serious 
operation difficulties occurred but a small maintenance crew was 
employed throughout the season raising canal banks, removing slide 
matenal from the canal section, pudolin^ canal banks to prevent 
excessive leakage, and draining canal banks to prevent sliding. 

Historical review f Milk River project. 



Item. 



Acreage for which service was prepared to 

supply water , 

Acreage irrigated , 

Miles of canal operated 

Water diverted (acre-feet) , 

Water delivered to land (acre-feet) 

Per acre of land irrigated (acre-feet) 



1914 


1915 


13.440 


40,000 


2,201 


4,102 


53 


86 


4,229 


13,041 


1,7«0 


2.884 


0.80 


0.09 



1910 


1917 


40,400 


45,000 


5,518 


11,068 


184 


204 


« 61,534 


68,503 


8,700 


11,195 


0.67 


1.01 



1918 


19191 


58,000 


58.900 


24,843 


26,000 


275 


330 


• 74,924 


78.000 


16.900 


24.000 


0.68 


0.90 



1 Estimated. 

s 33,040 acre-feet of water diverted delivered for storage in Nelson Reservoir. 

• Includes water for Nelson Reservoir. 

SETTLBICENT. 

The project has not been formally opened, and consequently no 
lands are now subject to entry. There nave been some transfers of 
deeded lands and in these transfers some breaking up into smaller 
units was accomplished. 

Three Government town sites have been opened on the project, one 
at Vandalia on July 1, 1916. but no lots have been sold: one at Zurich 
on June 23, 1917, when 41 lots were sold, 19 of which have been can- 
celed for failure to make payments; one at Bowdoin on December 1 
and 3, 1917, when 132 lots were sold on the days of sale and 175 lots 
to June 30, 1919. 

Settlement data of irrigated district, Milk River project. 



Item. 



Total number of farms on project i 

Populati(m> 

Nmnber of irrigated farms! 

Operated by owners or managers ^., 

Operaited by tenants 1 

Popolationi 

Number of towns 1 

Population 1 

Total population on farms and in towns ^ 

Number of public schools 1 

Number of churches 1 

Number of banks 1 

Total capital stock 

Amount of deposits 

Number of depositors 



1915 


1916 


1917 
192 


1918 
217 


101 


156 


210 


430 


580 


688 


48 


64 


112 


184 


29 


37 


77 


140 


19 


27 


35 


44 


140 


193 


404 


600 


3 


5 


6 


9 


1,400 


4,500 


5,000 


6,000 


1,670 


4,930 


5,580 


6,688 


6 


14 


14 


18 


6 


14 


15 


18 


3 


7 


10 


15 


$95,000 


$252,000 


$375,000 


$525,000 


1600,000 


$1,950,000 


$3,238,000 


$3,219,000 


1,800 


6,615 


9,156 


11,640 



1919 



S240 

«720 

<240 

S200 

«40 

«700 

10 

7,080 

7,750 

20 

18 

•23 

•$780,000 

I $5,279,730 

•17,600 



* Exclusive of Chinook and St. Mary's divisions, 
s Estimated. 



• Including Chinook division. 



PBINCIPAL CROPS. 



On the Malta and Glasgow divisions grain occupied 35 per cent, 
alfalfa 11 per cent, other forage crops 52 per cent, and miscellaneous 
crops 2 per cent of the area cropped imder irrigation in 1918. 

138564—19 12 



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178 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL BEPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

Crop report of irrigated kmds. Milk River project, Montana, year of 1918} 
(ExcluslTe of Chinook dlTlsIon.) 



Irrigated crop. 


Area 

(acres). 


Alfolfa 


2.m 


Alfelfasced 


Barlev 


2ffl 


Com flint 


50 


Corn fodder 


18 



Unit Of 
yield. 



Flax., 
fiarcen... 

Hay« 

Oals 

Pasture.., 
Potatoes.. 

Rye 

Wheat... . 



Total cropped acreage. 23,800 



30 ; 
11,432 I 
1,374 i 
2,105 

67 , 

ao 

4,068 



Tdn.... 

Bushel 

...do.... 
...do.... 

Ton 

Bushel. 



Ton.... 
Bushel.... 



Bushel... 

...do 

...do 



Yields. 



Total. 



5,843 
10 

4,225 
808 
83 

1,288 



6,293 
28,463 



7,062 

490 

44,879 



Average 
per acre. 



2.2 

lao 

13.8 

15.2 

1.9 

2.1 



a6 
20.7 



105.0 
15.6 
9.0 



Total and average. 



Values. 



Per unit 
of yield. 



118.00 
15.00 
.65 
1.50 
15.00 
3.20 



Total. 



24.00 I 



1.20 
1.80 
L93 



1105,174 

150 

2,746 

1,347 

495 

4,121 

3,082 

151,032 

18,501 

26,340 

8,474 

637 

86,617 



408,716 



Peracn. 



139.00 

150.00 
8.94 
22.84 
2&28 
6.61 

104.47 
13.21 
13.47 
12.00 

125.54 
21.23 
17.43 



Irri^ted, no crop: 
'ew alfalfa. 



Less duplicated areas. .' 

Total irrigated acreage. 



1,211 
168 



24,843 



Areas. 



Irrigable area farms reported 

Irrigated area farms reported: Un- 
der rental contracts 

Cropped area farms reported: 
Irrigated 



^' 


~ ^ " " 


Acres. 


Farms. 


35,758 


184 


24,843 


184 


23,800 


184 



17.17 



Percent 

of 
project. 



19.7 
13.2 
13.3 



1 108 farms more than 50 per cent irrigated; 76 farms less than 50 per cent Irrigated. 
* ICative blue Joint liay, 9/ per cent; grain hay, 3 per cent. 

Crop report of lands, dry farmed, Milk River project, Montana, year of 1918} 
(Exclusive of Chinook division.) 





Area 

(acres). 


Unit of 
yield. 

Ton 

Bushel 

Ton 

Bushel.... 


Yields. 




Values. 




Crop. 


Total. 


Averafe 
per acre. 


Perunit 
of yield. 


Total. 


Per acre. 


Alfalfa 


71 

68 

5 

51 

6 

520 

489 

4 

1,906 


86 

100 

5 

166 


1.2 

1.5 
1.0 
3.2 


118.00 

.65 

15.00 

3.20 


$1,548 

65 

75 

531 

510 

8,016 

821 

840 

9,213 


121.80 


Bar.cv 


.96 


Com K>dder... 


15.00 


Flax 


ia4i 


Oarc'en 


85.00 


Hay« 


Ton 

Bushel.... 

...do 

...do 

Tota 


334 
1,263 

700 
4,774 


.6 

2.6 

175.0 

2.5 


24.00 
.65 
1.20 
1.93 


15.41 


Oats 


L68 


Potatoes 


2iaoo 


Wheat 


4.84 






Total cropped acreage. 


3,119 


and average 


J 


21,619 


6.93 









Fall plowed . 
Total.. 



Areas. 



767 Irrigab'e area farms reported . 
Cropped area farms reported. 



3,886 



Aores. 


Farms. 


Percent 

of 
project. 


1 

5.197 
3,119 


33 
33 


2.9 

1.7 



t 33 farms dry farmed. The greater part of these crops gro\n] on land inundated by spring floods. 
» Native blue Joint, 88 per cent; grain hay, 12 per cent. 



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MONTANA, MILK BIVEB PROJECT. 



179 



FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Condensed balance sheet. Milk River project (exdiuive of St. Mary storage unit) to June 

SO, 1919. 

Cash $2,507.43 

Inventory of materials and supplies on band 19,853.74 

Accounts receivabe 2,97&82 

Construction work contracted 6,160.56 

Gross construction cost $3,384,147.37 

Less construction revenue earnings $76,998.22 

Less cost adjustments »38.17 

76,960.05 

Net oonstruotion cost 3,307,187.33 

Accounts payable 9,866.42 

Contingent ob igations 7,757.98 

CoDecttons and oootiacts of specific amounts for repayments to reclamation fund 27, 218. 87 

Capital investment: 

Disbursement^ transfec and Joint construction, vouchers received $3, 448, 555. SO 

Cdllection transfer, refund and joint construction, vouchers issued 155, 623. 91 

yet Investment...; 3,292,931.59 

Feature m>sts of MUk River project (exclusive of St. Mary storage unit). 



Principal features. 


Fiscal voar 
1919. 


Total to June 
30, 1919. 


Examination and surveys: 

Chinook dirlsion 


$4,357.45 
4,258.43 
1,287.47 


555,327.65 


Malta division 


54,070.19 


Glasgow division 


16,346.80 








9,903.35 


125,744.64 


Storey svstom: 

leaver Reservoir • 


1,915.62 
5,470.03 
13,278.30 


1,915.62 


Chain Lakes 


5,476.03 


Nelson Reservoir 


67,457.20 








20,669.95 
51.31 


74,848.86 


Canal system: 

Howdoin 


62,748 06 


Chinook diversion (tram Milk River) 


699.76 


Chinook Canals 


4^8.20 

38,435.74 

174.31 

3,361.20 

402.51 

4,578.83 

743.23 


4. 788. 86 


Do Json di' prsion 


354, 012. C9 


Doison North Canal 


2^8,748.37 


Do'ison South Canal 


685,679.09 


Nelson Resen'rtr 


124,028.70 


Vandalia di version (from Milk River) 


447, 153. 09 


Vandalia South Canal 


407,419.97 






48,240.33 


2,295,278.50 


Lateral s^-stem: 

Bowrdoln laterals 


262.51 
744 24 

2.245.89 
21,452.63 

1,750.62 


62,331.67 


Doison North lUerals 


113,960.40 


Doison South 1 ^terals 


138,330.88 


Nelson Reservoir South laterals 


224,275 25 


Vandalia South laterals 


114,422.71 








26,455.89 


653,320.91 


Drainace system: 

Doison South system 


68.46 
833.78 


Z^S 99 


Nelson Reservoir South 


843. 18 








902.24 


1,052.17 


Flood protection: 

Doison South system 


2,400.11 


36, 475. 09 


VandaJia South system 


1,432.85 










2,400.11 


37,907.94 



> Contra entry. 



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180 EIGHTEENTH ANNVAL EEPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 
Feature costs of Milk River project (excltisive of St, Mary storage unit)~Contd. 



Prinotpal Teatures. 


Fiscal year 
1919. 


Total to June 
30, 1910. 


Irrignted lanr^s (farm units): 

Bowdoin .... 




941.45 


Do Ison North 




3,756.73 
8 674 51 


Doison South 


10.03 
375.14 
36.89 


Nolson fteservoir South 


1,094.27 
1,716.51 


yandalia South 








422.06 


16,183.47 


Permanent improvements: 

Doison Dam 


9.35 

ia48 

1,170.75 

'?,516.52 

1,077.45 


161.49 


Wajfner operation and maintenance camp 


4,303.71 


Malta pro ect headQuarters, buil lings and grounds 


15,302.34 


Sico ooeration and maintenance camp 


2,533.77 


Paisle / operation and maintenance camp 


2,421.22 






Telephone system : 

Malta... .' 


4,784.66 

1336.42 
6.069.48 
4,466.17 


24,722.53 
5,032.90 


Saco 


6,069.48 


Glasgow 


4,466.17 








10, 199. 23 


15,568.55 


Operation and maintenance during construction (water rental) 


. 33,779.80 


120,641.48 






Total cost of construction features 


157,757.61 


3,365,269.13 






Plant accounts: Undistributed clearing accounts 




18,878.24 








Gross construction cost 


157,757.51 


3, 384, 147. «7 






I^3s re .enies eirnel during construction period: 

Rental of buil Jings 


211.09 

4,318.18 

21,549.55 

> '612.68 

9.92 

62.44 

1808.87 


2,721.32 


Rental of ?rauns: and farming lands 


8,629.80 


Rental of irrigation water 


16,157.71 


Con tractor's freight re^mds 


18,796.03 


Other re enues, unclassi led w 


603 36 


Pro It on f irmin? ©Derations ! 


62.44 


Loss on hospital operations 


I ino. 61 






Total 


24,729.63 


76,960.05 




Net C3U of cDnitruction of project (exclusive of St. Mary storage unit).. . 


m'oiiTss 


3,307,187.32 



» Contra entry. » Decrease due to adjustment in this account. 

Statement of cost by calendar years^ Milk River project (exclusive of St, Mary storage unit). 



Ccmstmction. 



Year ending Dec. 31— 

1907 

1908 

1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 

1913 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

January to June 30, 1919 

Subtotal 3,244,627.65 

Plant and clearing accounts on June 30, 1919 18, 878. 24 



$86, 
105, 
222, 
153, 
66, 
162, 
761, 
671, 
332, 
245, 
217, 
173, 



882.22 
749.06 
954.92 
767.51 
913.43 
820.25 
123.58 
222.04 
483.85 
157.83 
036.13 
8^8.45 
678.38 



Total 3,203,505.89 



OpOTation and 
maintenance 
during con- 
struction. 



$6,379.82 
16,957.99 
13,449.85 
4,369.62 
5,789.97 
9,278.53 
15,337.13 
28,533.61 
20,544.96 



120,641.48 



Total cost. 



$86,882.22 
105,749.06 
223,954.92 
163,767.51 

73,293.35 
179,778.24 
774,573.43 
675,591.66 
338,373.83 
254,436.36 
233,373.36 
302,373.06 

65,233.34 



3,366,368.13 
18,878.34 



3,384,147.37 



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MONTANA, MILK RIVER PROJECT. 181 

Statement of cost by fiscal years, MUk River project (exclusive of St. Mary storage unit) 



Year ending June 30— 

1908 

1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 

1913 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

1919 



I I Operation and | 

: ConstrucUon. I '^^^ , Total cost. 
! struction. 



L 



I $92,919.05 

i 193,342.45 

I 216,606.81 

91,413.96 

I 62,418.44 

444,475.39 

713,312.38 

616,628.95 

241,813.93 

239,433.75 

' 208,285.84 

j 123,977.71 

Subtotal ' 3,244,627.65 

Plant and clearing accounts to June 30, 1919 , 18,878.24 



Total I 3,263,606.89 



$2,723.61 

13,202.49 

19,720.21 

3,147.58 

4,541.08 

7,680.24 

10,282.74 

25,563.73 

33,779.80 



120,641.48 



$92,919.05 
193,342.45 
216, 605. 8f 
94,137.50- 
75,620.93 
464,196.60' 
716,459.96- 
621,170.03 
249,949.17" 
249,7ia40» 
233,849.67 
157,757.51 



1,365,269.13 
18,878.24 



3,384,147.37 



Estimated cost of corUemplated work. Milk River project, dwring fiscal year 1920. 



Kxamination and surreys: 

Hydrometry 

Investigations 



Stora^ system: 

Chain Lakes Reservoir. . 

Nelson Reservoir 

Beaver Creek Reservoir. 



Canal system: 

IMversitm dams . 

Canals 

6trw*ture6 

Kquipment 



Lateral system: 

Laterals and waste-water ditches . 

Structures 

£quiiiment 



Drainage system surveys 

Flood protection 

Farm units 

Permanent improvements 

Operation and maintenance, water rentals. 
Reimbursable accounts 



Total. 



Sub- 
feature. 



$10,000 

- hdoa 



3,700 
400 
700 



1,000 
4,200 
4,800 
1,400 



36,500 

8,000 

800 



Principal 
feature. 



$11,000 



4,800 



11,400 



46,300 

3,900 

200 

1,000 

1,800 

76,500 
2,500 



159,000 



Condensed balance sheet, St. Mary storage unit, June SO, 1919. 



Inventory of stock on hand I 

Undehvered orders i 

Accounts receivable ' 

Gross constructiou cost I $2,571,327.30 

Less construction revenue earnings ' 29, 866. 70 

Net construction cost * 



Accounts payable i 

Contingent obligations ' 

Capital investment: | 

Disbursement, transfer, and Joint construction vouchers received I 2, 606, 879. 42 

CoUection,transfer,refund, and Joint construction vouchers issued ' 134,175.64 



Net investment. 



$31,814.71 

319. 4» 

2,684.34 



2,541,461.6a 



12,706.87 
819.49 



2, 662, 70S. 7« 



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182 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 
Feature costs of St, Mary storage unit to June SO, 1919, 
Principal features. 



Examinatirn and surreys 11,768.07 



Storage syst«m: , _, ^ _^, ^ 

8t. Wary l^akes Reservdr, surv^yliit, testing, etc , 

Sherburne Lakes Reservoir, surveying, testing, etc | S'^ 

Sherburne Lakes Dam ^ ^ 

Sherburne Lakes spillway 

Sherburne Lakes outlet 

Sherburne Lakes nnrtb hllldde slide 

Sherburne Lakes, Altyn trail ■ 

Sherburne Lakes spillway timber flume 



38,209.02 

4,072.90 

8,885.47 

S.M 

215.24 



Canal system: 

Preliminary and general work 

St. Mary Canal 

Kenneoy Creek crossing 

Diversirndamand beadworks 

Diversion dam, SwlftcurrentCreek..- 
Bndges, hifchways across main canal . 

Ccntrol check gate, statlrn 615-20 

Control check gate, station 91 



u 



03,091.83 



340.06 



Drons ... 

Kennedy Creek control check and sluice gates.. 

"Wasteway sluice gate, station 884 

Culvert, Fowell Creek crossing 

Culvert, east of Cow Creek 

Culvert. Cow Creek 

Spider Lake Coulee flume 

Sinhon, St. Mary River crossing 

Siphon, Halls Coulee crossing 

Road, alone St. Mary Canal 

Kennedy Creek bridge 



Flood protection: 

Kennedy Creek dikes 

Earth duces, stations 372 and 380. 



Permanent Improvements: 

Road, BroTMilng to St. Mary, camp No. 9. 

Road, Babb to Cardstrn. Canada 

Road, Babb to Canadian boundary 

Road, Babb to Glacier Park boundary.... 
Brad, St. Vary Challet to Babb, Mont.... 

OflRce bulldin?, camn No. 9 

Cottaees(4),camnNo. 9 

Wnler system, camp No. 9 

Gravelinc Swift current Canyrn road 

Steel bridije, St Mary River crossing 

Stoel bridge, camT> No. 2 

Headnuarters' office building (vault) 

Headniiartprs' cottages (3) 

Headquarters' o£Qce, other than vault 



M.70 



>7.77 



11.42 



187.45 
J 8. 57 
442.72 

247.77 



1,150.47 



Telephone system: 

Completed work 

Line along St. Mary Canal . 



Operation and maintenance, during construction, water-rental basis . 

Total c<>st of con St nicticn features 

Balance in niant accounts 

Undistributed clearm? accounts 

Gross construction cost to June 80, 1919 

Less revennfts wimM during construction period: 

Rental of biiildlnTS 

Rental of tele'^h^nes and tolls , 

Con t ract r rs freiph t refunds 

Other revenue, unclassified 

Profit on h js-'ital oporati'^n 

Other profits on operations, unclassified , 



Net cost of construction of project, to June 30. 1919 121,224 38 l 2,541,4Cl.w 



5.00 

116.00 

.7fi 

1,0«>.55 

1,446.04 

lift. 74 



2,P33.09 



400.35 



Total to Jime 
30, 1919. 



22.724.11 I 



T22,37G.92 



122,370.92 



11,547.21 

2.75 

116.58 



249.81 
2,403.77 



,152.54 



$52,167.50 



38,707.87 

13,210.92 

810,336.76 

258,3U.2S 

158,900.54 

11,370.48 

327.50 

215.24 



791,460.63 



133,729.25 

741,606.94 

80,146.47 

51,933.04 

84,849.65 

9,915.50 
12,885.77 

8,085.30 
85,880.66 
13,727.87 
11,100.45 

7,588.47 
16,443.85 

5,183.38 
36,623.90 
115,542.18 
46,044.19 

3,521.21 

2,188.55 



1, 416,980.97 

18,560.11 
1,225.70 



19,786.90 

45,803.87 
5,585.12 
1 140.03 

46,2P8.S5 
1,676.45 
1,3-^.65 
3,074.10 
5,3*9.37 

11,723.81 

34,409.42 

5,723.19 

1,080.55 

1.446.04 

116.74 



1 65,851.78 

11,880.90 
4,128.46 



If, 01 8. 36 



4?,974.ii 



2. 505, 239. 3i 
52,732.05 
13,355.90 



2,571,327.30 



18,112.07 
689.15 
6,793.01 
18.35 
1.453.64 
2,799.58 



29,8''5.70 



1 Deduct. 

Non.— No work actually done on canil system; on graveling; Swlftcurrent Canyon road, steel bridpe--8t. 
Mary River crissini, steel bri lie -c<\ra -> No. 2, under permanent Improvements; nor on telephone system. 
Cost for year represents cost_adjiisfments only. 



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MONTANA, MILK RIVER PROJECT. 
Cost statement y by calendar years, St. Mary storage unit. 



183 



t^onstructlon. 



Operation and 
maintenance 
during con- 
struction. 



Total cost. 



Year ending Dec. 31— 

1008 

1909 

1010 

1911 

1912 

1913 

1014 

1015 

1016 

1017 

1018 , 

January to June 30, 1919.. 

Subtotal 

Plant accounts 

Clearing accounts 



1197,453.33 

20,578.27 

28,833.89 

20,652.46 

188,141.58 

210,408.71 

544,384.54 

738,534.00 

206,227.42 

218,759.02 

117,111.66 

21,150.23 



2,402,265.14 
52,732.05 
13,355.90 



Total 2,528,353.00 



$3,371.75 
12,014.11 
17,152.30 
0,536.05 



42,074.21 



$197,453.33 
20,678.27 
28,833.80 
20,652.40 
138,141.58 
210,408.71 
644,38t.54 
738,584.00 
200,599.17 
231,673.13 
134,263.95 
30,683.28 



2,606,239.36 
62,732.06 
13,355.90 



2,571,327.80 



Cost Statement, by fiscal years, St. Mary storage unit. 





CoDstraotion. 


Operation and 

maintenance 

during con- 

structlan. 


Total cost. 


Year ending June 30— 

1908 


$172,596.63 

32,143.75 

26,369.09 

25,178.79 

30,424.90 

176,585.45 

296,911.39 

808,273.43 

406,831.86 

193,439.59 

193,857.45 

99,652.81 




$172,596.63 

32,113.75 

26,369.00 

25,178.70 

31,424.90 

176,585.45 

296,911.39 

808,273.43 

422, 792. 18 

184 895.76 


1909 




1910 




1911 




1912 




1913 




1914 




1915 




1016 


$15,960.32 
18,543.83 
12,833.61 
22,724.11 


1917 


1913 


206,691.00 
122,376.92 


1019 




Subtotal 


2,462,265.14 
52,732.05 
13,35.5.90 




2,505,239.35 
52 732.05 


Plant accounts 




CWf^ring nconunts. . . ^ x . 




13,355.9a 






Total 


2,528,353,09 


42,974.21 


2, 571, 327^30 





1 Deduct. 
Esthnated cost of contemplated work, St. Mary storage unit, during fiscal year 1920. 



Examination and surveys 

Storage system: Stierbume Lakes dam and reservoir. 
Canal system: 

Spl'Jer t^ou'ee flume 

Removal of s.ides and leakage prevention 

Permanent improvements 

Operation and maintenance, water rentals 

Reimbursable accounts 



Total. 



Sub- 
feature. 



$25,000 
28,500 



Principal 
feature. 



$1,600 
6,500 



53,500 

1,000 

12,000 

430 



75,000 



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MONTANA, SUN EIVEE PEOJECT. 

Geo. O. Sanford, project manager, Fort Shaw, Mont. 
LOCATION. 

Counties: Cascade, Chouteau, Lewis and Clark, Teton. 

Townships: 20 to 25 N., Re. 6 E. to 8 W., Montana meridian. 

Railroads: Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul; Great Northern. 

Railroad stations and estimated population June 30, 1919: Aahuelot;* Bole, 70; 
Cordova; » Dracut; * Fairfield, 150; Fort Shaw, 50; Gilman, 200; Power, 100; Rieb- 
ling; 1 Simma, 150; Sloan; » Sun River, 65; Vaughn.* 

WATBB SUPPLY. 

Source of water supply: Sun River and tributaries, Deep Creek, Bowl Creek, and 
Basin Creek. 

Area of drainage basins: Sim River, 1,070 square miles; Deep Creek, 260 square 
miles; Bowl Creek, 9 square miles; Basin Creek, 15 square miles. 

Annual run-off in acre-feet: North Fork of Sun River, near Augusta, 1905-1915, and 
at Sun River Diversion Dam, 1916-1918, maximum, 1,127,400; minimimi, 375,700; 
mean, 679,400. Willow Creek, near Augusta, 1906-1918, maximum, 42,460* minimum, 
8,070; mean, 23,000. Sun River, at Sun River, 1905-1912, and at Fort Shaw, 1913- 
1918, maximum, 1,289,000; minimum, 429,550; mean, 911,200. South Fork of Sun 
River, near Augusta, 1905-1918, maximum, 159,735; minimum, 28,027; mean, 83,600. 

AGBICTJLTTTBAL AND CLIMATIC CONDITIONS. 

Area for which service is prepared to supply water atason of 1919: 40,057 acres. 

Area under water-right application season of 1919: 11,933 acres. 

Area imder rental contracts season of 1918: 12,580 acres. 

Area having vested water rights: 145.3 acres. 

Length of irrigation season, May 1 -October 10: 163 days. 

A\erBge elevation of irrigable area: 3,700 feet above sea level. 

Rainfall on irrigable area: For 31 years, average 11.05 inches; 1918, 7.07 inches. 

Range of temperature on irrigable area: —40° to 100° F. 

Character of soil of irrigable area: Sandv loam, clay, adobe, and alluviiun. 

Principal products: Hay, grain, vegetables, live stock, and dairy products. 

Principal markets: Great Falls, Seattle, St. Paul, Minneapolis, and Chicago. 

LANDS OPENED FOB IBBIGATION. 

Dates of public notices: March 26, 1908; November 19, 1910; March 28, 1911; March 
2 and Julv 13, 1912; June 23, 1913; September 24, 1914; March 20 and March 26, 1915; 
January 15, 1916; March 14, 1917; March 22, 1918; and April 29, 1919. 

Location of lands opened: Tps. 20 and 21N., Rs. lto3W., Montana meridian. 

Limit of area of farm units: 160 acres. 

Duty of water: 2 acre-feet per acre at the farm. 

Building char^ per acre of irrigable land: $30 to $36. 

Annual operation and maintenance chaige: For the irrigation years 1918 and 1919, 
$1.70 per acre of irrigable land, entitling the water user to 1} acre-feet of water per 
irritable acre, with an additional charge of 50 cents for each additional foot of water 

CHBONOLOGICAL SXJMMABY. 

Reconnoissance made and preliminary surveys be&^un in 1905. 

Construction recommended by board of engineers February 13, 1906. 

Construction authorized by Secretary February 26, 1906. 

Fort Shaw Main Canal completed July, 1908. 

First irrigation by Reclamation Service season of 1909. 

Fort Shaw unit completed December, 1909. 

Willow Creek Dam completed, present development November 7, 1911. 

Sun River Diversion Dam completed March, 1915. 

First irrigation of north side lands season of 1919. 

Entire project 44.2 per cent completed June 30, 1919: 

1 Less than 25 
184 



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MONTANA, SUN RIVER PROJECT. 185 

IBBIGATION PLAN. 

The irrigation plan of the Sun River project, so far approved, provides for the storage 
of water in Sun River storage reservoir on the North Fork of Sun River, in the Willow 
Creek Reservoir on Willow Creek, and in Pishkun Reservoir north of Sun River; the 
diversion of water from the North Fork of Sun River through a supply canal for the 
Pishkun Reservoir; the diversion of water from Sun River, supplemented by stored 
waters released from Sun River storage and Willow Creek Reservoir, into a, canal 
Bvstem watering lands mainly in the abandoned Fort Shaw Military Reservation; and 
the diversion of water from Pishkun Reservoir into the Sun River Slope Canal, supply- 
ing water for lands on the north side of Sun River. 

Possible future development may include the diversion of water from Bowl and 
Basin Creeks, tributaries of Flathead River, across the Continental Divide to Sun 
River drainas^; the diversion of water from the North Fork of Sun River into a supply 
canal for Willow Creek Reservoir; the diversion of flood waters from Deep Creek into 
Pishkun Reservoir; the construction of a reservoir on Muddy Creek and of a canal 
system leading therefrom for the irrigation of lands lying on the north side of Sun 
Kiverinthevicinityof Vaughn and Manchester; the storage of water in Benton Lake 
Reservoir for the irri^tion of lands lying north of Great Falls; and the diversion of 
water from the Sun River for the irrigation of lands lying west of Great Falls. 

The United States claims all waste, seepage, unappropriated, spring, and perco- 
lating water arising within the project and proposes to use such water m connection 
therewith. 

The Fort Shaw division and the Willow Creek Reservoir (first development 16,640 
acre-feet) have been' completed. The Pishkun Canal (first development of 1,000 
second-feet) and the Sun River Slope Canal (first development of 500 second-feet) have 
been completed, but require further puddling to prevent leakage. The Greenfields 
Canal (first development 500 second-feet) has been completed escceipt the lining with 
concrete of about 900 linear feet. The Greenfields South and ^1 Coulee Canals 
have been excavated. The lateral system for about 25,000 acres in the first unit of 
the Greenfields division has been completed, but requires the addition of structures 
and minor lateral extensions to provide deliveries to unentered public, private, and 
State lands. 

STTKMABY OF GENERAL DATA FOB SUN BIVEB PBOJEOT TO END 
OF FISCAL YEAR 1919. 

Areas: 

Irrigable acreage when project is complete 174, 620 

Public land entered to June 30, 1919 55, 641 

Public land open to entry on June 30, 1919 437 

Public land withdrawn on June 30, 1919 39, 626 

State land June 30, 1919 12, 034 

Railroad land June 30, 1919 260 

Private land June 30, 1919 66, 622 

Acreage service could have supplied in season of 1919 40, 057 

Estimated acreage service can supply in season of 1920 40, 057 

Acreage irrigated season of 1918 7, 569 

Acreage cropped under irrigation season of 1918* 7,832 

Acreage dry farmed season of 1918 109 

Crops: 

Value of irrigated crops season of 1918 $245, 852. 00 

Value of irrigated crops per acre cropped $31. 39 

Value of dry farmed crops season of 1918 $1, 998. 48 

Value of dry farmed crops per acre cropped. $18. 33 

Finances: 

Net construction cost to June 30, 1919 $3, 729, 074. 91 

Per cent completed on June 30, 1919 44. 2 

Appropriated for fiscal year 1920 $141, 000. 00 

Estmiated per cent complete by June 30, 1920 46. 

Proposed appropriation for fiscal year 1921 148, 000 

Estimated per cent complete by June 30, 1921 47. 5 

Announced construction charges per acre $30 and $36 



1 Acreage cropped on 187 farms using water, season of 1018, of which 7,5i>8 acres were irrigated; 11 
acres were inigated other than farms, miklni: a total of 7,580 acres irrigated on project. Value of crops 
on above 187 farms is on a cropped area of 7,832 acres. 



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186 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

Finances — Continued . 

Appropriation fiscal year 1919 $222, 000. 00 

Carriea over from fiscal year 1916 appropriation 100, 000. 00 

Increase under 10 per cent provision 22, 200. 00 

Increase miscellaneous collections 12, 241. 85 

Special appropriation 467. 12 

Appropriation for increased compensation 14, 480. 45 

$371,389.42 

Expenditures chargeable to 1919 appropriation: 

Disbursements 296, 959. 19 

Transfers 29, 958. 09 

Current liabilities 25, 827. 60 

Contingent liabilities 975. 10 

. 353,7U.98 

Unencumbered balance on July 1, 1919 17, 669. 44 

Repavments: 

Value of construction water-right contracts 395, 799. 35 

Construction chaiges: 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 115, 328. 60 

Collected to June 30, 1919 Ill, 951. 14 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 3, 377. 46 

Operation and maintenance charges (public notice): 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 81,391.94 

Collected to June 30, 1919 75, 509. 14 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 5, 882. 80 

Water-rental charges: 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 1,478.50 

Collected to June 30, 1919 1, 223. 50 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 255. 00 

Drainage: Estimated acreage damaged by seepage to June 30, 1919. . . 22. 50 

CONSTBUCmON DTTBING FISCAL YEAB. 

At the beginning of the fiscal year work was in progress on the 
securing and delivery of gravel and sand for the concrete lining of 
the Greenfields Canal and on the completion by Government forces 
of the construction of structures in tne Greenfields division imder 
suspended contract No. 649. 

oiforth Side Canal system, — Immediately after the beginning of the 
fiscal year when funds became available, active work on the concrete 
lining of portions of the Greenfields Canal was commenced. Poor 
progress was made during the first half of the fiscal year, due to the 
mability to secure a sufficient supply of labor. During the latter 
part of the fiscal year labor conditions as regards supply and quality 
were somewhat improved, and the work was completed m May, 1919. 
On account of lack of sufficient funds about 500 linear feet of canal 
lining were temporarily eliminated, but developments after water 
was turned into the canal made it apparent that not only would this 
section require lining as soon as conditions will permit, but that it 
wiD have to be extended to cover about 900 linear feet. 

The priming and puddling of the North Side Canal system and 
construction oi operation road were continued with what lunds were 
available. The limited amoimt of water that could be rim in the 



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MONTANA, SUN RIVER PROJECT. 187 

canal prior to the completion of the concrete lining of the Greenfields 
Canal was not sufficient to render sluicing for puddling purposes 
practicable, so this work was discontinued. The construction of op- 
eration roads was continued at intermittent intervals as a force 
became available. 

Work on the construction of structures to permit the utilization 
of Elbow Coulee as a wasteway channel was begun early in the fiscal 
year but on account of the shortage of labor the progress made was 
very poor. In the spring of 1919 the work was resumed, but on ac- 
count of the necessity of reducing expenditures was discontinued 
before much was accomplished. 

Lateral system. — Work on the completion by Government forces of 
suspended contract No. 649 was continued and was completed in 
December, 1918, although the accounts of the contractor nave not 
yet been settled. The completion of this work permits the delivery 
of water to the lands in the first unit of the Greenfields division. 

Permanent improvements, — A contract was let to Chapman & Wil- 
kinson, of Simms, Mont., for the erection of a cottage, office, lodging 
house, garage, and stable at Fairfield, Mont., to serve as operation 
and mamtenance headquarters for the Greenfields division. At the 
close of the fiscal year about 70 per cent of the work covered by the 
contract had been completed. 

SEEPAGE AND DBAINAGE. 

About 13 per cent of the 14,920 acres in the Fort Shaw division 
is affected by seepage or alkali. 

No action has been taken by the farmers leading to the drainage 
of the affected areas. 

OPEBATION AND MAINTENANCE. 

The absence of the usual spring rains resulted in a heavv demand 
for irrigation water in 1918. The water supply in Sim River was 
sufficient, although the river reached a very low stage early in the 
month of August. The rainfall during the irrigation season was 
about 6 inches, which is 1 inch less than that of 1917 and very much 
lower than that of any other season since the project was opened. No 
serious trouble was encountered in operation. The total amoimt of 
water diverted during the season was 30,087 acre-feet, of which 
11,193 acre-feet were delivered to the land; 46 per cent of this amount 
was delivered during the month of June, ana about 17 per cent in 
August. The duty of water was 1.48 acre-feet per acra The op- 
eration and maintenance charge was $1.70 per imgable acre whether 
water was used or not, entitling the user to IJ acre-feet per irrigable 
acre. Additional water was mmished for 50 cents per acre foot. 

Irrigation on the Fort Shaw division in the spring of 1919 began 
April 26 and continued with little interruption. A break in the main 
canal at about mile 8 caused by burrowing animals occurred early in 
May and delayed deliveries to the lower end of the system. As there 
was an absence of the usual spring rains in May and June the demand 
for irrigation water was unusually heavy. A sudden drop in Sun 
River about June 23 made it necessary to cut through a gravel bar 
which had formed in front of the Fort Shaw canal head works before 
a sufficient head of water could be diverted into the canal. At the 



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188 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

close of the fiscal year the flow of Sun River had become so low as 
to render dubious the outlook for a sufficient water supply for the 
remainder of the irrigation season. 

Irrigation began on the first unit of the Greenfields division on 
June 6, 1919. A maximum quantity of 154 second-feet was deliv- 
ered to the head of the lateral system. Farmers that were in shape 
to handle water were scattered over the bench, a few being located 
on each lateral. To make deliveries to those requesting water ne- 
cessitated running a small head of water in all the main laterals, 
resulting in heavy losses. The laterals on the west end of the bench 
showed the heaviest loss through seepage; those on the lower end 
held comparatively well. Russian thistles blowing into the ditches 
and trash coming down the canal from above interfered with deUv- 
eries. As a rule, the farmers' head ditches and field laterals were 
found to be too small for adequate irrigation heads. On the Green- 
fields division 2,379 acre-feet of water were delivered to users and 
2,764 acres were irrigated. 

The following table shows the maximum storage and water surface 
elevations in Willow Creek Reservoir during the irrigation seasons 
the past five years, 1918 included: 



Year. 


Capacity. 

Acre-feet. 
16,700 
16,700 
16,700 
16,700 
16 700 


Maximum 
storage. 

Acre-fett. 
15, 100 
16,0J0 
19,000 
11,545 
8 042 


1914 , 


1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 









Elevation 
of water 
surface. 



4,128.9 

4,129.15 

4,132.5 

4,124.5 

4,119.5 



There was a very light run-off in Willow Creek watershed in 1918. 
No water was drawn from the reservoir from May 3 to August 1, 
yet the storage had only increased from 1,900 acre-feet to 8,042 
acre-feet, which was approximately the amount impounded at the 
close of the year. No storage water was used for irrigation. 

In 1918 maintenance work on the Fort Shaw division consisted of 
cleaning laterals, replacing worn-out structures, installing structures 
for deliveries to new units, and constructing log cribs in Sun River 
for the protection of the Fort Shaw Canal headworks. A labor 
shortage delayed the prosecution of work early in the spring. The 
weather was excellent, but the necessity of using the laterals early 
in the season prevented cleaning laterals to the extent plannedf. 
Good progress, however, was made in replacing old and installing new 
structures. 

On the Greenfields division a maintenance camp was established 
early in the season. Silt and weeds which had blown during the winter 
completely filled long stretches of laterals. One crew worked con- 
tinuously during the spring and early summer removing this material; 
another crew was employed about two months burning Russian 
thistles. 



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MONTANA, SUN KTVEB PROJECT. 
Historical review, Sum River project. 



It«m. 



1013 



Acreage for which service was pre- | 

pared to supply water 16,346 

Acreage irrigated 7,419 

Miles of canal operated 121 

Water diverted (acre-feet) 2^,566 

Water delivered to land f acre-feet )....! 11, 187 

Per acre of land irrigated (acre-feet) ! 1.5 



1914 


1915 


1916 


1917 


16,346 


16,346 


16,322 


16,224 


6,613 


4,261 


M,717 


•6,676 


110 


100 


100 


100 


24,762 


15,538 


17,841 


25,841 


11,468 
1.73 


4,653 


• 5,757 
1.22 


• 9,091 
1.36 


1.1 



189 



I 

1918 I 19191 



1 To June 3). 

• Includes 10 acres irrigated other than farms. 

• Includes 20 acres Irrigated other than farms. 

• 11.25 acres imgated other than farms. 

» Includes 32 acre-feet delivered to town sites, etc. 

• Includes 65 acre-feet delivered to town sites, etc. 
^51.1 acre-feet delivered to United States reserves, etc. 

• 1,479 acre-feet delivered to canal of >Iowerree Sheep & Horse Co. 



I 
14,978 

96 \ 
30,087 
Ml, 193 ; 
1.48 ' 

I 



40,057 

9,628 

244 

32,9)«6 

• 13, 782 

1.43 



SBTTLBICENT. 

Fair crops and good prices have encouraged the farmers on the 
Fort Shaw division. As a rule, they are using better methods in 
handling their land and the matter of good seed is being given more 
attention. Dairy farming, which has developed during the past two 
years, is one of the principal sources of income. 

Land values have increased very materially and good irrigable 
land is strongly in demand. Sales ranging from $100 to $125 per 
acre were made with a limited amount of land on the market. Grood 
alfalfa land not thoroughly developed can be bought at lower prices. 

On June 13, 1919, a decree was issued by the court forming the 
Fort Shaw irrigation district. 

Settlement data^ Fort Shaw unitj Sun River project.^ 



Item. 



Total number of farms on project 

Population 

Number of Irrigated farms 

Operated by owner or managers 

Operated by tenants 

Population 

Number d towns 

Population 

Total population in towns and on farms. . 

Nummr of public schools 

Number ot churdies 

Number of banks , 

Total capital stock 

Amount of deposits 

Number of depositors 

Number of relinouishments 

Number of cancellations 

Homestead entries 




1916 



265 

• 600 

158 

103 

. 55 

436 

3 

179 

779 

4 

3 

1 

$29,000 

$85,000 

290 

4 

2 

5 



1917 



254 

•640 

176 

120 

56 

476 

3 

168 

808 

4 

4 

1 

$23,000 

$95,000 

310 

1 



5 



1918 



600 

187 

118 

69 

508 

3 

158 

768 

4 

4 

1 

$20,000 

$98,000 

390 

3 



8 



1919 



t245 

t610 

•192 

•122 

•70 

•520 

3 

•150 

•760 

4 

4 

1 

$20,000 

•$110,000 

•400 

•4 



•6 



1 Does not include first unit of Greenfields division placed under irrigation in June, 1919. 
• Estimated. 

PBINCIPAL CBOPS. 

AKalfa on the Fort Shaw division in 1918 comprised about 47 J per 
cent of the cropped area and about 56 per cent of the value of all 
crops raised. Tne average yield per acre for the irrigated alfalfa 
was 1.82 tons compared to 1.7 tons in 1917 and 1.63 tons in 1916. 
Wheat, the second crop of importance, amounted to 27 per cent of 
the cropped acreage and 24 per cent of the total crop value. The 
season was imfavorable for grain production; prevailing hot weather 



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190 EIGHTEENTH ANlirUAL REPOET OF RECLAMATION SEBVICB. 

at the time the wheat was stooling and a blight which struck a 
number of fields were factors that account for the low yields. There 
was an increase in the acreage seeded to oats and a slight increase 
in the yie'd per acre. The potato acreage decreased about 40 per 
cent over that of 1917. Dry rot injured the early seeding and the 
stand was poor. The potato market was very unfavorable for the 
ffrowerg. The total value of 'all crops raisea on the Fort Shaw 
division in 1918 was $247,850.73 compared to $226,450 in 1917. 
The average yield for units using water was $31.39 and for units 
farmed dry, $18.33. 

The sprmg of 1919 was very dry. All grain crops had to be irri- 
gated up. Aside from a few fields, the outlook for average grain 
yields is not promising. The first cutting of alfalfa hay on theTort 
Shaw division was unusually heavy and the quality is excellent. 
The hay crop is about 10 days in advance of most seasons, which 
indicates that a third cutting may be secured. 

On the Greenfields bench the extremely dry season resulted in a 
very imeven and poor stand of grain. Cutworms began to work on 
the grain early in the season and Russian thistles came up very 
thick in the fields, sapping the ground and crowding out the plants. 
As soon as water was available some of the best of the early wheat 
was irrigated, but the grain had little vitality and failed to respond 
to the application of water. A few fields of late grain that have 
been irrigated are looking fine and a small acreage of flax gives 
promise of a fair yield. Alfalfa that was seeded in the spring and 
given proper irrigation is in good condition. 

Prices lor farm products in 1918 ranged about the same as in 1917. 

Crop repcTt for farm units using yxUer, Sun River project^ Montana {Fort Shaw division)t 

year of 1918. 



Crop. 



Alfara 

Alfalfa seed 

Barley 

Beans 

Clover hay 

Clover seed 

Com 

Flax 

Fruits, small 

Garden 

Hay, except alfalfa.. 

Oats 

Pasture 

Potatoes 

Wheat 

Sunflowers 




Total cropped acreage. 7, 832 



Number of acres irrigated 
on 187 farms 

Total irrigated acreage . 



Area 

(acres). 





Yields. 




Values. 


Unit of 


Total. 


Averare 
per acre. 






yield. 


Per unit 1 
of yield. 


Totel. 


Ton 


6,924.1 


1.84 


$20.00 1 


$139,081 


Bushel.... 


218.5 


4.28 


12.00 


2,622 


..do 


986.5 


25.46 


1.20 


1,184 


..do 


20.33 


16.11 


9.00 


183 


Ton 


15 


1 


20.00 


300 


Bushel.... 


174 


4.7 


15.00 


2,610 


..do 


120 


10.9 


2.00 


240 


..do 


121 


3.46 


3.00 


363 


Pound 


310 


1,033.3 


.50 


155 


Acre 









6,533 
3,114 


Ton 


18.3 


.94 


17.00 


Bushel.... 


13,247.14 


25.77 


.99 


13, 135 


Acre 






7.60 < 
.60 


6,605 
10,754 


Bushel.... 


17,574.00 


151.07 


..do 


30,622.85 


14.46 


1.90 ; 


58,183 


Ton 


70 


70 


10.00 


700 



Total and average. 



245,852 



Per acre. 



$36.91 
51.41 
30.55 

146.40 
20.00 
70.54 
21.80 
10.37 

616.67 

138.06 
16.05 
25.55 
7.60 
92.47 
27.46 

100.00 



31.39 



7,558 I 
7,569 I 



Areas. 



Total irrigable area farms reported . . 
! Total irrigable area farms reported, 

I less seep, etc 

I Total irrigated area ''arms reported: 
Under water-right applications . 

Under rental contracts » 

I Under vested rights 

Total cropped area farms reported. . 



Acres. I Famw. 



i Percent 
jof project 



I I 

> Includes 24-acre tract at Fort Shaw headquarters. 



Digitized by 



10,566 I 

9,136 ' 

7,332 , 
108 
117 , 

7,832, 



187 

187 ! 

180 
4 ' 
3 



70.54 
60.93 

48.05 
.72 
.78 

52.28 



Google 



MONTANA, SUN lOVEB PROJECT. 



191 



Crop report for farm units farmed ^^dry,** Sun River project ^ Montana (Fort Shaw divi- 
sion) , year of 1918. 



Crop. 



Barley.... 
Garden... 

Hav 

Oats , 

Pasture... 
Potatoes.. 
Wheat.... 



Area 

(acres). 



15 

1.25 
21 

5 
38 

.75 
28 



Total cropped 109 



Unit of 
yield. 



Bushel... 



Acre. 
Ton.. 
Bushel... 

Acre 

Bushel... 
..do 



Yields. 



Total. 



300 



21 
150 



100 
309.2 



Average 
per acre. 



Per unit 
of yield. 



20 



11.20 



1 
30 



15.00 
1.00 



133.33 
11.04 



.60 
1.90 



Total and average. 



Values. 



Total. 



1360 
175 
315 
150 
351 
60 
687 



1,998 



Per acre. 



S24.00 
140.00 
15.00 
30.00 
9.23 
80.00 
20.98 



18.33 



Areas. 



Total irrigable area farms reported, 
•dry 

Total irrigable area farms reported, 
less seep, etc 

Total cropped area farms reported. . 



Acres. 



154 



102 
109 



Number 
of farms. 



Percent 
of project. 



1.03 



.68 
.73 



PUBLIC NOTICES AND OBDBBS. 
PUBLIC NOTICE, APRIL 29, 1919. 

1. Land for which water will be furnished. — In pursuance of the 
provisions of section 4 of the reclamation act of June 17, 1902 (32 
Stat., 388), and of acts amendatory thereof or supplemental^ thereto, 
notice is hereby given that upon proper application being made 
therefor water will be furnished under the Fort Shaw division of the 
Sun River project, Montana, in the irrigation season of 1919 and there- 
after for the irrigable land in NE. \ NW. i, or farm unit M, sec. 13, 
T. 20 N., R. 3 W., Montana principal meridian, shown on diagram 
approved March 23, 1918, by the Director of the Reclamation Serv- 
ice, amendatory of farm unit plat of said township approved by the 
Secretary of the Interior, March 23, 1918. Copies of the amendatory 
diagram and township plat are on file at the office of the project 
manager. United States Reclamation Service, at Fort Shaw, Alont., 
and at the local land office at Great Falls, Mont. 

2. Glasses of charges for water rights. — The water-right charges 
are of two kinds, to wit: (1) A charge against each irrigable acre to 
cover cost of construction of the imgation system, termed the con- 
struction charge; and (2) an annual charge against each irrigable 
acre to cover cost of operation and maintenance of the system, 
termed the operation and maintenance charge. 

3. Construction charge. — The construction charge shall be $50 per 
acre of irrigable land. Five per cent of the construction charge shall 
be paid at the time of filing water-right application, and the remainder 
of the construction charge shall be paid in 15 annual installments, 
the first 5 of which shall each be 5 per cent and the remainder each 
7 per cent of the total construction charge. The first of said 15 
annual installments shall become due and payable December 1 of 
the fifth calendar year after the initial installment, and subsequent 



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192 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

installments shall become due and payable on December 1 of each 
calendar year thereafter. 

4. Operation and maintenance charge. — The operation and main- 
tenance charge for the irrigation season of 1919 and thereafter until 
further notice shall be of the same amount as for other like lands 
under the said division and project. Such charge will be due and 
payable on March 1 of each year for the preceding irrigation season 

John W. Hallowell, 
Assistant to the Secretary of the Interior. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Condensed balance sheets Sun River project^ June SOy 1919. 

Cash 12,525.17 

Inventory of materials and supplies on band 41, 540. 66 

Accounts receivable: 

Current accounts receivable 21,857.57 

Construction water-rijjht charges imaccrued 280, 470. 75 

Construction work contracted 30,564.30 

Gross construction cost 13, 775,095.92 

Less construction revenue earnings 46, 021 . 01 

Net oonstmction oo6t 3,729,074.91 

Gross operation and maintenance cost 128,414.68 

Less operation and maintenance revenue earnings 446.55 

127,968.13 

Accounts payable 18,985.17 

Contingent obllTations 42,076.81 

Collections and contracts of specific amounts for repayments to reclamation fund 516, 561. 08 

Miicollaneous accruals 15, 817. 80 

Capital investment: 

Disbursements and transfer and joint construction vouchers received 4, 040, 415. 07 

Less collections, refunds and transfer, and joint construction vouchers 

issued 390,864.44 

Net investment 3,649,560.63 

Feature costs of Sun River project to June SOy 1919. 



Features. 



Exarainition and surveys: 

Investigation and surveys 

Expprimental (lumcs , 

Expprimc ntal measuring devices 

Experimental concrete pipe and blocks.. 



Storaw works: 

Willow Creek R'?servoir Dam and outlet work. 

Warm Springs Reservoir (site) 

Beaver Cfeck Reservoir (site) 

ri-?hkun Reservoir 

Muddy Creek Ri scrvoir 

Benton Lake Restrvoir 



Canal svstem: 

Fort Shaw Canal , 

Pishkun Canal 

Sun River Slope Canal .. 
Grecnflclds main canal . . 

Teton Canal 

(irecnftelds Lake Canal. 
Sunnyside Canal 



Fiscal year 
1919. 



$84L99 
15.93 
2.67 
13.32 



873.91 



582.45 



Total to June 
30, 1919. 



1 486. 76 I 
L33 ; 



97.02 



160.00 i 

8,457.10 I 

52.359.61 I 

128,22L15 I 



109.54 I 
I 



$52,217.25 
607.13 
227.09 
108.08 



53,160.15 



282,83L91 
31,796.93 
26,329.86 
35,962.86 
736.42 
1,713.50 



379,37L57 



233,363.52 

1,225,305.17 

663,343.94 

304,351.71 

19,719.76 

472.76 

1,732.09 



189.307.40 2,448,288.95 



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MONTANA, SUN BIVEB PROJECT. 
Feature costs of Sun River project to June SO, 1919 — Continued. 



193 



Featoras. 


Fiscal year 
1010. 


Total to June 
80, 1010. 


Lateral system: 

Fort Shaw dirl^UoB 




1266,302.21 
1,379.61 


San River Slope dl ision 




Oreonflelds di\ i^ion , 


$122,347.55 


407,347.22 


MIU Coulee dl vision 


12,540.61 
454.17 


TetoQ division 












122,247.55 


718,002.82 


Farm units: 

Fort Shaw division 




3,198.30 


Greenfields division 


2,04S.29 


I6,I0a48 








2,048.29 


10,208.78 


Permanent Improvements: 
Bmldincs— 
Simms 




1,515.16 


^'ilmMi . 


23 17 


2,200.77 


Willow Creek 


888.42 


Sun River diversion 





1,306.41 


Cam p No. 9 




1,801.80 


r^inp N"o- 1 1 - , . ,,,,,, 




1,607.32 


f^amp ^'o, 12 , . , ...... 




1,748.66 


Camp No. 13 (Fairfield) 


7,588.50 


9,209.08 


Camp No. 14 


1,733.51 


Bridf^ anro*» Snn River at Fort Shaw 




634.09 


Itoads: 

Gilman to Sun River diversion 


1998.93 


0,405.62 


Sun River dl version to Warm Springs 


18,518.07 










6,614.74 


50,560.81 


Telephone system: 

Great Falls to Willow Creek 




7,474.70 


Willow Creek to Warm Sprinip 




4,138.67 


Willow Creek eut-o/T to North Sideline. . . 


1.75 


415. 40 


Sun River diversion to '^roen-l-'lds main canal, station 225 


7, 17a 34 


Greeniieids main canil. station 225, lo Fort Shaw 




3,412.70 


Greenfields dl\ li>ian local lines *. 


91.43 


6,437.50 








93.18 


29,049.40 


Operation and maintenance during construction 


15,497.48 
U60.00 


15,407.48 


Operation and maintenance charges transferred to and added to construo- 
ti<wi charges 


2,518.90 






Gross cost of construction features 


336,619.57 


3,715,847.86 






Babmoe in unadjusted clearing accoimts. 




13.292.72 


IVfthynm \r\ plant aceoimts . , . 




62,540.78 








Gross construction cost .* 


336,619.57 


3,775,096.02 






Less revenues eamt»d during construction season: 

Rentals of build inG!s . ^, . 


678.17 

10,432.21 

2.95 


15.067.48 


H'ntai«J of grftzinp; and ff^rm lands * 


10,432.21 


Ri ntals of telephone snd tolls. . 


321.50 


Contractors' frcitrfit refunds 


18,253.85 


Other revenues, imclas'^i led 


.302.93 
239.07 


305.43 


Profit on hospital operations 


1,640.54 








11,655.33 


46,021.01 


Net effli^tTfvtlon eff«t, Jime 30, 1919. . 


324,964.24 


3, 729, 074. M 







' Deduct. 



13S554— 10- 



-15 



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194 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL. REPOBT OF RECLAMATION SBRVICB, 
Statement of cost by calendar years, Sun River project. 





Coostmo- 
tion. 








During ooo:!- 
strucuon. 


Under pub- 
lic notioe. 


Total. 


Total coat. 


Year ending Dec. 31— 

1902777 


1617.52 

3,033.06 

11,543.66 

84,821.28 

20,824.18 

341,530.67 

81.106.04 

56.344.03 

148.541.21 

100,157.42 

311.855.71 

382,342.46 

007,346.02 

851.322.27 

258.54227 

137,287.23 

350.12503 

46.015.72 








8617.52 


1908 








2,022.06 


1904 








lll548.66 


1905...* 








84,821.28 


1906 








20.824.18^ 


1907 








241,530.67 


1908 




68,980.75 
14.471.51 
9,413.27 
6.849.71 
9,762.99 
12.517.66 
11,060.87 
6.026.24 
13.262.25 
8.262.56 
16.252.73 
0.208.26 


88,080.75 

14.471.61 

0,418.27 

6.840.71 

0,762.00 

12.517.66 

11,060.87 

6.026.24 

13,262.25 

8,26256 

16.252.78 

24,705.74 


00,038. 7» 


1009 




70,816.44 


1910 




157.054.48- 


1911 




107.007.18 


1912 




221.618. 7» 


1913 




244.860.12 


1914 




018.407.70 


1915 




858.248.51 


1915 




271.804.52 


1917 




145.540.79 


1918 


fisiw.'is* 


375.378.66^ 


January to Jane 30, 1010 


60.721.4^ 






Subtotal 


3,700,360.38 
62.540.78 
13,202.72 


15,407.48 


126,018.80 


142,416.28 


8,842,766.66 


Plant 


62.540.7& 


Undistributed clearing aoooonts 




1.405.88 


1,405.88 


U,7D6.84 






Total 


8,750,508.44 


15,407.48 


128,414.68 


143.012.16 


8,008,510.60 







1 Deduct. 

Non.— Difflerenoes from preylous reports in amounts shown due to diange in method for handling plant 
and undistributed elearing accounts. 

Statement of cost by fiscal years. Sun River project. 





Construo- 
tion. 


Operation and maintenance. 






During con- 
strucuon. 


Under pub- 
Uc notioe. 


Total. 


Total oost. 


Year ending June 30— 

1003 


8622.52 

2,281.04 

29.206.07 

26.466.71 

94.159.97 

210.166.72 
44.331.02 
79.794.09 

166.749.62 
60.091.12 








$622.52 


1904 








2.281.04 


1905 








29. 205. 07 


1906 








36.466.71 


1907 




1 


94.150.07 


1906 




1 


210.165.72 


1909 




$21,276.23 : $21,276 23 
11,18834 11,18834 
4,063.00 4,063.00 
5.856.26 5.865 26 
13,997.50 13.997.50 


66.606.25 


1910 




00. 082. 48 


1911 




160,812 52 


1912 




74.04638 


1913 


274.344.16 
665.879.09 
906,948.10 
602,097.84 
144,732.64 
182.35968 




288.341.66 


1914 




11.188.54 
8.731.68 
9.882.00 
10.308.97 
16,674.68 
14,753.70 


11.188 64 
8. 731. 68 
9.882.00 
10.308.97 
15,674.68 
30,251.18 


567.067.63 


1916 




015. 670. 68 


1916 




611.97084 


1917 




155,041.61 


1918 




108. 034. 36 


1919 


321.122.09 1 8i5.497.48 


351,373. 27 






. Subtotal 

Plant 


3,700.350 38 
62,640.78 
13.292.72 


16,497.48 


126,918.80 


142,416.28 


8,842.766.66 
62,540.78 


Undistributed clearing accounts 




1,495.88 1.49588 


11,706.84 






Total 

1 


3,759,598.44 


15,497.48 


128,414.68 1 143,912.16 


8,008,510.60 



1 Deduct. 

Note.— Differences from previous reports in amounts shown due to diange in method for h*n«i"wg plant 
and undistributed clearing accounts. 



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MONTANA-NOBTH DAKOTA, LOWER YEULOWSTONE PROJECT. 195 
EgtmaUd cost of contemplated vhttI, Sun River project, during fiscal year 1920. 



Principal features. 



Sub- 
feature. 



Principal 
feature. 



Examination and surveys: 

General 

Experimental inyestigations . 



a] system: 

Pishkon Canal 

Sun River Slope Canal 

Greenfields Canal 

Final payment due Great Falls Power Co. 



Lateral system: Greenfields division, first unit (laterals and structures). 

Permanent improvements and land: Fairfield operation headquarters 

Telephone system: Willow Creek cut-off 

Operation and maintenance: 

Water-rental basis 

Public notice 



Total. 



<1,300 
200 



2,000 
10,400 
13,500 
39,000 



24,500 



31,500 
13,000 



SI, 500 



65,400 

24,500 

4,500 

600 



44,500 



141,000 



Operating cost and revenues, Sun River project, to Dec. SI, 1918. 





Calendar year 1918. 


To end of calendar year 1018. 


Features. 


°.Er 


ICainte- 
nance. 


Total 


Opera- 
tion. 


Hainte- 
nance. 


TotiL 


COSTS. 

Storage works, Willow Creek Reser- 
voir 1 


291,026.92 
1,97L84 


$420.03 
4,765.15 


>S606.80 
6,736.99 


13,380.09 
9,315.71 


$1,766.60 
25,821.33 


$5,136.09 
35,137.04 


Canal system: Fort Shaw Main 
Ot»^I--- 




Lateral system: 

Lateral A 


1,16L65 
805.75 

1,106.53 
68L06 


847.75 
1,549.58 
2,407.97 
1,569.74 


1,999.40 
2,355.33 
3,514.50 
2,200.80 


6,962.27 
4,466.37 
6,751.13 
4,214.20 


19,126.96 
14,136.16 
9,248.90 
15,209.72 


26,069.23 
18,602.53 
16,00a03 
19,423.92 


T At^ral C 


Lateral D 


Laterals K and H 




Total lateral system '. 


3,094.99 


6,375.04 


10,070.03 


22,393.97 


67,721.74 


80, 115. 71 






Subtotal 


4,639.91 


11,560.22 


16,200.13 
52.60 


35,089.77 


85,299.67 


120,389.44 
«2,67a90 


Operation and maintenance charges 
transferred to and added to con- 
jftnKtion charses 










Total cost 


i 


16,252.73 






117,710.64 




( 






REVENUES. 

( peratioa and maintenance charges 
accrued on contracts with water- 
rig^t applicants 


1 
1 


17,063.74 

84.39 

141.00 

253.66 
518.86 






81,391.94 
210.20 


Operation and maintenance diarges 
paid in advanct by water-right 
applicants - r - - t 


1 

1 






Operation and maintenance charges 
paid and forfeited by water-right 










1,166.00 


Penalties on operation and mainte- 
nxDfx charges accrued on contracts 
with water-rieht aoDlicants 








383.62 


Rentals of irrigation water 








1, 109. 45 


Other revenues unclassified, earned 
during operating ppriod r r- - - . - 








67.23 


Less discount allowed on operation 
and maintenance charges accrued 
an contracts with water-right ap- 
plicant* --.-,. - . , , 






* 341. 34 
J 737. 22 






2 896.84 


Leas loss on farming operations 










'737.22 














Total revenues .... 


! . 


16,983.09 






82,683.46 


Exoess or deficit 










1 


730.36 






35,027.08 


1 1 







t Deduct. 

> Credit shown Is due to transferring from costs of operation and 
operation and maintenance during construction, portion of costs, $2,( 
for guarding Willow Creek Dam. Actual cost, $(636. 47. 



itenance under public notice to 
I, incurred dining 1917 and 1918 



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MOlSrTAlirA-lirOETH DAKOTA, LOWEE TEIIOWSTOlSrE PROJECT. 

L. H. Mitchell, project manager, Savage, Mont. 
LOCATION. 

Counties: Richland and Dawson, Mont.; McKenzie, N. Dak. 

Townships: 18 to 26 N., Rs. 56 to 60 E., Montana meridian; 150 to 152 N., R. 104 W., 
fifth principal meridian. 

Railroads: Northern Pacific, Great Northern, and Missouri River. 

Railroad stations and estimated population June 30, 1919: Intake, 90; Bums, 25; 
Savage, 325; Crane, 40; Sidney, 1,800; and Fairview, Mont., 1,000; Dore, N. Dak., 30. 

WATER SUPPLY. 

Source of water supply: Yellowstone River. 
Area of draina^ basin: 66,000 sauare miles. 

Annual run-off in acre-feet: Yellowstone River at Intake, Mont., 1918, 12,590,000; 
maximum since 1909, 14,130,000; minimum since 1909, 8,900,000. 

AGRICTJLTTJBAL AND CLIMATIC CONDITIONS. 

Area for which the service is prepared to deliver water, season of 1919: 42,167 acres. 

Area under rental contracts, season of 1919: 31,800 to June 30. 

Length of irrigating season: May 1 to October 10 — 163 days. 

Average elevation of irrigable area: 1,900 feet. 

Rainfall on irriorable area: 13-year average, 15.41 inches; 1918, 13.60 inches. 

Range of temperature on irrigable area: —46° to 110° F. 

Character of soil of irrigable area: Deep sandy loam predominates, some alkali and 
gumbo. 

Principal products: Grain, forage crops, and vegetable. 

Principal markets: Minneapolis, St. Paul, and Duluth, Minn.; local markets con- 
sume forage crops and vegetables. 

LANDS OPBNED FOB IBRIGATION. 

Dates of public notices and orders: December 21, 1908; March 7, March 24, May 1, 
August 23, and November 8, 1911; March 1 and April 30, 1912; February 26, May 28, 
June 23, and July 21, 1913; January 19, March 4, and September 24, 1914: February 
5, March 2, March 17, and March 20, 1915; January 29, March 16, and April 12, 1916; 
March 31, 1919. 

Location of lands opened: Tps. 18 and 19 N., R. 57 E.; Tps. 19 and 20 N., R. 58 E.: 
Tps. 21, 22, 23, 24, and 25 N., R. 59 E.; and T. 24 N., R. 60 E., Montana principal 
meridian; Tps. 150 and 151 N., R. 104 W., fifth principal meridian. 

Limit of area of farm unit: Public, 80 acres; private, 160 acres. 

Dutv of water: 2i acre-feet per acre per annum at the farm. 

Building charge per acre of irrigable land, $42.50 and $45; rental charge for 1919, 
$1 per acre for IJ acre-feet; additional water at the rate of 50 cents per acre-foot. 

Annual operation and maintenance charge: 75 cents per acre for 1 acre-foot; addi- 
tional water at the rate of 50 cents per acre-foot. 

OHRONOLOGICAL ST7KMABY. 

Reconnoissance made and preliminary surveys begun in 1903. 
Construction recommended by board of engineers, April 23, 1904. 
Construction authorized by Secretary, May 10, 1904. 
Lower Yellowstone Dam cornpleted, February 19, 1910. 
First irrigation by Reclamation Service, season of 1909. 
Entire project 87 per cent completed, June 30 

196 



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MONTANA-KOBTH DAKOTA, LOWER YELL0WST02<nB PROJECT. 197 

IBBIOATION PLAN. 

The irrigation plan of the Lower Yellowstone project provides for the diversion of 
water from the Yellowstone River at a point 18 miles below Glendive, Mont., into a 
canal on the west side of the river whicn extends down the valley to the confluence 
of the Yellowstone and Missouri Rivers, conveying water for the irrigation of land 
lying between the canal and the Yellowstone River. The fall of the water which 
will be discharged from tLe main canal into lateral KK at a point 19 miles below 
the headgates will be utilized to operate turbines direct-connected to centrifugal 
^ pumps for raising water to irriffate approximately 3,000 acres of excellent bench land. 

The United States claims au waste, seepage, unappropriated spring, and percolat- 
ing water arising within the project, and proposes to use such water in connection 
therewith. 

The completed features are the Lower Yellowstone Dam and diversion works, the 
main canal for a distance of 66.4 miles, and the complete lateral system in connection 
therewith. 

The features for future construction are the pumping plant, the remaining 5 miles 
of the main canal, and about 52 miles of laterals, which, when completed, will irrigate 
approximately 15,500 acres. 

SUMMABY OF GBNERAL DATA FOR LOWER YELLOWSTONE 
PROJECT TO END OF FISCAL YEAR 1919. 
Areas: 

Irrigable acreage when project is complete 69, 529 

Public land entered to June 30, 1919 15,091 

Public land open to entry on June 30, 1919 91 

Public land withdrawn on June 30, 1919 1,988 

State land unsold June 30, 1919 1, 451 

Railroad land June 30, 1919 97 

Private land June 30, 1919 40,811 

Acreage service could have supplied in season of 1918 42, 232 

Estimated acreage service can supply in season 1919 42, 167 

Estimated acreage service can supply in season 1920 45, 056 

Acreage irrigated season of 1918 21, 075 

Acreage cropped imder irrigation season of 1918 : 21, 000 

Acreage dry-farmed season of 1918 5, 345 

Crops: 

Value of irrigated crops season of 1918 $669,191.00 

Value of irrigated crops per acre cropped 31.86 

Value of dry-farmed crops season of 1918 60, 886. 00 

Value of dry-farmed crops per acre cropped 11. 39 

Finances: 

Net construction cost to June 30, 1919 |2, 893, 498. 75 

Per cent completed on June 30, 1919 87 

Appropriated for fiscal year 1920 $59,000.00 

Estimated per cent complete by June 30, 1920 .' 87 

Proposed appropriation fiscal year 1921 $83, 000 

Estimated per cent complete by June 30, 1921 87 

Annoimced construction charges per acre $42. 50 and $45. 00 

Appropriation fiscal year 1919 55,000.00 

Special appropriation 52, 000. 00 

Increase miscellaneous collections 21, 790. 53 

Increased compensation 3,388.19 

132,178.72 
Expenditures chargeable to 1919 appropriation: 

Disbursements $76, 083. 42 

Transfers 5, 781. 54 

Current liabilities 8,547.07 

90,412.03 

Unencumbered balance on July 1, 1919 41,766.69 



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198 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL BEPORT OF RECLAMATION SBRVICB. 

Repayments: 

Value of construction water-right contracts |1, 243,428.90 

Construction charges: 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 74,146.84 

CoUected to June 30, 1919 10,044.75 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 64,102.09 

Operation and maintenance charges (public notice): 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 138,467.80 

Collected to June 30, 1919 36,835.83 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 102,631.97 

Water-rental charges: 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 87,205.19 

Collected to June 30, 1919 83,896.01 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 3,309.18 

Drainage: 

Estimated acreage damaged by seepage to June 30, 1919 1, 500 

Miles of drains buUt to June 30, 1919-- 

Open 4.5 

, Closed 1.1 

5.6 

Estimated acreage protected by drains to Jime 30, 1919 1, 600 

Estimated acreage to be protected by authorized system 1, 600 

Cost of drainage works to June 30, 1919 $77, 266. 14 

SBBPAOB AND DBAINAaS. 

No drains were constructed during the year. The completed 
portion of Drain No. 1 has drained the seeped area along both sides, 
and satisfactory crops are being raised. The total seeped area on 
the project has not changed materially since 1914. 

The areas exempted from water charges because of seepage for 
the past five years are as follows: 1914, 1,276 acres; 1915, 1,239 
acres; 1916, 1,247 acres; 1917, 1,360 acres; 1918, 1,485 acres. 

OPERATION AND MAINTENANOB. 

During the season of 1918 water was delivered to 370 farms with an 
irrigable area of 30,790 acres, and 21,075 acres were irrigated. This 
was 30 per cent more than was irrigated in any previous year. The 
dry weather of May and June, 1918, continued to the last week of 
July and caused a near failure of dry-land crops. Under the ditch 
the most energetic measures were taken to relieve the situation, 
although the canal system was inadequate to supply water to all 
farmers immediately upon request. The peak load was maintained 
up to July 12, when the lower bank at mile 12 suddenly sloughed off 
and cracked almost to the water edge. For the next 10 days the 
flow was held at 425 second-feet and on July 23 the supply had caught 
up with the demand. The theoretical capacity of the main canal 
with a gauge reading of 9 is computed to be 673 second-feet, showing 
a loss of ?00 second-feet in carrying capacity at this stage or 30 per 
cent. This is due to silt deposits, growth of willows, and other im- 
pediments in the canal section. 

The canal mileage operated was also greater than in any previous 
year. Only 8 per cent of the available canals are now idle and these 
are mostly small laterals that extend to imimproved lands. Tlie 



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MONTANA-NOBTH DAKOTA, LOWER YELLOWSTONE PROJECT. 199 



main canal is operated each year for its entire length of 66 miles: 120 
mUes of laterals were in use the past season and 5 J miles of deep land 
ilrains were in operation. Although only 54 per cent of the land for 
which water was available was irrigated, it was necessary to operate 
"92 per cent of the available canals. 

Settlement and cracking took place in the canal bank from mile 19 
to 19.6 during the period of maximum flow. Because of the marsh 
extending along the canal in this vicinity, the lower bank has re- 
mained unstable and some movement has taken place each year that 
the canal was operated. This stretch of canal has been the most 
important feature in considering a safe load and for the past two 
seasons required a night patrolman. Some repairs were made here 
in December by reinforcing the lower bank for a distance of 200 feet. 

A heavy rain that began at noon on August 15 and reached the 
proportions of a cloudburst extended along the valley from Savage 
to Fairview. The heaviest downpour appears to have taken place m 
the uplands just above the main canal. The rainfall at Savage was 
1.65 mches in 40 minutes and 6 inches of rainfall were reported at 
Sidney. Surface water structures along the main canal were unable 
to take care of the run-off and in a number of places the water flowed 
over the upper canal bank, filled the canal to a depth of several feet 
above normal, and in flowing over the lower bank caused three 
serious breaks which could not be repaired in time to permit further 
water delivery for the season. Minor damage occurred at numerous 
places where the canal banks were overtopped or structures were 
unable to take care of the flood. 

Due to the scarcity of laborers and the epidemic of influenza, it 
was not possible to complete the repair work on these breaks in time 
to make deliveries in the operating season of 1919 until Jime 2. 

Historical review. Lower YeUowsUme project. 



Item. 



1914 


1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 


36,250 


42,300 


42,288 


42,288 


42,232 


6,743 


12,656 


6,020 


15,744 


21,075 


151 


163 


151 


180 


186 


25,769 


40,141 


27,181 


60,205 


51,445 


9,143 
1.59 


17,970 
1.42 


7,645 
1.25 


27,842 


23,321 


1.77 


1.11 



U919 



Acreage for which service was prepared to 

supply water 

Acreage irrigated 

Miles of canals opera ted 

Water diverted (acre-feet) 

Water delivered to land (acre-feet) 

Per acre of land irrigated (acre-feet) 



42,167 

9,020 

169 

16,700 

7.600 

0.83 



1 To June 30. 
SBTTUBMENT. 

Experience with crops without irrigation makes irrigation more 
popular and the development of the Lower Yellowstone project much 
faster. The population of the project, exclusive of the towns, has 
increased materially and the following comparisons showing the 
development since 1914 are evidence that the success of the project 
is assured. 





Popolation 

on Irrigated 

farms. 


Number 
per farm. 


Owners on 

irrigated 

farms. 


1914 


732 
1,220 


2.0 
2.8 


140 


1918 


196 







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200 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPOBT OE BEGLAMATION SEBVIGB. 



During the year the following changes in ownership were made as 
compared with the changes in 1917: 




Transfers of land In private ownership.. 

Assi^qunents 

Relinq uiafaments 

Homestead entries 



Settkment dataj Lower Yellowstone project. 



Item. 



Total number of irrigable farms on project. . 

Population 

Number of irrigated farms 

Irrigable farms operated by owners 

Irrigable forms operated by tenants 

Irrigable farms having neither owner nor ten- 
ant livixig thereon 

Num ber 01 1 owns 

Population 

Total population in towns and on farms 

Number of public schools 

Kumber of churches 

Number of banks 

Total capital stock of banks 

Amount of deposits 

Number of depositors 



1915» 



191fl» 



514 
821 
260 
1«8 
62 

150 

8 

2,145 

2,966 

19 

5 

9 

$230,000 

1906,000 

3,838 



514 
821 
260 
168 
62 

159 

8 

2,145 

2,966 

19 

5 

9 

1230,000 

<1, 388, 000 

6,637 



19171 



514 
978 
323 
195 
52 

162 

8 

3,310 

4,288 

1! 

10 I 
1330,000 I 
$2,352,000 i 
6,390 



19181 



514 

1,220 

370 

200 

76 

165 

8 

3,500 

4,620 

19 

8 

10 

$300,000 

$2,000,000 

7,000 



1919 « 



514 

1,S0» 

320 

65 

15S 

8 

8,500 

4,800 

*13 

» 

10 

$402,000 

$2,365,000 

7,500 



> Project on rental basis. 

> Project on rental basis; estimated to Jime 30. 

I Decrease in number of schools due to consolidation. 

PBINOIPAL CBOPS. 

Alfalfa has been the principal crop for the past three vears, although 
the increase in acreage for 1918 was the least of record. The call wr 
foodstuffs during the war led to a decided increase in wheat produc- 
tion imder the cutch, which was a factor in keeping down the alfalfa 
acreage. About 1,300 acres of alfalfa were abandoned in the sprii^ 
of 1918 as a result of winter killing or plans for crop rotation, but this 
was more than offset by the seeding of 1,900 acres to new alfalfa. 
The following tabulation shows the increase since the year 1912: 



Year. 


Alfalfa 
acrtago. 


Increase. Year. 


Alfalfa 
acreage. 


Inorease. 


1912 


1,284 
2,380 
4,184 
6,055 


PereetU. \\ 
1916 


6,962 
8 693 
9,250 


Percent. 
15 


1913 


85 ) 1917 


23 


1914 


76 ' 1918 


t 


1915 


46 ' 









The average yield of alfalfa for 1918 was 2.1 tons per acre and the 
average price was $16 in the stack up to the end of the year; $20 in 
the stack was realized in some cases, but the mild winter caused some 
decline in prices later in the feeding season. Alfalfa was baled and 
delivered on the {>roject from distant points at $21 to $23 per ton. 

Wheat production increased from 52,000 bushels in 1917 to 106,000 
in 1918. The guaranteed price of $2 per bushel made this a very 



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MONTANA-NORTH DAKOTA, LOWER YELLOWSTONE PROJECT. 201 

profitable crop with an average return of $27.26 per acre. The 
increase in wheat acreage was principally at the expense of flaxseed, 
which fell from 3,300 acres in 1917 to 1,700 m 1918. The following 
table shows relative areas planted to the principal crops dxuing the 
past six years: 

P«r cent of total crop area represented by selected crops. 



Yew 


Alfalfa. 


Wheat. 


Oats. 


Barley. 


Flax. 


Total. 


1913 


12 
18 
27 
31 
36 
35 


42 
26 
38 
27 
21 
30 


14 
16 
15 
14 
9 
10 


12 
11 
6 
10 
5 
6 


7 
10 

5 

8 
13 

7 


87 


1914 


81 


1916 


91 


1916 


90 


1M7 


84 


1918 


88 







The irrigated crop exceeds the value of dry crop by $20.46 per acre. 
This difference has been very marked the past two years because of 
dry weather, and has led to decreased dry fanning \mder the ditch. 
The difference in value of dry and irrigated crops has been in pro- 
portion to rainfall during the growing season. May to July, inclusive, 
as shown by the following records: 



Year. 


Rainfall. 


Value of 

irrigated 

cropper 

acre. 


Value of 
nonirri- 

gated 
cropper 

acre. 


Differ- 
ence in 
value. 


1913 


Inehet. 
5.67 
8.53 
ia46 
9.78 
3.00 
8.70 


$13.71 
17.33 
16.18 
20.70 
29.35 
81.85 


$7.18 
10.64 
10.30 
18.77 
ia36 
11.39 


$6.53 


1914 


6.69 


1915 : 


5.88 


1916 


1.93 


1917 


18.99 


1918 


20.46 







The cloudburst on August 15 cut down the yield by drowning the 
low areas and later irrigation was prevented by premature ending 
of the irrigation season. The labor situation as regards the susar- 
beet crop was not entirely satisfactory as foreigners were somewnat 
scarce and undependable. The area planted to beets increased from 
307 acres in 1917 to 500 acres in 1918 and 1,300 acres in 1919. The 
average yield the past season was 6.6 tons per acre and the maximum 
was 11 tons. The crop was controlled by the Great Western Sugar 
Co., and shipped to Billings, Mont. 



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202 EIGHTEENTH AKNUAI/ BEPOBT OF BEOLAMATION SBBVIGB. 

Crop report f irrigated lands Latoer YellowtUme project, Montana-North Dakota, year oj 

1918. 





Area 

(acres). 


Unit of 
yield. 


Yields. 


Values. 


Crop. 


Total 


Average 
per acre. 


Per unit 
ofyie«d. 


Total 


Per acre. 


AlfillilEU 


0,920 

1,710 
73 

1,321 
100 
600 
130 
170 

1,053 
130 
029 

3,247 
490 
285 
179 

0,288 
06 

1,296 


Ton 

...do 

Bushel. . 

...do 

...do 

Ton 

Bushel.... 

Ton 

Bushel.... 


14,030 

164 

287 

39,720 

840 

3,310 

4,470 

020 

8,930 


2.1 

.1 

3.9 

22.6 
8.4 
0.0 

82.9 
8.0 
8.6 


$10.00 
10.00 
17.00 
.90 
7.00 
9.30 
1.30 
11.00 
3.30 


S234,O80 

2,404 

4,879 

26,748 

6,880 

30,783 

6,811 

0,R30 

29,430 

11,995 

10,850 

67,700 

0,856 

30,880 

1,010 

199,600 

0,780 


SS3.83 


AiMl%,new 


1.44 


AUbl&'seed 


00.83 


Bariey 


30.36 


BfH^ns - 


68.80 


"Rflftff, sugar 


01.67 


Com. ...r. 


43.73 




40.13 


Flaxseed 


37.98 


Garden 


02.37 


Hay 


Ton 

Bushel.... 


776 
73,200 


1.2 
32.1 


14.66 
.80 


17.36 


oafa.:::::::::::::: : :::: 


3S.70 


i^ashire. ••..■.■■..■.•......^ 


13.99 


Potatoes 


BudMd.... 

...do 

...do 

...do 


36,840 

1,160 

00,280 


126.8 
0.4 
16.8 


.76 
1.40 
2.00 


94.35 


Rye 


&99 


in/Sit.::::::::::;:;:::::::: 


31.74 


Miscellanoouff 


104.43 


Less duplicated areas 






Total cropped 


21,000 

35 
60 


Total and average 




009,191 


3L80 








Areas. 


Acres. 


Farms. 


Percent 

of 
project.1 


Inlnted, no crop: 


Total irrigable area fturms reported. 
Total irrigated area fturms reported 
Under water-richt aDDlicAtian^. 


30,790 

21,076 

1 

21 074 


370 
370 
1 
309 
370 


78 


Stubble 


54 








Under rental cantracCs 




64 


Total irrigated acreage. 


21,075 


Total cropped area farms reported. 


241702 


03 



1 Based on present irrigable area. 

Crop report, nonirrigated lands. Lower Yellowstone project, MontanorNorth Dakota, 

year of 1918. 





Area 
(acres). 


Unit of 
yield. 


Yields. 


Values. 


. Crop. 


Total 


Average 
per acre. 


Per unit 
of yield. 


Total. 


Per acre. 


Alfclfc 


419 

210 

151 

302 

5 

23 

47 

159 

605 

17 

868 

420 

286 

48 

215 

1,554 

51 

96 


Ton 

...do 


407 


1.1 


$10.00 


$7,472 


$17. 8i 


Alfalfa, new 




Alfalfaseed 


Bushel.... 

...do 

...do 

Ton 

Bushel.... 

Ton 

Bushel.... 


340 

2,680 

25 

230 

100 

275 

1,790 


2.2 
&9 
5.0 
10.0 
2.1 
1.7 
2.7 


17.00 
.90 
7.00 
9.30 
1.30 

11.00 
3.30 


6,780 
3,413 

175 
3,139 

130 
3,025 
6,907 

805 
8,442 
3,980 
2,442 
2,490 

938 
14,208 

625 


38.27 


Barley 


7.99 


Beans 


35.00 


Beets, sugar 


98.00 


Com 


2.77 


Com fodder 


19.03 


Flaxseed 


a88 


Garden 


60.90 


Hay 


Ton 

Bushel.... 


603 
4,920 


.7 
11.7 


14.00 
.80 


9.73 


Oats 


9.87 


Pasture 


8.54 


Potatoes 


Bushel.... 

...do 

...do 

...do 


3,320 

070 

7,104 


09.2 
3.1 
4.0 


.75 
1.40 
2.00 


61 88 


Rye 


4.30 


Wheat 


9.14 




10.30 


Less duplicated areas 


























Total cropped acreage. 


6,346 










00,880 


1L89 















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MONTANA-NORTH DAKOTA, LOWER YELLOWSTONE PROJECT. 203 
FU^LIO NOTIOB8 AND OBDBB8. 
ORDER, MARCH 31, 1919. 

1. Operation and maintenance charges for 1919. — ^In pursuance of 
section 4 of the reclamation act of June 17, 1902 (32 Stat., 388), 
and acts amendatory thereof and supplementary thereto, particu- 
larly the reclamation extension act of August 13, 1914 (38 Stat., 
686), announcement is hereby made that water will be furnished 
•during the irrigation season of 1919 to any of the lands of the Lower 
Yellowstone project, Montana-North Dakota, for which irrigation 
works haye been completed, including those under water-right appli- 
<;ations and those receiying water on a rental basis, at the rate of 
tl per acre, which will entitle the water user to 1.5 acre-feet of water 
per acre. Additional water may, if required for the proper irrigation 
of the land, be obtained at the rate of 50 cents per acre-foot. All 
•charges for water deliyered in the season of 1919 shall become due 
March 1, 1920, and shall be subject to the same discoxmts and penal- 
ties as described in section 6 of the act of Aupist 13, 1914 (38 Stat.. 
686). No water shall be furnished to any land in 1919 imtil full 
payment has been made of any delinquent charges on account of 
«uch land for preceding years on applications heretofore made with 
any interest due thereon. 

2. Contracts with irrigation districts contemplated. — Steps are now 
being taken by the water users for the organization of two irriga- 
tion districts to include all irrigable lands of the Lower Yellowstone 
project, one of which will include the portion of the irrigable lands 
situated in Montana and one those situated in North Dakota. The 
completion of the organization of these districts and the execution 
of contracts between the districts and the United States may not 
be accomplished before the beginning of the irrigation season of 
1919, for which reason this order is issued and is to be effectiye untU - 
the irrigation districts are organized and contracts between the dis- 
tricts and the United States are executed and approyed, and in any 
eyent, shall be effectiye only for the irrigation season of 1919. 

John W. BLvllowell, 
Assistant to the Secretary of the Interior. 

FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

Condensed balance sheet, Lower Yellowstone project, June 30, 1919, 

Cash $1,367.18 

Inventory of materials and supplies 1,^7.88 

Accounts receivable: 

Corrent amounts due $3,378.88 

Water right charges suspended 166,734.06 

Water right charges unaccrued 1,169,2S2.06 

^ * — 1,339,395.00 

Gross construction cost 2,915,0ft). 43 

Less construction revenue earnings 21,591.68 

Net construction cost 2,893,498.75 

Gross operation and maintenance cost 651,048.54 

Less operation and maintenance revenue earnings 98,861.43 

. 552,187.11 

Accounts pavable 49,768.42 

Continjnmt obligations 1,367.18 

CoUeotions and contracts of specific amounts for repayments to reclamation fund 1, 414, 703. 09 

Miscellaneous accruals 2,781.10 

Capital investment: 

Disbursement, transfer, and Joint construction vouchers received $3, 577, 571. 06 

Collection, transfer, refund, and joint construction vouchers issued 258,244.03 

Net investment 3,ai»,336.18 

Digitized by VjOOQIC 



204 EIGHTEENTH ANKTJAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SEEVIGB. 
Feature cmU of Lower Yellowstone project. 



Principal feature. 


Fiscal 3rear 
1919. 


Total to June 
30, 1919. 


E.xaminatlon and surveys 




$66,006.64 


Canal s-strm: 

I'iverslcn r>am 


$2,807.81 


334,48$. 07 


Main Canal: 

H''adworks 


79,533.66 


to mile 7.6 




355,381.79 


7.6 to mile 15.9 




353,138.68 


15.9 to mile W.6 ; 




282,687.61 


24 5 to mile 33.6 




119,504.45 


I ivisions 5, 6, 7 




219,536.50 


Stnir tures 




539,138.44 


H i'^hwar bridges and approaches 




77,850.17 


Ri^ht of way 


30.25 


17,376.28 


Miijellaneous 


38,036.38 








Total for canal system 


2,347.06 


2,416,677.03 






Lateral system 




290,060.8^ 


DrRina.''e "J 'stc»m and mf aspiring device? 


»53.48 


77,286.14 


Farm units and surveys 


1,016.21 


Permanent improvements and laxid 




39,536.3» 


Telephone s 'st m 




22,818.22 


Operation and maint' nance charges transferred to and oqmpounded with 
construction charges 




1,700.05 








Gross construction cost June 30, 1919 




2,915,00a43^ 


Less roven les -^am>d during construction period: 

Rentals of buUdings $422.00 






Rentals of t Irphraes and tolls 4, 331. 04 




Contractors' fr ight refunds 21,261.33 




IjOss on messhouse operations ^ 4| 422. 69 






21,591.68 








2,293.58 


2,893,498.75 



I Deduct. 



Statement ofcostSy by calendar years. Lower Yellowstone project. 





Construction. 


Ox>eration and maintenance. 






Under 
public 
notice. 


Water 
rentals. 


Total. 


Total cost. 


Year ending Dec. 31— 

1904 


$35,237.74 

154,318.40 

396,619.33 

1,015,975.33 

919,876.95 

200,754.90 

40,775.64 

9 132.04 

3,897.73 

65,154.83 

37,015.03 

14,180.56 

10,659.94 

9,081.88 

208.56 

2,301.67 








$35,237.74 


1905 








154,318.40 
396,619.33 


1906 








1907 








1,016,975.33 
919,876.96 


1908 








• 1909 


$109,192.21 
51,124.14 
68,140.91 
128,399.74 
36,566.74 
5,703.72 




$i69,i92.2i 
51,124.14 
68,140.91 
128,399.74 
36,568.74 
26,699.88 
27,900.80 
24,886.16 
32,4n.78 
74,998.75 
43,707.40 


309,947.11 
91,899.78 
77,272.95 
132,297.47 
101,72L67 
63,714.91 


1910 




1911 




1912 




1913 


'$26,*996.'i6* 
27,900.80 
24,886.16 
32,411.78 
74,998.75 
43,707.40 


1914 


1915 


42,08L36 
36,446.10 
41,493.66 


1916 




1917 




1918 




75,207.31 
46,006.97 


January to June 30, 1919 








Subtotal 


2,915,090.43 


399,127.46 


224,901.05 

25,547.31 

1,472.72 


624,028.61 

25,547.81 

1,472.72 


3,539,118.04 
25,647.31 


Plant accounts 


Undistributed clearing account 






. 1,472.72 








Total 


2,915,090.43 


399,127.46 


251,92L08 


651,048.64 


3,666,138.07 





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MONTANA-NOBTH DAKOTA, LOWEB YEIXOWSTONB PROJECT* 205 
StaUment ofcotts, by fiscal years, Lower YdlowsUme project. 



Year ending June 30— 

1908 

1W7 

190e 

WW 

1910 

1911 

1912 

1913 

1914 

1916 

1916 

1917 .•. 

1918 

1919 



Subtotal 

Plant account cm June 3(\ 1919... 
Undistributed clearing accounts. 



T6tal.. 



Constructioo. 



$294,910.59 

«19,5G9.88 

978,590.28 

701,342.76 

166,404.76 

10,847.88 

1,024.98 

13,288.54 

69,984.50 

36,657.00 

591.31 

19,411.12 

167.25 

2,293.58 



2, 915, 09a 43 



Operation and maintenance. 



Under 
pubUo 
notice. 



$61,060.95 
84,490.87 
50,436.92 

122,486.08 
71,520.75 
19,111.89 



399,127.46 



2,915,09a 43 



399,127.46 



Water 
rental. 



$11,601.01 
21,327 09 
29,965.81 
24,494.88 
4Q,213.37 
88,298 89 



224,901.05 

25,547.31 

1,472.72 



251,921.08 



Total. 



Total cost. 



$51,080.95 
84,490.87 
50,436.92 I 

122,486.08 I 
71,520.75 
30,712.90 I 
21,327.0^ 
29,965.81 
21,494.88 
49,213 37 
88,2Q8.8d 



624,028.51 

25,547.31 

1,472.72 



651,048.54 



$294,916.59 
610,569.88 
978,.50a28 
752,423 71 
250,896.63 
61,284.80 
123,511.06 
84,800.29 
100,697.40 
57,984.09 
39,557.12 
43,<J06.00 
49,380.62 
90,592.47 



3,539,118.94 

25,547.31 

1,472.72 



3,566,138.97 



Estimated cost of contemplated vhttJc, Lower Yellowstone project, during fiscal year 1920, 



Principal features. 



Estimated 
cost. 



Operation and maintenance imder water rental. 
Reimbursable accounts 

Total 



$57,700 
1,300 



59,000 



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206 EIGHTEENTH AKNUAI/ BEPORT OF BEOLAMATION SERVICE. 
Operating ooits and revenues, Lower Yellowstone projed, to Dee. SI, 1918. 





Calendar year 1018. 


To Deo. 81, 1018. 




°^ 


Mainte- 
nance. 


Total. 


Opera- 
tion. 


Mainte- 
nance. 


TotaL 


COSTS. 

Canal syston— Main canal 


$1,522.23 
2,480.61 


812,164.72 

8,307.67 

148.00 


$13,686.06 

10,878.18 

148.00 


834,290.83 
26,74L55 


1156.001.28 

126,882.84 

164.40 


$180, 202. U 

153, 624. 3» 

164. 4(K 


Lateral system 


Drainage^RysteTn 










Undlstiibnted expenses: 

Maintenance -of permanent Im- 
provements 




1,131.16 

1,13L00 

4,007.32 

12,042.34 


1,131.16 
1,13L00 
4,007.32 
12,042.34 




1,488.41 
57,513.82 

0,536.70 
22,120.60 
10,872.52 

13,087.33 


1,488.41 
57,513.8^ 

0,536.7^ 
22,120.6D> 
10,872. 5» 

13,067.33 


Camp vn^ntenance 






SiiperlQtenfienr^ and accounts. 






General expense 






Telephone mainteimnoe 






Farm operation and mainte- 
nance 


' 
























20,202.81 
5,772.07 


20,202.81 
5,772.07 




115,510.47 
00,110.05 


115,510.47 


Diversion dam at intake 







00,110.06- 










Repairs dne to doad-burst of Aug. 
•&W«pl««n»t. 




18,878.27 

4,410.60 

37.5.33 

340.30 

207.24 


18,878.27 

4,410.60 

875.33 

340.30 

207.24 




18,878.27 

4,410.60 

875.33 

340.30 

207.24 


18,878.27 

4,410.efr 

375.33^ 


Concrete structures 






Wooden structures .". . . 






Riprap replacement 






340.30 


T>i^TnAg^ claims paid , . , 






207.24 










Subtotal 


4,002.84 


70,005.01 


74,008.76 


61,032.38 


520,088.78 


582,021.16 
11,700.06 


Operation and maintenance charges 
added to construction charges 














Total 












580,82LU 














BEVENtTXS. 

Operation and maintenance charges 
accrued on contracts with water- 
ri^ht applicants 






410.75 






138,468.80- 


Operation and maintenance charges 
paid in advance by water-right 
appli'^ants 










622.21 


Operation and maintenance charges 
Ibrfeited bv water-rii^ht appli'^'ants. 












440.00' 


Penalties on operation and mainte- 
nance charges accrued on contracts 
with water-riTht appll'-ants 












2.90- 


Rentals of buildings during oper- 
^f in? pAnnd . . 






372.00 
18,793.91 






7,388.5* 
86,240.25. 

400. or 


Rentals'of Irrl^tion water 










Rentals of telephone and t^ls dur- 
ini; operating period 










Other revenues undassifled, earned 
durini; operating period 






688.38 






1.435.31 
4.63 


Less discount allowed on operation 
and maintenance charges accnied 
on contracts with water-right ap- 
pllcftnts . , . 
























Total 






20,265.04 






235, 102. 0» 














Difference, deficit 






54,733.71 






345,210.02 













1 Deduct. 



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VEBBASKA-WTOHIVG, VOBTH PLATTE PBOJECT. 

Andrbw Weiss, project manager, Mitchell, Nebr. 
LOCATION. 

Counties: Sioux, Scotts Bluff, Banner, and Morrill, Nebr.; Natrona, Carbon, Con- 
verse, Goehen, and Platte, Wyo. 

Townships: 19 to 27 N., Ks. 48 to 67 W.; 26 to 30 N., Rs. 83 to 85 W., sixth principal 
meridian. 

Railroads: Chicago, Burlington & Quincy; Union Pacific; Chicago & North Western; 
Colorado & Southern. 

Railroad stations and estimated population, June 90, 1919: Bridgeport, 1,200; 
Bayard, 1,800; Minatare, 600; Scottsbluff, 6,000; Mitchell, 1,100; Morrill, 800; Henry, 
100; McGrew, 100; Melbeta, 100; Gering, 2,500; and Haig, Nebr., 100; Tornngton, 1,000; 
lingle, 150; Fort Laramie, 60; Guernsey, 400; and Caspar, Wyo., 12,000. 

WATBB SUPPLY. 

Source of water supply: North Platte River. 

Area of drainage basin: 12,000 square miles. 

Annual run-off in acre-feet of North Platte River: At Pathfinder, Wyo. (12,000 
square miles), 1906 to 1918, maximuTn, 2,420,000; minimum, 870,000; mean, 1.481,000. 
At Whalen, Wyo. (16,200 square miles), 1900 to 1918, maximum, 2,690,000; minimum; 
983,000; mean, 1,643,000. 

AGBICTJLTTTBAL AND OLUCATIO CONDITIONS. 

INTERSTATE UNIT. 

Area for which the service is prepared to supply water, season of 1919, 129,715 acres. 

Area under water-right applications and rented contracts, season of 1918, 105,350 
acres. 

Length of irrigating season: From April 1 to September 30 — 183 days. 

Average elevation of irrigable area: 4,100 feet above sea level. 

Rainfall on irrigable area: 9 years average 14.7 inches; 1918, 19.98 inches. 

Range of temperature on irrigable area:--30*' to 104^ F. 

Character of soil of irrigable area: Sandy loam. 

Principal products: Alfalfa, cereals, corn, sugar beets, and potatoes. 

Principal markets: Omaha, Nebr.; Ksmsas City and St. Joseph, Mo.; Denver, Colo.; 
central Wyoming. 

FORT LARAMIE UNIT. 

Area for which the service is prepared to supply water, season of 1919, 12,132 acres. 
Area under rental contracts, season of 1919, 4,865 acres. 

LANDS OPENED TO IBBIGATION. 

INTERSTATE UNIT. 

Dates of public notices and orders: July 29, 1907; May 29, June 16, November 12, 
1908; March 3, March 27, June 2, 1909; March 12, April 4, June 6, June 25, July 2, 
September 10, 1910; March 7, March 24, April 21, December 30, 1911; M.arch 13, 
March 14. March 19, May 23, June 24, September 5, 1912; February 5, March 11 (2), 
March 29, June 16, June 23, July 13. September 4, 1913; September 24, 1914; February 
27, April 23, 1915; January 13, February 10. February 24, March 16, May 16, 1916; 
March 16, March 22, 1917; April 3, 1918; March 11, 1919. 

Location of lands opened: Ts. 21 to 26 N., Rs. 51 to 65 W., sixth principal meridian. 

Limit of area of farm units: Public, 80 acres; private, 160 acres. 

Duty of water: Two and one-half acre-feet per acre per annum at the farm. 

207 

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208 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL BEPOET OF RECLAMATION SERVICE, 

Charges per acre of irrigable land: Building, $45 and $55; annual operation and 
maintenance, 65 cents per acre-foot for water used prior to June 20 and after August 
31; $1.30 per acre-foot tor water used subsequent to June 20 and before September 1, 
with a minimum charge of $1.70 per acre. 

FOBT T.ABAinjt UNIT. 

Date of public order: March 12, 1918. 

Location of lands opened: No lands opened. 

Charges for rental water, 40 cents per acre-foot delivered at farm. 

CHBONOLOGICAL STJHMABY. 

Reconnoissance made and preliminary surveys begun in 1902. 

Construction recommendea by director March 7, 1903. 

Construction conditionally authorized by Secretary March 14, 1903. 

First irrigation by Reclamation Service, season of 1908. 

Whalen Diversion Dam completed February, 1909. 

Pathfinder Dam completed June, 1909. 

Pathfinder Dike completed May, 1911. 

Interstate Canal, 165 fiiiles completed June 30, 1914. 

Contract for construction of Northport district executed February 24, 1919. 

Pathfinder unit, 99.1 per cent completed June 30, 1919. 

Interstate unit, 96.3 per cent completed June 30, 1919. 

Fort Laramie unit, 3z per cent completed June 30, 1919. 

Northport district, 6 per cent completed June 30, 1919. 

IBBIGATION PLAN. 

The irrigation plan of the North Platte project provides for the storage of flood waters 
of North Platte Kiver in a reservoir controlled by the Pathfinder Dam, about 3 miles 
below the junction of the North Platte and Sweetwater Rivers and 50 miles southwest 
of Casper, Wyo., and in smaller reservoirs along the canal lines; and the diversion 
of water from North Platte River by a dam near Whalen, Wyo., into the Interstate 
Canal, supplying water for lands' on the north side of the nver and into the Fort 
Laramie Canal, watering lands on the south side of the river. The United States 
claims all waste, seepage, spring, and percolating water arising within the project and 
proposes to use such water in connection therewith. 

The completed features are: Pathfinder Reservoir; Whalen Diversion Dam; the 
first three divisions of the Interstate Canal; lateral sytems of district 1, 2, and 3 of 
the Interstate Canal system; Reservoir No. 1, known as Lake Alice; Reservoir No. 3, 
known as Lake Minatare. The Fort Laramie Canal system, covering approximately 
100,000 acres, and the Northport Canal system, coveriSig approximately 15,000 acres, 
are now under construction. 

STJHMABY OF GENEBAL DATA FOB NOBTH PLATTE PBOJECT TO 
END OF FISCAL YEAB 1919. 





Interstate. 


Fort Laramie. 


Northport. 


Total. 


Areas:! 

Public land entered to June 30, 1919 

Public land withdrawn on June 30, 1919. . . . 
State land unsold June 30, 1919 


82,432 

610 

2,309 

44,364 


25,700 

34,500 

8,200 

38,600 


6,500 

600 

1,400 

6,600 


114,632 
35,610 
11,909 
89,564 


Private land June 30, 19ltf 




Acreage servloe ooulcl have supplied In 
season of 1918 .^77 


129,716 
129,778 

129, ns 

129,715 
97,908 

94,446 


107,000 

12,132 

12,132 

20,000 
4,865 

4,865 


15,000 


251, ns 

141,910 

141,847 

152,215 
102,773 

90,310 


Estimated acreage service can supply In 
season of 1919?: :........ 




Estimated acreage service can supply in 
season of 1920?: :........ 


2,600 


Acreage Imgated season of 1918 


Acreage cropped under irrigation season of 
1918 









i Including lands of North Platte Canal dc Colonlxatioo Co. on interstate unit. 



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NEBRASKA-WYOMIKG, NOBTH PLATTE PBOJBOT. 209 

Summary of general data for North Platte project to end of fiscal year 1919— Contd. 





Interstate. 


Fort Laramie. 


Northport. 


Total. 


Crop8:t 

vahie of Irrigated crops s»caMm of 1918 

Value of irrigated crops per acre cropped. . . 


$3,100,710.00 
$36.35 


$61,815.00 
$12.71 




$3,162,525.00 








Pinimces: 

Net constnictlon cost to June 30. 1919 

Per cent completed on Jime 30, 1919 

Appropriateo for fiscal year 1920 


$6,117,412.34 

96.3 

« $336,000.00 

97.0 

$824,000 

$55.00 


$4,232,518.75 

32.0 

$437,500.00 

37.0 
$444,000 


$199,164.79 

$106,500.60 

W.0 
$282,000 


$10,549,005.88 

62 

$880,000.00 


1920 


66 


Proposed appropriation fiscal year 1921 

Announoea construction charges per acre. . . 


$1,000,000 




. . 




Appropriation fiscal year 1919 


■ 






$881,000.00 


Increase nnder 10 per cent provision 








88,100.00 


Increase mlso^laneous collMrtions 








80,162.68 


Balance 1918 aDDronriatlon 








33,120.23 


Increaw of ciTipensatlOTi- .....,., r ,, r ,,, ^ - - 








39,104.22 


Special appropr^tJ on 








21,275.67 












Total . 








1,092,762.80 










Pisbursements » 








813,219.15 


Transfers 








85,881.64 


Currant liabilities 








71.540.75 


Contlnsont liabilities 




* 




1,429.60 













Total encumbrance 








972,071.14 












TTnen<*nnibered balance mi Jnly i, 1919 








120,691.66 


Bepayments: 

Value of ocnstruction water right con- 
tracts 


6,808,190.60 

950,827.56 
882,016.11 






6,803,190.50 
960,827.56 


Construction charges- 
Accrued to June 30. 1919 






CoUectod to June 86, 19W. 






•832; 916. 11 








Uncollected on June 30, 1919 


117,411.45 






117,411.45 








Operation and maintenance charges 
(public notices- 
Accrued to June 30, 1919 


816,047.84 
748,742.83 






816,047.84 


Collected to June 36. 1919 






« 748. 742. 38 










Uncollected on June 30. 1919 


67,305.51 






67,305.51 








Water rental charges- 
Accrued to June 30 1919 . ... 


36,652.87 
35,570.62 






86.652.37 
35,570.62 


Collected to June 36. 1919 












Uncollected on June 30. 1919 


1,081.75 






1,081.75 






* 


Drainage: 

Estimated acreage damaged by seepage to 
June 30, 1919 


3.250 

88.7 
14.2 

6,780 

7,960 
$316,244.12 






8,250 


Miles of dj-ains built to June 30, 1919- 
Open . . . 


2:03 




40.73 


Closed ..."!..! 




14.2 


Estimated acreage protected by drains to 
June 30, 1919 






6,780 


Estimated acnMwe to be protected by 
authorized system 


17,000 
$10,255.82 




24,960 


Cost of drainage works to June 30, 1919 




$326,499.94 







i Excluding lands of North Platte Canal & Colonltation Co. on interstate unit. 
> Include $5G.000 for work on storaee unit. 

• Includes $3,121.07 credit for existing works taken up on lokit construction vouchers. 

* Includes $9,199.41 credit for existing worl^ taken up on Johit c<mstruction vouchers. 



138564—1^ 



-14 



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210 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL KEPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 
CONSTBirCTION DTTBING FISCAL YEAB. 
INTERSTATE UNIT. 

A few small lateral extensions were built on various parts of the 
project. 

The Spottedtail diversion channel was begun and completed. 

Two headgates were installed in the Interstate Canal for the use of 
the Lingle Water Users* Association. 

A permanent mess house was built at the Sheep Creek operation 
and maintenance camp, k-barn at Lake Alice Camp, and two bunk 
houses at Camp No. 7. 

The Mitchell office building was enlarged bj the addition of a 
second stoiy over the entire building and extension on each side. 

FORT LARAMIE UNIT. 

MainCanal. — ^The.following work on the Main Canal was completed 
during the year: . 

On division. 5, station 2280 to 3260, which includes the Springer 
Cut , all excavation under specifications No. 357 was completed by 
contract forces during J'anuary, 1919. One siphon, one wasteway, 
two culverts, and two bridges on this division were also completed 
by contract forces under the same s'pecifications in February, 1919. 

On division 6, station 3260 to 3570 (Horse Creek), all earthwork 
excavation was completed in October, 1918, by contract forces 
under specifications No. 367. No structures in this division have 
been built. With the completion of the excavation on division 6 
it has been possible to carry waste water through the Main Canal to 
Horse Creek. 

On division 7, Horse Creek to Nebraska- Wyoming State line, sta- 
tion 3570 to 4503, the contract teamwork excavation, involving core- 
bank construction and overhaul under specifications No. 377, was 
practically completed at the end of year. The main part of the earth- 
. work excavation on this division will be completed oy electric drag- 
lines operated by Government forces. 

Durmg the year the following Main Canal structures were completed 
by Government forces: Sand trap at mile 0.6; five checks at miles 
17.9, 21.2, 30.1, 33.0, and 36.7; three pipe turnouts and one temporary 
wood flume for wasting water into Horse Creek. Since April 1, 1919, 
final location surveys on the Main Canal in Nebraska have been in 
progress eastward from the State line and 20 miles are now ready for 
construction. Designs for structures on this section are now under 
way. 

Lateral system. — On division 1 laterals the following work was com- 
pleted: Main Cherry Creek lateral excavation was completed by con- 
tract forces on April 15, 1919, under specifications No. 373. Laterals 
4.7 and 5.7, 20.1 and 17.8 extension were also completed by local 
contract forces. All excavation on division 1 laterals is now com- 
plete. This division includes all territory west of the Springer 
Divide. Two concrete siphons were built on Cherry Creek laterid oy 
(jovemment forces, also a number of miscellaneous lateral minor 
structures, which are now complete, to and including lateral 39.7. 

On division 2 laterals (Springer Divide to Nebraska- Wyoming State 



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NEBRASKA-WYOMING^ NORTH PLATTE PROJECT. 2ll 

line), 21 schOTules of earthwork excavation were completed during 
the year by loccd contract forces. On May 1 excavation on the main 
Springer lateral was started by electric dragline No. 1, operated by 
Government forces. Power is furnished by the Lino;le power plant. 
At the end of year a total of 61,500 cubic yards had becMi excavated. 
Location surveys of all main laterals in Wyoming have been com- 
pleted and the Horse Creek lateral has been located extending 10 
miles into Nebraska. No structures have been built on division 2 
laterals, but designs for all major structures are now nearly com- 
pleted. 

Power system, — ^All work on the Lingle power plant was practically 
completed during the fall of 1918, but owing to lack of funds it was 
deemed expedient not to start actual operation of plant for construc- 
tion purpose until spring of 1919. The plant is hydroelectric type, 
of two units, each consisting of a 450-horsepower Trump turbine, 
connected to a 375-kilowatt Allis-Chalmers generator. Efficiency 
tests of the plant proved entirely satisfactory in every respect. 
Water is supplied to turbines from the Fort Laramie Main Canal at 
mile 25.5 through a 54-inch wood-pipe j>enstock, 850 feet long, with 
a total drop of 107 feet. Actual operation of the plant was startod 
May 1, 1919, for supplying power to draglines Nos. 1 and 2 at work 
on the main Springer lateral and Cherry Creek drain, respectively. 

At the end of the fiscal year, 33^ miles of permanent high tension, 
10 miles of temporary high tension, and 31 miles of temporary low 
tension transmission lines had b6en built. Four substations had also 
been erected. 

A complete repair shop for dragline repair work was built at Kiowa 
Camp. 

Three new class 9 J Bucyrus electric drag lines were received during 
Jime, 1919, and are being moved out to their respective working 
locations on the Horse Creek lateral and Main Canal. 

One three-room and one four-room cottage were built by contract 
for the use of operators at the Lingle power plant. 

Telephone system. — ^An independent permanent telephone system 
comprising 84 miles of two-wire circuit has been completed by Gov- 
ernment lorces, serving all camps on the unit. Temporary branch 
lines have also been built to serve the electric drag lines and also the 
wasteways along main canal to facilitate operation and maintenance 
work. 

NORTHPORT DISTRICT. 

Location surveys for the main canal were started in July, 1918, and 
at the end of the year were completed to Upper Dugout Creek, or 
station 900 on the canal line. 

Advertisement No. 384 was issued by the Washington office on 
October 1, 1918, for the construction oi the first 13.1 miles of the 
canal, involving 550,290 cubic yards of excavation. Bids were opened 
on November 2, 1918, and were rejected on account of being too high. 

The designs for 9 main canal culverts, 2 combination structures 
(check, turnout, and bridge), and 4 headgates were approved and 
construction was started by Government forces in January, 1919^ and 
Completed in June. 

The contract between the United States and the Northport irriga- 
tion district for the construction of the district was executed by the 



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212 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SBRVtCB. 

Assistant Secretary of the Interior on February 24, 1919, and provides 
for the expenditure of $1,050,000. 

SEEPAGE AND DBAINAGE. 

INTERSTATE UNIT. 

Surveys and investigations incident to design, location, and con- 
struction of drainage works were continued during the year. These 
investigations include borings over the aflfected areas and areas likely 
to become seeped to determine the subsoil conditions, the elevation, 
and periodic variation of the water table, and other factors bearing 
on the location and construction of draina^ works. 

Ehuring the year 1.03 miles of onen drain were built on the Sheep 
Creek drain, compjleting the open drains on this system. 

Work was continued on the Winters Creek closed drain and 1.04 
miles of tile were laid. 

Work was continued on the Lower Nine Mile open drain and 6.03 
miles of drain were completed during the year. 

Work was begun on the Wild Horse open drain imder a cooperative 
contract with the Farmers' irrigation district, the Alliance irrigation 
district, and the city of Bayard. A new drag line was started at 
work on this drain on July 10, 1918, and during the year 5.80 miles 
of open drain were completed. 

FORT LARAMIE UNIT. 

Work was started on the excavation of the Cherry Creek drain on 
May 8, 1919, the work being done by an electric drag line furnished 
with power from the Lingle power plant; 2.03 miles of open drain 
were completed. 

OPEBATION AND HAINTENANOB. 

INTERSTATE UNrT. 

The system as operated during the present season consists of the 
Pathfinaer Reservoir, the Whalen diversion dam, 95 miles of main 
canal, Lake Alice, 5 miles of Reservoir supply canal. Lake Minatare, 
Winters Creek Lake, 37 miles of high-line canal, 42 miles of low-line 
canal, and 626 miles of laterals. 

In 1918 water te the amount of 204,819 acre-feet was delivered to 
1,310 farms, containing approximately 88,771 acres in crops, exclu- 
sive of the lands of the North Platte Canal & Colonization Co. to 
which 39,384 acre-feet of water were delivered for the irrigation of 
110 farms, containing approximately 9,137 acres in crops. The 
average amoimt of water used upon the land under the Interstate 
unit was 2.31 acre-feet per acre and upon the land of the North Platte 
Canal & Colonization Co. 4.31 acre-feet per acre. The total diversion 
at the Whalen Dam during the irrigation season of 1918 was 482,215 
acre-feet. 

During the first part of the season of 1919, 105,067 acres were 
entitled to water imaer water-right application and 17,837 acres under 
contract with the North Platte Canal & Colonization Co. Of this 
amoxmt approximately 102,457 acres were imder cultivation. 



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NEBRASKA-WYOMirSTG, KORTH PLATTE PROJECT. 



218 



Water was diverted into the Interstate Canal on May 3, 1919, and 
the maximum diversion to Jime 30 was 1 ,660 second-feet. On accoimt 
of the imusually hot and dry weather conditions the demand almost 
immediately became so great that it was necessary to operate on a 
rotation basis, and for that reason very little water was available for 
storage in Lakes Alice and Minatare. 

The storage in Pathfinder Reservoir was 1,107,580 acre-feet on 
July 1, 1918, decreasing to 558,780 acre-feet on October 5, 1918, 
increasing to 928,790 acre-feet on June 2, 1919, and decreasing to 
777,560 acre-feet on June 30, 1919. The highest elevation reached 
was 6.60 feet below the spillway elevation. 

Historical review , Interttate unit, North Platte project. 



Item. 



1914 



1015 



1916 



1917 



1918 



1919 



Acreage for which serrice was prepared to 

supply water 

Acreage irrigated 

Miles of canal operated 

Water delivered to land (acre-feet) 

Per acre of land irrigated (acre^feet) 



iH»,841 

» 67, 700 

662 

« 176.915 

>2.92 



1139,6S4 

178,057 

800 

« 96, 467 

M.38 



1 129,801 

84,206 

800 

> 164.210 
«2.17 



1120,891 

192,553 

805 

« 177,472 

>2.13 



» 129,778 

» 97, 908 

805 

s 201,819 

>2.81 



» 129,716 

» 102,457 

806 



& Includes North Platte Canal & Cokmixation Co. lands. 

> Exclusive of lands under North Platte Canal & Colooisation Co. tract. 

FOET LABAMIE UNrT. 

During the 1918 season 40 miles of main canal and 30 miles of 
laterals were operated. The total canal diversion was 45,740 acre- 
feet, of which 5,037 acre-feet were delivered to the land. 

Water was diverted into the Fort Laramie Canal on April 12, 1919, 
for the pmpose of sluicing sand throudi the sand trap and sluice at 
station 32. Water was carried to the Xingle power plant for testing 
piirposes, the tests beginning on April 16. Deliveries for irrigation 
purposes were begun on May 8 ana were made on demand to Jime 
30, 1919. Water is being delivered during the season of 1919 on a 
rental basis only. About 6,000 acres of vacant irrigable land were 
leased for farming purposes to Geo. E. Abbott et al. for a period of 
two years beginning March 1, 1919. The lateral system was operated 
for the 1919 season to ana including lateral 41.8, and water for 
seasoning pxuposes has been carried m the Fort Laramie Canal as 
far as Horse Creek at mile 67.5. 

Hiitorioal review, Fort Laramie unit, North Platte project. 



Item. 




1919 



AcreafEe for which service was prepared to supply water. 

Acreage irrigated 

Miles of canal operated 

Water delivered to the land (acre-feet) 

Per acre of land irrigated (acre-feet) 



12,132 

4,708 

70 



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214 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL, REPORT OF RECLAMATION SBRVICB. 

SETTLEKBNT. 

Conditions on the project continued to improve during the year^ 
due principally to prevalent high prices for all farm products and 
excellent market conditions. The number of land transfers has been 
somewhat more than normal and the selling prices have shown a 
gradual increas^^. There is no land on the Interstate unit open for 
entry. No land has been opened on the Fort Laramie or Northport 
units. There was a large decrease in the amoxmt of stock fed on the 

J)rojcct during the winter, although fair profits were reported by the 
eeders. There is some ho^ cholera on the project, out it is well 
under control. A large amount of building is being done over the 
entire project, but this is especiaUy noticeaole in the towns. 

Settlement data^ North Platte project. 



Item. 



Total number of farms on projet t 

Population , 

Number of irrigated farms 

Operated by owners or managers 

Operated by tenants 

Population 

Number of towns 

Population 

Total population In towns and on farms. 

Number of public schools 

N umber of churches 

Number of banks 

Total (itpital stock 

A mount of depo its 

Number ol depo^ito^s 



1915 



1,456 

4,000 

1,095 

082 

413 

3,828 

7 

5,000 

9,000 

34 

25 

15 

$317,000 

$1,710,000 

5,700 



t 



1916 



1,467 

4,200 

1,189 

721 

468 

3,942 

7 

5,500 

9,700 

34 

25 

16 

$352,000 

$1,800,000 

6,000 



1917 



1,406 

4,500 

1,274 

810 

464 

4,056 

7 

8,000 

12,500 

40 

25 

16 

$352,000 

$2,400,000 

7,000 



1918 



U,406 

M,500 

» 1.274 

^774 

500 

14,200 

8 

» 11,000 

116,500 

40 

25 

16 

$352,000 

i$2, 600,000 

7,200 



1919 



1 1,420 

> 4,500 

1 1 310 

860 

450 

4,056 

8 

« 11,610 

116,110 

40 

25 

21 

$462,000 

1 $3, 10^ 000 

1 7 500 



1 Estimated. 



PBINCIPAIi CROPS. 



INTERSTATE UNn. 



The cropped area has continued to increase until in 1919 it was 
estimated to amount to 102,457 acres, including the North Platte 
Canal & Colonization Co.'s lands. Of this amount about 40 per 
cent was in alfalfa, 36 in cereals, 13 in sugar beets, 8 in potatoes, 
and the remaining 3 per cent in miscellaneous crops. The total 
value of the crops for the Interstate unit for the year 1918 was 
$3,100,711.55, with an average value of $36.35 per acre, as com- 
pared with a total value of $3,385,060, and an average value of 
$41.92 per acre in 1917. Increased value per acre was most pro- 
nouncea in the case of sugar beets. The crop yields per acre were 
about normal with the exception of alfalfa, which was below normal. 
Considerable damage was done by ffraashoppers to the alfalfa and 
grain crops. A concerted eilort is being made in the 1919 season 
to rid the project of these pests. On accoimt of insuflBcient moisture 
in the ground for bringing the crops up and the subsequent hot 
and dry weather conditions, the indications are that the crop yields . 
ior 1919 will be bplow the average. 



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NEBRASKA-WYOMING, NOBTH PLATTE PBOJSOT. 



215 



FOBT LARAMIE UNIT. 

The first water to be delivered for irrigation under the Fort 
Laramie unit was in the season of 191S. On account of the iinsea- 
soned condition of the Main Canal and the large number of breaks 
and interruptions which occurred the water delivery was very 
unsatisfactory. Attempts to put large areas under urigation in 
one season resulted in losses. The estimated area in crops in 1919 
is 4,708 acres, of which 70 per cent is in wheat, 19 per cent in cereals, 
9 per cent in alfalfa, and 2 per cent in potatoes. 

Crap report Interstate unil^ North Platte project, Nebraska- Wyoming , year 1918.^ 





Area 
(acres). 


Unit of 
yield. 


Yields. 


Values. 


Crop. 


Total Average 
^^^^' per acre. 


Perunlt 
of yield. 


Total. 


Per acre. 


AMi^^lmy 


37,8fi3 

136 

94 

3,550 

1,800 

0,391 

13 

6,e27 

351 

347 

838 

118 

7,997 

27 

2,497 

«18 

6,203 

721 

9,097 

20 


Too 

Bushel.... 

...do 

...do 

...do 

Ton 

...do 

Bushel.... 

Ton 


66,713 1.8 1 S13.00 


1867,269 

1,100 

3,900 

116,688 

50,098 

781,853 

1,197 

178,978 

3,352 

14,905 

8,790 

925 

135,192 

2,470 

87,455 

3,090 

621,574 

10,454 

262,896 

25 


822.91 


AIMfl^ffAMl 


110 I .8 


10.00 
10.00 
1.10 
4.50 
10.75 
7.00 
1.50 
4,00 


8.08 


Sweet'^dover soed 


390 

106,060 

13,133 

72,684 

171 

119,319 

838 


4.2 
29.9 

7.3 
11.4 
13.2 
18.0 

2.4 


41.49 


Barley 


82.87 


Beanff 


82.83 


Beets, sugar, and tops 

Beets, stock 


122.96 
92.08 


Com 


27.01 


Com fodder 


9.56 


Garden 


42.95 


TTlfcy(othAr) 


Ton 

Bushel.... 

...do 

...do 

Acre 


879 

617 

168,990 

1,235 


1.0 
5.2 
21.1 
45.7 


10.00 
1.50 
.80 
2.00 
15.00 
5.00 
.60 
1.25 
1.90 


10.49 


SietsSd..... ::::.:::;::.: 


7.84 


Oats 


16.91 


Opions . , , 


91.48 


Pasture, aUalla 


15.00 


Pasture! other 


...do 






6.00 


Potatoes 


Bushel.... 

...do 

...do 


1,035.956 

8.363 

133,108 


167.0 
11.6 
14.6 


100.21 


Rye 


14.50 


Wneat 


87.80 




1.26 










Total cropped acreage. 


85,308 

6,716 

1,156 

1,946 

861 

6,716 


Total and average 


3 


3,100,710 


86.81 










Irrigated, no crop: 

AUaUa 8ee<&ig with 
nursecrop 


Areas. 




Acres. 


Farms. 


Per 
cent of 
unit. 


Alfalfa seeding without 
nurse crop 


Total irrl^ble area farms reported. 

Total irrigated area farms reported. 

Under water-ri^ts applications 


108.086 

88,771 

88,021 

750 


1,310 
1,310 
1,292 
18 
1,310 




Fall rye 


96 


FaU wheat 


79 


Less duplicated areas 


78 

1 
7f 


Total irrigated acreage. . 


88,771 


Total cropi 


)ed area farm 


IS reported 




86,30 


B 



1 Szduaiva of North Platte Canal & ColonisaUon Co. lands* 



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216 EIGHTEENTH AKNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 
Crop report, Fort Laramie unit^ North PUdU project, Nebrasha-Wyoming, year of 1918, 



Ciop. 



Area 
(Acres). 



Unit of 
yield. 



Yields. 



Total. 



Averace 
per acre. 



Values. 



Per unit 
of yield. 



TotaL 



Per acre. 



Alfalfa hay 

Barley 

Beans 

Com 

Com fodder 

Garden 

Hay (other) 

Millet seed .• 

Oats: 

UbeKy wheat gio ^rs is . 

Farmers.,...., , 

Wheat: 

. Idberty wheat growMS.. 

Farmers , 

Potatoes b....k 



108 
12 
89 

168 
12 
6 

468 



Ton...., 
Bushel. 
...do...., 
...do..... 
Ton 



72 

90 

819 

8,206 

8 



0.7 

7.6 

8.0 

20.0 

.7 



118.00 
1.10 
4.60 
1.50 
4.00 



89 Bushel. 



440 
899 

2,264 

879 
J7 



Total cropped acreage, 



4,866 



Total irrigated acreage. 



4,866 



Ton. 



..do.. 
..do., 

..do.. 

...do.. 

do.. 



896 



14,000 
11,801 

6,094 
7,505 
4,434 



.9 
17.0 

82.0 
80.0 

8.0 

9.0 

120.0 



10.00 
1.60 



.80 



1.90 
.60 



99 
1,486 
4,806 

82 

466 

3,960 



11,900 
9,440 

11,678 
14,260 
2,650 



18.67 
8.25 

86.81 

2968 
2.67 

77.50 
8.46 

24.43 

26.46 
38.66 

6.11 
16.23 
71.6J 



Total and average. 



61,815 



12.71 



Areas. 



Total irrigable area farms reported: 

Liberty wheat growers , 

Fanners , 

Total irrigated area farms reported: 

Liberty wheat growers 

Farmers , 

Total cropped area farms reported. . 



Acres. 



8,200 
8,340 

2,704 
2,161 



4,865 



No. 
farms. 



Per 
cent of 
project. 



Crop report, North Platte CoTial ds Colonization Co, lands. North Platte project, Wyo- 

ming, year of 1918. 



Crop. 



Area 
(acres). 



Unit of 
yield. 



"Helds. 



Total. 



Avera^ 
per acre. 



Values. 



Per unit 
of yield. 



Total. 



Per acre. 



Ry e w , 

Wheat , 

Oats 

Barley 

Com 

Potatoes 

Sttgar beets and tops.. 

Alfalfa hay 

Miscellaneous 



8 
679 
778 
853 
731 
950 
350 
4,866 
522 



Bushel., 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

...do 

Ton 

..do 



180 
8,314 
15,333 
10,091 
11,913 
117,459 
8.236 
9,444 



23.0 
14.0 
20.0 
30.0 
16.0 
124.0 
9.0 
1.9 



SI. 25 

1.90 

.80 

1.10 

1.50 

.60 

10.76 

18.00 



$225 
16,797 
12,266 
11,760 
17,870 
70,475 
34,787 
122,772 
27,112 



828.13 
37.38 
16.77 
3350 
34.45 
74.18 
99.40 
2523 
51.96 



Total cropped acreage, 



Total irrigated acreage. 



9,137 



Total and average. 



813,064 



34.36 



Areas. 



9,137 Total irrigated area farms reported. 



Acres. 



9,137 



No. 
farms. 



Per 
cent of 
project. 



110 



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ISTBBBASKA-WYOMIKG, NORTH PLATTE PROJECT. 217 

SALE OF SXJPPLEHBNTAL STOBAGE BIGFHTS FBOH PATHFINDEB 
BBBBBVOIB TO PBIVATE LANDS. 

The hydraulic studies mentioned in preceding annual reports are 
being continued by a competent hydrographer, and in cooperation 
with the State of Nebraska, for the purpose of determining losses in 
transmission and accessions from tributaries and obtaining such other 
information as will aid in a determination of water rights and proper 
water distribution. 

PUBLIC NOTICES AND OBDBBS. 
PUBLIO NOTICE, MARCH 11, 1919. 

1. Annual operation and maintenance cliarges. — In pursuance of 
section 4 of the reclamation act of June 17, 1902 (32 Stat., 388), and 
acts amendatory thereof or supplementary thereto, particularly the 
reclamation extension act of August 13, 1914 (38 Stat., 686), an- 
nouncement is hereby made that the annual operation and mainte- 
nance charges for the irrigation season of 1919 and thereafter until 
further notice against all lands of the North Platte project, Nebraska- 
Wyoming, under public notice, shall be as follows: A minimum 
charge of SI. 70 per irritable acre will be made whether water is used 
thereon or not. For aU water delivered prior to and including June 
20 a charge will be made of 65 cents per acre-foot; for all water 
delivered between June 21 and August 31, inclusive, a charge will 
be made of $1.30 per acre-foot, and for water delivered on ana from 
September 1 to the end of the season a charge will be made of 
66 cents per acre-foot. The minimum charge of $1.70 will be 
applied in payment of the charges under the said acre-foot rates. 
All operation and maintenance chaises will be due and payable on 
March 1 of each year for the preceding irrigation season- but where 
water-right application is made for public land entered under the 
reclamation law after June 15, or where water-right application is 
made after August 1 for land in private ownership, no operation and 
maintenance diarge will be made for water delivered diuing the 
remainder of the irrigation reason in which the water-right application 
is made. 

S. G. Hopkins, 
Assistant Secretary of the Interior. 

FINANOIAL STATEMENT. 

Condensed balance sheets, North Platte projectj June SO, 1919. 

Cosh $10,856.06 

In . en tory m aterials and supplies on hand 308, 858. 45 

Cnrrent aooounts due 194,745.68 

Construction water right charges unaccrued 6,852,862.94 

Construction work contracted 6,636.40 

Gross construction cost $10, 643, 517. 27 

Less operation and maintenance revemie earnings $84,030.46 

Less cost adjustments 390.93 

94,421.39 

Net constmctlon cost 10,549,095.88 

Oross operation and maintenance cost 1,006,489.26 

Less operation and maintenance revenue eamuigs 13, 295. 89 

Plus cost adjustments 3,873.41 

9,422.48 

997,066.78 



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218 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPOBT OF RECLAMATION SEBVICB. 

Aoooimts payable $132,331.01 

Conttn^pnt ohligations. • 16,Ma23 

CoUecUons and contracts of speciflc amoants for repaymcntg to rftclamation fond 7,671,166.17 

Capital investment: 

DLs'^ursemeat, transfer, and Joint construction vouchers received $11, 937, 044. 87 

Collection , transfer, refund, and Joint construction vouchers issued 1, 837, 88a 00 

Net Investment 10,009,16178 

Feature co$ts of North Platte project. 
INTERSTATE UNIT. 



Principal feature. 


Fiscal year 
1919. 


Total to June 
30, 1919. 


Examination and surveys: 

Northport district 


I « $4, 183. 30 
9,633.74 




Seconoar V projects and investigations 


$61,165l14 


Water-right adijudioations 


9,473.89 








Subtotal 


5,450.44 


70,638w53 






Storage system: 

Pathflnder Reservoir 




1,824,042.64 

209, 73a 19 

560,876.41 

7^436. 69 


Lake Alice Reservoir 




Lake Minatare Reservoir 


3,290.00 
356.40 


Two Winters Creek Lake Reservoir 






Subtotal 


3,645.40 


2,602,066.98 




Canal svsteni: 

Whalen diversion dam 


31,164.87 

2,045.00 

4,929.88 

190.00 


266,175.41 

1,043 ML 95 

854, 27a 17 

447,194.84 


First division Interstate Canal 


Second division Interstate Canal 


Third division Interstate Canal .. . 




Subtotal 


38,329.75 


2,611,182.37 




Lateral svstem: 

Rawhide 




3,819.31 
360,266.63 
287,026.97 
296,780.53 


District No. 1 


374.42 

1,726.43 

782.14 


District No.2 


District No. 3 




Subtotal 


2,882.99 


947,902.44 




Drainage system: 

Dralnaec Lnvestifations 


6,609.71 
60,623.77 
7,360.43 


25,298.73 
170,608.67 
iaO,34L72 


Open drains 


Closed drains 




Subtotal 


83,403.91 


•816,244.12 




Irrigable area form units 




43,003.29 




...... . 


Permanent improvements and lands: 

Buildings at Pathfinder Dam , . . . , 




5,ooaoo 

5 83a66 
34,65144 
845a 95 
5,272.18 


RuiifitnfT^, first division . . , . , 




Buildings^ second divisien 


**t 11,018.96 
1,605.33 


Rnildln^j %lr^ird dfviffion 


E>q)erimental farm buildings 






Subtotal 


•9,413.63 


64,206.22 




Operation and maintenance during constructicHi (water-rental basis) 




428,457.18 
82; 072. 95 


Accrued and unpaid operation and matnteoance transferred tocanstruction. 






Total cost of construction features 


124,388.86 


7,165,793.03 
120,736.13 


RA|AiH*e in plant iincounts - - - 






Subtotal— Gross eonstruction cost of the Interstate unit June 30, 1919. 


124,388.86 


7,276,52a 16 



1 Transferred to Northport unit. 

* Deduct. 

* Right of way and damage clatms transferred to their respective features. 



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NEBRASKA-WYOMING, NORTH PLATTE PROJECT. 
Feature eo$ts of North Platte project — Continued. 

NOBTHPOBT l^NIT. 



219 



Prinoipal feature. 


Fiscal year 
1919. 


Total to June 
30, 1919. 


Bxaminatim and snrvflys: NorthiM>rt dlstrlctr , r - 


» $4, 183. 30 


$4, 183. 30 




Canal system: 

Surveys 


10,S76.31 
13,576.22 
13,456.26 


10,876.31 
13,576.22 
13,456.26 


Earthwork 


Structures 




Subtotal 


37,908.79 


37,908.79 






lateral system: 


2,205.40 
3,509.49 
5,447.10 


2,205.40 
3,509.49 
5, 447. 10 


Earthwork 


Structures 






Subtotal 


11,161.99 


11,161.99 






Total cost o' construction featuresr 


63,254.08 


53,254.08 
22,075.30 


BalaiKH^ In nlant tu*.o.nl^■nt 






Subtotal— Gross construotion cost Northport unit June 30, 1919 


53,254.08 


75,329.38 



FORT LARAMIE UNIT. 



Examinations and surveys: 

General surveys 

Water rights 

Guernsey storage reservoir . 



Subtotal. 



Canal system: 

Surveys 

Whalen Dam and headworks 

Tunnel No. 1 

Tunnel No. 2 

Earthwork to State line 

Concrete lining 

Protec tins canal banks 

Roads ana bridges 

Canal right of way including fencing.. 

Primmg main canal 

Sand traps 

Siphons 

Ciflverts 

Waste ways ,..,.,., 

Turnouts 

Checks 

Minor structures 



Subtotal.. 

lAteral system: 

Surveys 

Earthwork.. 
Structures... 



SubtoUl. 



Dndnage system: 

Drainage hivestigations. 
Open drams 



Subtotal. 



Irrigable area farm units 

Permanent improvements and lands: Buildings 

Telephone system 

Operation and malntenanoe during construction (water-rental basis) . 

Total cost of construction features 

Balance in plant accounts 



Gross cost of constructian . 



16,350.00 



6,350.00 



3,102.35 

l,721.a» 

3,228.49 

*' • 610. 13 

362,444.07 



90.56 
11,459.24 

5,760.50 
25,605.09 

7, 185. 86 
36,528.30 
33,302.73 
32,902.42 

8,440.82 

24,587.16 

115.60 



655,864.89 



28,344.69 
75,433.22 
33,249.70 



137,027.61 



<»«521.9l 
.7,783.42 



7,261.51 



2,083.72 
12,301.01 



9,676.84 
29,594.06 



760,169.64 



760,169.64 



123,985.47 
6,350.00 
2,554.24 



0.71 



43,8''«.57 

26,5ai.0O 

168,270.90 

147, 3*^. 52 . 

1,464,382.66 

14, 608.09 

24,254.07 

47,405.26 

8,808.45 . 

35,613.93 

13,227.65 

. 108,603.14 

. 11^,408.20 

91,339.08 

29,823.21 

24,587.16 

1,070.48 



2,368,280.97 



108,086.55 
142,052.06 
fl0,914.64 



341,053.25 



2.472.40 
7,783.42 



10,255.82 



10.024.85 
22.090.10 



24,783.02 
29,594.06 



2,838,971.78 
452,686.95 



3,291,658.73 



1 Transferred from Interstate unit. 
' Correcting entvs. 



* Deduct. 

« Cash collection Gering drainage district of 1879.91. 



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220 EIGHTEENTH AirSVAL, REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVIOE. 
Feature eoiU of North Platte project-— Continued. 

SUMMARY, ENTIRE PROJECT. 



Principal feature. 



Fiscal year 
1919. 



Total to June 
30, 1919. 



Total cost of coDstrucUan features: 

Interstate unit 

Nortbport unit 

Fort Laramie unit 



$124,388.86 
63,264.08 
760,159.64 



$7,155,793.03 

63,264. 0» 

2,838,971. 7g 



Gross cost of construction features. , 

Plant accounts: 

Interstate unit 

Northport unit 

Fort Laramie unit 



937.802.68 



10, 048, 018. 8» 



120,736.1$ 
22,076.3a 
462,686.96 



Total, plant accounts.... 
Gross construction cost. . 



606,498.3ft 



937,802.68 



10,643,617.37 



Less revenues earned during canstruction period: 

Rentals of buildings 

Rentals of grazinff and farming lands 

Rentals of Irrigatron water 

Contractors freight refunds 

Value of water furnished power plant 

Other revenues unclassified 

Loss on hospital operations 



1.637.84 

1569.00 

6,620.18 

1,709.97 

939.00 

539.89 

» 7,147.60 



8,286.39 

24,43L17 

23,356.4$ 

36,017.64 

939. 0» 

1,939.8$ 

1548.07 



Total revenues to June 30, 1919 

Net oanstructian cost to June 30, 1919. 



2,730.38 



94,42L39 



936,073.30 



10,649,096.8$ 



1 Deduct. 



Statement of cott, by calendar yearSf North Platte project, 





Operation and maintenance. 






Construction. 


During oon- 
strucuon. 


Under public 
notice. 


Total. 


Total cost. 


Year ending Dec. 31— 

1904... 


$96,ooaoo 

692,796.80 
1,219,062.96 
961,006.48 
614,063.87 
476,800.01 
448,638.71 
416,061.03 
355,625.45 
307,426.87 
434,328.31 
824,067.45 
644,736.50 
084,813.06 
1,100,548.26 
251,068.16 








$06,ooaoo 

092,796.80 
1,219,052:96 
963,504.87 
623,440.06 
639,253.06 
672,096.96 


1905 




/.... 


1906 






1907 


$2,408.39 
8,486.18 
63,353.75 
173,660.95 
135,303.36 
11,587.00 
12,250.75 
16, 25a 00 
6,166.80 




$2,408.39 
8,486.18 

63,353.75 
224,358.26 
198,365.49 

77,378.63 

86,603.24 
100,276.75 
120,006.80 
119,603.74 
140,004.80 
363,106.71 
143,40a82 


1908 




1909 




1910 


$50,607.30 

63,062.13 

65,79L63 

74,442.49 

84,026.75 

114, 86a 00 

119,603.74 

140,994.80 

235,176.66 

130,826.91 

«82,072.96 


1911 


616,317.43 
433.003.96 


1912 


1913 


484, 120. 11 
534,605.06 
444,074.26 


1914 


1915 


1916 


764,430.33 


1917 




1,134,808.76 


1918 


16,93a 16 
12,663.91 

> 82, 072. 96 


1,442,664.96 
306,448.96 


Januarv to June 30, 1919 


nance charges added to con- 
struction on June 30, 1919 












Subtotal 


9,507,894.70 
505,498.38' 


640,124.19 


1,006,489.26 


1,646,613.46 


11,054,608.15 
506,498.38 


Plant accounts to June 30, 1919. . . 










Total 


10,103,398.08 


540,124.19 


1,006,480.26 


1,646,618.45 


11,660,006.5$ 





1 This item carried under "ronstruction," In prior years. TraDsltered to present location in order to 
show actual total cost of operation and maintenance. 
« Deduct. 



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NEBRASKA-WYOMING, NORTH PLATTE PROJECT. 221 

Statement of edit, by fiscal yean, North Platte project. 











Construction. 


During con- 
struction. 


Under public 
notice. 


Total. 


Total cost. 


Year ending June 30- 

1905. rf? 


$190,000.00 

1,195,591.61 

1,242,613.82 

679,680.98 

550,226.76 

401,673.07 

495,704.37 

338,198.89 

373,052.00 

421,780.94 

446,895.69 

348,531.53 

855,648.91 

1,060,387.61 

906,208.52 








|190,00a00 
1,198,000.00 

i,26i,ooaoo 

743,034.73 


1906 


92,408.39 
8,486.18 
63,353.75 
173,660.05 
135,308.36 
11,587.00 
12, 25a 75 
16,250.00 
5,156.80 




12,408.39 

8,486.18 

63,3,53.75 

173,660.95 

135,303.36 

112,981.61 

76,980.41 

83,103.40 

87,188.38 

86,021.92 

108,423.94 

115,514.49 

228,289.61 

264,897.06 


1907 




1908 




1909 




723,887.71 
536,876.43 


1910 




1911 


8101,394.61 
64,729.66 
66,853.40 
82,031.58 
86,021.92 
108,423.94 
115,514.49 
228,289.61 
235,303.00 

« 82, 072. 95 


608,685.98 
415,179.30 
456,155.40 


1912 


1913 


1914 


508.909.32 


1915 


632,917.61 


1916 




456,955.47 


1917 




971, 063. 40 


1918 




1,288,677.22 
1,173,105.58 


1919 


29,594.06 
» 82, 072. 95 


Unpaid operation and mainte- 
nance charges added to con- 
struction to June 30, 1919 










Subtotal 


9,507,894.70 
505,49&38 


540,124.19 


1,006,480.26 


1,546,613.45 


11,054,508.15 
595,498.38 


Plant ft4yy>t|nts 












•iy)tal 


10,103,393.08 


540,124.19 


1,006,489.26 


1,546,613.45 


11,660,006.58 





» This item carried under "Construction" In prior years, 
show actual total cost of operation and maintenance. 
« Deduct. 



Transferred to present location in order to 



Estimated cost of contemplated work, North Platte project, during fiscal year 19t0. 



Features. 



Sub- 
feature. 



PnncJpal 
feature. 



Storage system: Pathfinder Dam regulating works . 
Canafsystem: 

Interstate unit 

Cherry Creek drain and wasteway 

Indian Creek drain and wasteway 

Korthport Canal 

Lateral system: 

Interstate unit 

Fort Laramie unit 



13,500 

60,000 

8,600 

82,000 



4,300 
170,000 



Drainage system: Interstate unit 

Operation and maintenance, water rentals. 
Operation and maintenance, public notice.. 
Reimbursable accounts 



Total. 



1150,000 



154.100 



174,800 
60,000 
20,000 

190,000 
6,000 



754,400 



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222 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 
Operating costs and revenues, North Platte (Interstate) project, to Dec. SI, 1918, 





Calendar year 1918. 


To end calendar year 1918. 




Opera- 
tion. 


Mainte- 
nance. 


Total. 


Opera- 
tion. 


Mainte- 
nance. 


Total. 


COSTS. 

Storage works: 

Pathfinder Reservoir 


$8,925.00 

27L24 

5,556.97 

3,249.68 


1940.80 

295.54 

2,016.99 


$9,865.80 

666.78 

7,573.96 

3,249.68 


$33,524.74 
4,012.74 
7,022.19 
14,661.72 


$6,32L79 
1,203.31 
7,219.89 


$39,846.53 
5,216.05 
14,242.08 
14,66L72 


Lake > lice Reservoir 


Lake ^finatftre Reservoir 

Gagtnp North Platte River 










18,002.89 


3,253.33 


21,266.22 


59,22L39 


14,744.99 


73,966.3$ 


Canal system: 


3,246.72 
12,893.48 
6,0ia88 


608.79 
32,650.29 
20,275.96 


3,855.51 
45,643.77 
26,286.84 


11,856.97 
77,403.73 
43,352.02 


1,179.30 
171,309.13 
60,669.14 


13,036.27 
248,712.86 
104,02Lie 


First (li\ ision Main Canal 

Second division Main Canal 


Lateral svstem: 

Rawhide 1st and 2d lateral dis- 
tricts 


22,151.08 


53,535.04 


75,686.12 


132,612.72 


233,157.57 


365,770.29 


17,177.57 
12,765.27 


64,255.77 
37,255.11 


81,433.34 
50,010.38 


139,163.66 

58,578.88 


187,884.23 
104,163.57 


327,047.89 
162,742.46 


Third lateral district 






29,932.84 


101,510.88 


131,443.72 


197,742.54 


292,047.80 


489,790.34 


Drainage system: 

Open drains 




4,393.75 
977.29 


4,393.75 
977.29 


72L20 
8a 13 


21,866.47 
2,429.61 


22,587.67 
2,509.74 


Closed drains 












5,371.04 


5,371.04 


80L33 


24,296.08 


25,097.41 






Undistributed expenses: Crop reports 


694.76 


724. 70 


1,419.46 


3,110.88 


~ 


3,lia88 








Subtotal 


70,78L57 


164,394.99 


235,176.56 


393,488.86 


564,246.44 


957,735.30 
182,072.96 


Less operation and mainte- 
nance transferred to con- 
struction 














Total 












875,662.36 
















REVENUES. 

Operation and maintenance charges 
accrued on contracts with water- 
right anplicants 






211,954.51 

1,385.65 

32.00 

2,238.49 

2,626.85 

740.71 

13,600.51 






822,350.62 
1,947.7^ 
1,223.96 
4,468.84 


Operation and maintenance charges 
paid in advance by water-right 
ap'>llcants 










Operation and maintenance charges 
paid and forfeited by water-right 
ar)T>licants 










Penalties on operation and mainte- 
nance charges accnied on contracts 
with water-right applicants 










Rentals of iirigation water ^ 










15,363.19 
1,782.59 

18,911.2& 


Gain on farming operations 










Less tliscoiint allowed on operation 
and maintenance charges accrued 
on contracts with water-right ap- 
plicants 




















Total 






215,287.70 






838,225.70 












Difference (deficit) 






19,888.86 






37,436.66 













I Deduct. 



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HEVADA, VEWLAlfDS (FOBHEBLT TBTTCEEE-CABSON) 

PBOJECT. 

John F. Richardson, project manager, Fallon, Nev. 

LOCATION. 

Counties: Churchill, Storey, and Lyon. 

Townships: 17 and 18 N., Rs. 17 to 30 E.; 19 N., Rs. 26 to31 E.; 20N., Rs. 22 toSl 
E., Mount Diablo meridian. 

Railroad: Southern Pacific. 

Railroad stations and estimated population, June 30, 1919: Femley, 100; Hazer.. 
100; Fallon, 2,000; Stillwater, 25. 

WATBB SUPPLY. 

Source of water 8upi>ly: Truckee and Carson Rivera. 

Area of drainage basin: 3.450 square miles. 

Annual run-off in acre-feet : Truckee River at Tahoe (519 square miles), 1901 to 1918, 
maximum, 704,000; minimimi, 113,000; mean, 274,500. Truckee River at Derby dam 
'1,740 square miles^ 1900 to 1918, ma^umimi, 1,435,000; minimum, 356,000; mean, 
842,400. Careon River at Empire (988 square miles), 1901 to 1918, maximimi, 731,000; 
minimum, 172,000; mean, 392,800. 

AGBICXJLTTJBAL AND CLIMATIC CONDITIONS. 

Area for which service is prepared to supply water, season 1919: 65,752 acres. 

Area under water-right applications and rental contracts, season 1919: 55,357 acres. 

Length of irrigation season: From Apnl 1 to October 15, 198 days. 

Average elevation of irrigable area: 4,000 feet above sea level. 

Rainfall on irrigable area: Average 4 inches (maximum record 1913, 8.08 inches). 

Range of temperature on irrigable area: — 20° to 100*^ F. 

Character of soil of irrigable area: Exceedingly variable; sand, sandy loam, adobe, 
clav, and volcanic ash. 

^ncipal products: Alfalfa, small grain, potatoes, onions, sugar beets, truck crops, 
and dairy products. 

Principal markets: Nevada and Pacific coast communities. 

LANDS OPENED FOB ntBIGATION. 

Dates of pubUc notices and ordere: May 6, November 1, 1907; January 30, April 4, 
June 5, December 26, 1908; March 1, September 28, 1909; April 26, September 16, 
1910; April 22, Octx)ber 17, 1911; February 8, June 13, 1912; January 17, June 23, 
July 15, July 21, 1913; August 19, December IC, 1914; January 30, February 26, 
March 20, Mav 13, November 12, 1915; January 17, February 11, 1916; March 10, 
March 22, July 16, July 31, October 30, 1917; January 2, January 15, April 3, April 10, 
May 7, May 20, July 9, August 14, October 1, December 3, 1918; April 23, May 31, 1919. 

Location of lands opened: Ts. 17 to 20 N., Rs. 23 to 31 E., Mount Diablo meridian. 

Limit of area of farm units: 40 to 160 acres. 

Duty of water: 3 acre-feet per acre per annum at the farm. 

Building charge per acre of irrigable lands: $22, $30, $60, $65, and $115 (for Carson 
Lake leveled lands). 

Annual operation and maintenance charge per acre of irrigable land: Femley and 
Hazen benches, approximately $3.12 per acre; Fallon district, approximately $1.95 
per acre, based on cost of service. 

CHBONOLOGICAL SX7MMABY. 

Reconnaissance made and preliminary surveys begim in 1902. 
Construction recommended by director, March 7, 1903. 
Construction conditionally authorized by Secretary, March 14, 1903. 
Truckee Canal completed June, 1905. 

223 



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224 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL BEPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

Carson River headworks and main distributing canals completed September, 1905. 
First irrigation by Reclamation Service season of 1906. 
Tnickee Canal chute completed November, 1910. 
Lahontan Dam commenced January, 1911. 
Lahontan Dam completed June, 19*15. 

United States took poesesaion of outlet works at Lake Tahoe and assumed control 
July 1, 1915. 
TYuckee-Carson irrigation district organized November 16, 1918. 
Entire project 52 per cent completed June 30, 1919. 

ntBIGATION PLAN. 

The irrigation plan of the Newlands project provides for the storage of water 
on the headwaters of Truckee River, in Lake Tahoe, in the Alkali Flat Reserv^oir, 
neur Churchill, Nov., and in Lahontan Reservoir on Carson River; the diversion of 
water from Truckee River by a dam about 20 miles below Reno, Nov., into the Truckee 
Canal, supplying water to lands in the Truckee and Carson River valleys and to the 
Lahontan Reservoir; the diversion of water from Carson River by a dam near Da5^n, 
Nov., for storage in Alkali Flat Reservoir and irrigating lands in Churchill Valley 
below that reservoir; and the diversion of water from Carson River by a dam about 
5 miles below the Lahontan storage dam into two canal systems, one on either side 
of the river, watering lands in the lower Carson River Valley. The United States 
claims all waste, seepage, unappropriated spring, and percolating water arising within 
the project and proposes to use such water in connection therewith. 

The features ot the above irrigation plan which have been completed are: The dam 
at the outlet of Lake Tahoe, including the greater portion of the accessory dredging 
of the Truckee River Channel; the diversion dam in Truckee River near Derby, Nov., 
the Truckee Canal carrying water from this diversion 31 miles to the terminal con- 
crete chute dischamng into the Lahontan Reservoir; the forebay for the hydroelectric 
Slant discharging Trucke^ Canal water into Carson Rrver below Lahontan Dam; the 
iversion dam in Carson River situated about 5 miles below Lahontan Dam: that 
portion of the irrigation system which includes laterals taking out of Truckee Canal 
in the vicinity of Fernley and Hazen; and the two main canals heading at Carson 
diversion dam and extending over the main portions of the project in Carson sink, 
with Fallon as a center. 

Construction of Li^ontan Dam and Reservoir was completed in June, 1915, for the 
conservation of the flood waters in both the Truckee and Carson Rivers. 

The features remaining for future construction are: The Alkali Flat Reservoir, or 
equivalent reservoirs in the upper Carson Valley, as may later be determined; the 
upper Truckee storage reservoirs as required: the extension of the irrigation system 
to cover additional irrigable areas adjacent to and on all sides of the project as already 
constructed: and the extension of the drainage system which may become necessary 
as supplemental construction in behalf of the water users imder the provisions of the 
reclamation extension act, or which may be constructed under contract with the 
Truckee-Carson irrigation district. 

SXJMMABY OF GENEBAL DATA FOB NEWLANDS PBOJECT TO END 
OF FISCAL YEAB 1919. 

Areas: 

Irrigable acreage when project is complete " 231, 000 

Public land entered to June 30, 1919 27, 839 

Public land oi>en to entry on June 30, 1919 470 

Public land withdrawn on June 30, 1919 89, 351 

Railroad land June 30, 1919 26, 900 

Private land June 30, 1919 86,440 

Acreage service could have supplied in season of 1918 71, 817 

Estimated acreage service can supply in season 1919 65, 752 

Estimated acreaee service can supply in season 1920 67, 000 

Acreage irrigated season of 1918 42, 311 

Acreage cropped under irrigation season of 1918 41, 490 

Crops: 

Value of irrigated crops season of 1918 |1, 626, 142 

Value of irrigated crops per acre cropped $53. 15 



t Includes Upper Oarson unit of 30,000 acres. 



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NEVADA, NEWLANDS (FORMERLY TRUCKEE-CARSON ) PROJECT. 225 

Finances: 

Net construction cost to June 30, 1919 $6, 370, 141. 73 

Per cent completed cm Jtme 30, 1919 52 

Appropriated for fiscal year 1920 $359, 000. 00 

Estinttated per cent complete by June 30, 1920 55 

Proposed appropriation for fiscal year 1921 $664, 000. 00 

Estimated per cent complete by June 30, 1921 60 

Announced construction charges per acre, $22, $30, $60,$65, » $115.00 

Appropriation fiscal year 1919 $671, 000. 00 

Deduction under 10 per cent provision '67, 100. 00 

Increase miscellaneous collections 43, 682. 68 

Balance 1918 appropriation 539, 943. 00 

Increased compensation 13, 560. 19 

$1, 201, 085. 87 

Expenditures chargeable to 1919 appropriation: 

Disbursements $250, 299. 08 

Transfers 20, 061. 01 

Current liabilities 37, 500. 00 

Contingent liabilities 307, 860. 09 

Unencumbered t alance on July 1, 1919 893,225.78 

Repayments: 

Value of construction water-right contracts 1, 431, 587. 25 

Construction charges: 

Accrued toJune30, 3919 378,501.95 

Collected to June 30, 1919 8 374^ 343 qq 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 3, 653. 89 

Operation and maintenance charges (public notice): 

Accrued toJune30, 19iy 372,697.60 

Collected to June 30, 1919 '•355,651.62 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 17, 045. 98 

Water rental charges: 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 9,053.40 

Collected to June 30, 1919 8, 989. 90 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 6a 60 

Power charges: 

Accrued toJune30, 1919 76,617.48 

Collected to June 30, 1919 74,465.91 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 2, 151. 57 

Drainage: 

Estimated acreage damaged by seepage to June 30, 1919 12, 000 

Miles of drains built to June 30, 1919— 

Open 14.32 

Closed a 99 

Totel 18.31 

Estimated acreage protected by drains to June 30, 1919 16, 300 

Estimated acreage to be protected by authorized system 19, 600 

Cost of drainage works to June 30, 1919 $109, 618. 46 

» For leveled lands. 

« Deduct. 

* Includes 15.436.50 taken up on joint construction vouchers. 

4 Includes $6,158.36 taken up on joint construction vonohera. 

138554—19 ^15 



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226 EIGHTBBNJH ANNUAL REPOBT OF RECLAMATION SEEVIC3K. 
CONSTBTTCTION DUBING FISCAL YEAB. 

Lateral construction. — ^Work under this feature consisted of the 
loUowing: 

South Fork Lateral, 6,900 feet in length, involving 5,400 cubic 
yards of excavation, was constructed during July and August, 1918. 
This work was done by Grovernment forces for the purpose of divert- 
ing seepage and waste waters from the South Fork of the Carson 
River at a point above the Peter Mori Dam, conveying the same to 
the '^AA^^ Canal. 

E4' Lateral Extension, 7.1 miles in length, involving 30,000 cubic 
yards of material, was constructed by Government forces for the 
irrigation of the Carson Lake pasture. Seventeen minor timber 
structures were installed. Work was commenced during July, 1918, 
and completed during December, 1918. Capacity of this lateral is 
about 27 second-feet. 

During November and December, 1918, the LF lateral, 2.1 milrs 
in length, was reconstructed and extended, about 15,326l cubic yards 
of material being removed by Government forces. This lateral will 
irrigate the proposed Grimes pasture area and also the Carson Lake 
pasture. 

Work on N lateral improvement consisted in the change in lateral 
grades and cross section. Numerous concrete and timber structures 
were raised and about 7,700 cubic yards of material were removed 
by Government forces. 

During March, 1919, the K9x Lateral Extension, involving the 
removal of 3,004 cubic yards of material, was constructed by con- 
tractors J. A. Wood and S. M. Fulkerson, and the Heritage Lateral, 
requiring 1,750 cubic yards of excavation, was built by contractor 
T. V. Conner. The Brooner lateral, with 354 cubic yards of excava- 
tion, was constructed bj^ Government forces during March. 

The Bx lateral extension, about 1,350 feet in length and requiring 
1,925 cubic yards of excavation, was constructed during April under 
contract by J. A. Wood. A timber flume 190 feet in length, across the 
South Fork of the Carson River, was completed for this lateral on 
May 10, 1919, by Government forces. 

Under the Peter Mori vested water-right contract, dated May 17, 
1919, and approved June 12, 1919, the service agreed to construct a 
timber flume across the South Fork of the Carson River for the irri- 
gation of certain lands owned by Mr. P. Mori. Construction of the 
flume, which is 86.6 feet in length, was commenced on June 14 and 
completed June 28. 

On June 20, 1919, bids were opened for the reconstruction of the 
''Q" laterals and sublaterals in the Soda Lake district, involving the 
removal of about 17,000 cubic yards of material. Division of this 
work was made between 7 schedules. Only one proposal was 
received ; J. A. Wood bid on Schedule I at 18 cents per cubic yard, 
and this schedule was awarded to him. Proposals were later received 
on the remaining schedules and they will be completed under contract. 

During the fiscal year about 112 minor lateral timber structures 
were installed. Seven timber structures costing from $100 to $500 
and two timber structures costing $500 or over were also installed. 

Land preparation. — Under a form of contract approved June 12, 
1918, by the director and chief engineer land leveling by Government 



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NEVADA, NEWIiANDS (FORMERLY TRUCKEE-CARSOK ) PROJECT. 227 

forces was done on 11 farm units owned by J. P. Green, F. P. Stein- 
brook, E. S. Evans, D. W. Lucas, R. L. Combs, W. F. Davenport,, 
O. F. Heizer, Zay Barber, Percy Mills, Martin Strasdin, and Fredl 
Pflum. Areas aggregating about 335 acres were leveled on these 
places. Work oftius nature was discontinued during March, 1919, 
after which time the Government tractors and levehng equipment 
were rented to project water users to carry on private land leveling 
operations. 

Drainage construction. — ^The only drainage construction work in 
progress during the year charjgeable to construction consisted in the 
completion of the Fernley drains the work on which was commenced 
November 22, 1917. These drains were completed July 10, 1918, a 
total of 132,858 cubic yards of material being moved in a length of 
18,213 feet. Work was done by Government forces under supple- 
mental construction, under puWic notice dated October 30, 1917* 
Structures installed in this drain consisted of one redwood timber 
drop, one 24-inch cast iron culvert oinder the Southern Pacific Tail- 
road, one 36-inch corrugated culvert under K2B' lateral, four metal 
flumes, and five timber highway bridges. 

Cleaning of the lower end of the South Fork of the Carson River to 
the *'Lc^' drain and including a portion of this drain was commenced 
June 11, 1918, and continueato station 152 + 90, at which point work 
was discontinued as an expenditure of approximately $2,700 had been 
incurred. Verbal agreement had been entered into between the 
project manager and water users in the district to be benefited, that 
about $3,000 would be expended. The cost of this work was charged 
to maintenance. A Momghan dragline excavator with 1 cubic yard 
Page bucket was used. 

Truclcee Canal imvrovement. — This work was commenced on Oct^^ 
ber 7, 1918, at Truckee Canal station 549+00 using the old Monighan 
dra^ine excavator which had been repaired and overhauled following 
Fernley drain construction. 

This work consisted in the reinforcement of the lower canal bank 
by enlarging the cross section. At the end of the fiscal year the bank 
had been strengthened between stations 549 and 716. About 3,000^ 
linear feet of bank were also reinforced during May and June, 1919,. 
at the lower end of the canal north of Lahontan, using the new 
Monighan dragline excavator which was shipped to Lanontan on 
April 22, 1919. 

Without work of this natiu'e being done, the canal was unsafe for 
carrying even moderate amounts of water and it would be impossible 
to operate it at its originally contemplated capacity of 1,200 second- 
feet. Pending the approval of final plans for the improvement of 
the whole canal it is planned to continue this work, strengthening 
the banks at the weakest places. 

Lahontan Dam spiUvxiy and outlet gate repairs. — Work of resurfac- 
ing the right Lahontan Dam spillway and a portion of the spillway 
pool rim, which wap commenced during the fiscal year '1918, was 
completed during August, 1918. An area of about 31,600 square feet 
of the concrete surface was resurfaced with from 1 to 3 inches of 
gunite. 

Repair of the high pressure outlet gates was completed during 
November, 1918, with the installation of two new cylindrical gate 



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228 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

valves and construction of concrete radial walls in the gate chamber 
to reduce the rotary water motion. 

**T"' Line Canal improvement — The work of strengthening the 
lower bank of the "T'' Line Canal at the Trolson Bend was com- 
menced on May 22 at station 36 + 00 and at the end of June, 1919, 
station 67+00 had been reached. Monighan dragline excavator 
^o. 4 which was received on the project on May 10, 1919, was used 
for this work. As originally designed this canal was to carry about 
400 second-feet, but owing to the lower bank being of insufficient cross 
section it has been impossible to safely convey more than about 150 
second-feet of water in the same. During 1917 canal breaks at the 
Trolson Bend necessitated the payment of damages by the service 
for the injury of adjacent farming lands. Development of lands in 
the Soda Lake district now being opened will require more water 
ihan the canal has been able to carry without improvement. 

Project shops and yards, — ^The erection of new project shops, ware- 
houses, and yards on a site purchased from the Williams Estate Co. 
near the FaUon Railroad depot, and more accessible to the project 
office, was commenced during April; these were sufficiently completed 
during June to be placed in operation. Construction of a railroad 
spur and the finishing of minor buildings remained to be done at the 
end of the fiscal year. 

Miscellaneous. — Construction of about 1 mile of road to replace a 
portion of the Fallon-Carson City road (Lincoln Highway) which 
was submerged by the Lahontan Reservoir was necessary during May, 
1919. One timber culvert 24 feet in length was installed. 

A new timber canal turnout to supplement the delivery of water 
to the **Klb" lateral and to permit tne abandonment of a portion 
of this ditch was installed during February, 1919, at Truckee Canal 
station 645. The cost of this work was charged to maintenance. 

A new ditchrider's house and station was built during July, 1918, 
on land purchased by the service from John Wilson anaL. A. Beck- 
stead in sec. 23, T. 18 N., R. 28 E., M. D. M. 

On September 19, 1917, contract was entered into between the 
United States and E. S. Berney for the lease of the N. i NE. \ of . 
sec. 35, T. 18 N., R. 29 E., M. D. M., for agricultural purposes. This 
contract was approved January 25, 1918, by Morris feien, acting 
director. This unit had been rough leveled by the Government, ana 
under the contract E. S. Berney finished leveling the unit, made 
levees, constructed farm ditches and drains, and installed irrigation 
structures. Wheat and barley were planted by the lessee, which, 
when harvested during August, 1918, yielded about 39.6 tons of wheat 
and 8.5 tons of barley, of which amount, in consideration of the lease, 
the service received a one-fifth share. This lease expires September 

1, 1919. Alfalfa seed, purchased by the service, was planted with 
wheat on this tract during the spring of 1919. The service is to 
receive a one-third portion of the 1919 crop. 

Upper Carson unit investigations, which were commenced August 

2, 1917, were terminated at the end of the fiscal year, and the office 
at Minden, Xev., was closed on Jime 30, 1919. 

The survey of Lake Tahoe shore-line ownerships and investi- 
gations were commenced on June 2, 1918, and actively continued in 
the field until about September 30, after which time mapping and 
other office work was carried on imtil about December 15, 1918. On 



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IfTEYABA, inSWlASDQ (ItXEXSELY XKUOKSB-GABSOlSr ) PBOJEOT. 229 

April 23, 1919, active preparations were started for the dragging or 
sounding of Lake Tahoe under the supervision of an officer of the 
United States Coast and Geodetic Survey. This survey was com- 
pleted in June, 1919, after which the surveys of the Truckee River and 
the railway, owned by the Lake Tahoe Railway & Transportation Co., 
below Lake Tahoe, were commenced. Surveys at Lake Tahoe have 
been made for the piu'pose of obtaining data for use in the settlement 
of the rights of the tnited States to regulate the lake as a storage 
reservoir. 

Diu'ing the year the collection and preparation of evidence for the 
adjudication of the Truckee River water rights before the Federal 
court at Carson City were continued. This suit has been called for 
hearing August 4, 1919. The collection of evidence was commenced 
during 1913. 

SEEPAGE AND DBAIKAGE. 

Based upon surveys and examinations made during August, 1918, 
recommendation was made and approved granting temporary suspen- 
sion of charges on 1,221 acres of seeped and alkalied lands. This rep- 
resented an area of about 97 acres in excess of that upon which 
charges were suspended diu'ing the previous year. This represents 
only a portion oi the lands so affected, but many of the owners are 
backward about taking advantage of having their charges suspended 
owing to the effect this might have upon the sale value oiF their places. 

As previously mentioned, the only drainage construction wort done 
during the jear consisted in the completion of the Fernley drain and 
the deepenmg of a portion of the *'Lc" drain. 

On Jsovember 9, 1918, more detailed drainage investigations, cover- 
ing the entire project, were commenced and continued until the end 
of May, 1919. Under date of April 22, 1919, a drainage report by a 
board of engineers consisting of LJrainage Enraieer J. L. Burkholder, 
Dr. Elwood Mead, and Project Manager John F. Richardson, was pre- 
pared and submitted to the chief oi construction on the subject of 
'Drainage — Newlands project." On May 12, 1919, the board of 
directors of the Truckee-Carson irrigation district passed a resolution 
approving the plans for drainage as outlined in the report above 
mentioned. 

BOARD MEETINGS. 



Date. 



Topic. 



Peraonnel. 



1918. 
Nov. 27 



1019. 
Jan. 30 



A ppraisal of damages to riparian landowners Engineer James Munn and Project Manager J. F. 
around Lake Tahoe. Richardson. 



Upper Carson project . 



Jan. 31 Truckee Canal capacity 

Feb. 6 j Pyramid unit versus upper Carson unit for 

I early construction. 
Apr. 4 I Land leveling—- ewlands project 

Apr. 22 



D. C. Henny, consulting engineer, and John F. 
Richardson, project manager. 
Do. 
Do. 

Engiroer James Munn and Project Manager John 
I I F. Richardson. 

Drainage of Newlands project, Nevada ' Drainage Engineer J. L. Burkholder, Dr. Flwood 

I Mead, and John F. Richardson, project man- 
ager. 



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230 MCtHTlBBNTH AlsmnTAL REPORT OF RB(XiAMATlOlSr SEBYIGE. 
OPEBATION AND MAINTENANCE. 

Water supply, — ^The natural flow of the Truckee and Carson Rivers, 
with the combined storage in Lake Tahoe and Lahontan Reservoir, 
was far in excess of the project irrigation demands. Lake Tahoe 
reached its maximum elevation of 6,228.70 feet on June 23, 1918. 
Although this elevation represents a total storage of 564,000 acre-feet, 
it did not permit any new accumulation of United States reserved 
waters, as the basis for such storage is elevation 6,229 feet. The 
Lahontan Reservoir also reached its maximimi elevation of 4,146.50 
feet on June 23, 1918, with a storage of 153,580 acre-feet. 

At the end of the irrigation season on October 15, 1918, there 
remained in Lake Tahoe 24,938 acre-feet of United States storage 
carried over from the 1917 accumulation. Lahontan Reservoir con- 
tained 84,150 acre-feet at the close of the season, none of which was 
wasted during the winter, as in previous years. 

The snow accumulation at Summit, Calif., during the winter of 
1918-19 began about the middle of October, reached its maximmn 
depth of 150 inches on March 15, and disappeared about the 1st of 
June. While this snoA^'fall was about 30 inones greater than during 
the winter of 1917-18, it was only about two-thirds of the normal. 
Snowfall on the other watersheds of the Truckee and Carson Rivers 
was also below normal, which, following the extremely light fall dur- 
ing the ])revious year, accounts for the small amount of run-off. 

Lake Tahoe reached its maximum elevation of 6,228.06 feet on 
June 8, 1919, which represents a total storage of 487,200 acre-feet 
but no new reserve for the United States. Lahontan Reservoir 
reached its maximum elevation of 4,159.50 feet on June 5, 1919, 
which was the maximum elevation on record and which indicated a 
storage of 249,700 acre-feet. At the beginning of the 1919 irrigation 
season the United States reserve storage in Lake Tahoe amounted to 
16,712 acre-feet. On July 1, 1919, this reserve had been cut down 
to about 13,000 acre-feet, which was deemed sufficient for project 
needs under the Truckee Canal for the current season. 

Use of water. — ^The following table shows the use of water on the 
Newlands project for the years 1910 to 1918 inclusive: 





Area 
irrigated. 


Amount of water. 


Duty of water. 


Year. 


Diverted. 


Wasted. 


Lost. 


Distrib- 
uted to 
farms. 


Gross. 


Net. 


1910 


Acres. 
27,562 
30, 139 
36,620 
43,075 
39,615 
40,295 


Acre-feet. 

177,577 
212,562 
164,063 
186,175 
268,028 
2«.fi03 


Acre-feet. 
12,570 
14,943 
1,496 
10,966 
49,568 
49,018 
54,429 
53,037 
38,918 


Acre-feet. 

36,758 
53,873 
82,656 
68, 2H 
80,356 
66,440 
78,964 
vS5,021 
101,464 


Acre-feet. 
128,249 
143,746 
86,611 
106,975 
138, 104 
118,235 
130,793 
125,375 
126,545 


Feet. 
6.00 
6.56 
4.48 
5.68 
6.77 
5.80 
6.69 
5.27 
6.31 


Feet. 

4.65 


1911 


4.48 


1912 


2.50 


1913 


2.25 


1914. 


3.28 


1915 


2.94 


1916. 


39,449' 264,' 186 
40,392 1 263,4.33 
42,311 , 266,927 


3.32 


1917 


3.06 


1918 


2.09 






Mean 


' 








5.90 


3.29 


















The irrigation season of 1918 opened March 20 and closed October 
15. During this period the Truckee and ** V and '*T'' Canals were 
operated continuously for the delivery of water to 648 farms con- 



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NEVADA, KEWLA2n)S (FORMERLY TRUOKEB-OARSON ) PROJECT. 231 

taining 42,311 acres of irrigated land. This was the lai^est area 
irrigated in the history of the project. During the irrigation season 
355.8 miles of canal were operated and maintained, comprising 77.3 
miles of main canal of over 300 second-feet capacity and 278.5 miles 
of main and distributing laterals. Service was unmtemipted imder 
the main canals. The Truckee Canal was also operated continuously 
throughout the winter for delivery of water to the Lahontan power 
plant and storage in Lahontan Reservoir. 

The operation was carried on by the water master, assisted by 1 
hydrographer, 3 gate tenders, and 12 ditch riders. 

Maintenance, — The ditch cleaning and structure repair work was 
done for the most part during the nonirrigation season. During the 
year 72 miles of canal and laterals and 2} miles of open drain were 
cleaned. The lateral cleaning was done largelv usmg teams and 
fresno scrapers. A drag-line excavator was used, to clean the main 
canals and the open dram. Trees and willows were also pulled from 
the banks of 9 miles of main canal during the irrigation period. 
About 34 old structures were replaced by new ones and 86 structures 
of various types repaired. 

Considerable trouble was experienced with moss and other aquatic 
plant growth in the shallower canals and laterals. A force consisting 
of about 16 head of stock and 8 to 10 men was occupied almost 
continuously after July 1 in dragging heavy anchor chains and spring- 
tooth harrows through the ditches and mowing with hand scythes. 

Beyond the burning of tules and weeds and removing material 
washed into the various open drains, very little maintenance work 
was done. 

One new ditch rider's house was built and repairs, such as papering 
and addition of screen porches, made on several old houses. 

Water meters were installed at the Southern Pacific Kailroad Co.'s 
water-tank take-outs from the Truckee Canal at Gilpin and Hazen 
in order to determine accurately the quantity of water used and if 
it is in excess of the company's vested right of 200,000 gallons per 
day. 

Two new Monighan drag-line excavators were received and placed 
on cleaning and strengthening the banks of the Truckee ana **T" 
Canals. 

A cut-off trench about 330 feet long and 19 feet deep, to serve as 
a drain for the protection of the ^'Ky'' lateral flume and chute, was 
excavated during January, 1919. A new timber chute was installed 
to replace the old metal chute on this lateral. 

On April 22, 1919, a new Monighan draff-line excavator was received 
and unloaded at Lahontan. This macnine cleaned the Lahontan 
power plant fore bay and the lower end of the Truckee Canal above 
the chute during April and May. 

The Reclamation Service and commimity suffered a severe loss on 
November 20, 1918, in the death of Supt. of Irrigation James G. 
Gault. Mr. Gault had been employed on the project almost since 
its inception. 

Considerable difficulty was experienced in procuring sufficient labor 
during the war period, o^dng to the farmers on the project offering 
better wages than paid by the Reclamation Service. At present, 
however, wiere is an abundance of labor available, but the Govern- 
ment is obliged to pay the farmers' scale of about $4.50 per day. 



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232 EIGHTEENTH AKNTJAL REPOBT OP BECLAMATION SERVIOE. 



Hiatorioal review, Newhnds project. 



Item. 



1914 



1915 



1916 



1917 



1918 



To Jime 
?.0, 1919. 



Acreage for which service was prepared to 

supply water 

Acreage irri«?ate .d 

Miles of (»DaI operated 

Water diverted (acre-feet) 

Water delivered to land (acre-feet) 

Per acre of land irrigated (acre-feet) , 



52,039 
39,615 
300 
268,028 
138,104 
a. 28 



65,000 
40,29.1 
304 
233, 69 1 
118,235 
2.94 



70,915 
39,449 
306 
264,188 
130,793 
3.32 



70,915 
40,392 
355 
263, 4 3-^ 
125,375 
3.05 



71,817 
42,311 
356 
286,927 
126,545 
2.99 



65,752 

45,000 

360 



SETTLEMENT. 

During the fiscal year ending June 30, 1919, 28 homesteads aggre- 
gating 1,973 acres of land were entered. Fourteen water-right apj)li- 
cations, covering 771 acres of irrigable land in private ownership, 
were filed and 4 Carson River water-rights were settled, amounting 
to 1,052 acres of irrigable land, making a total of 3,796 acres. Against 
the above figures are recorded 3 cancellations covering 141 acres, 
leaving a net gain of 3,655 acres over the preceding year. 

The status of available land on the project has been very dis- 
couraging to settlement during the year. Such public land as was 
open to entry has been on the farm unit plats for a number of years 
and is scattered in isolated tracts over practicallv the entire project. 

By this process the best of the avaUaole land has been picRed out 
until there is nothing subject to homestead entry that will attract 
settlement. 

The private land subject to water-right application remaining on 
the farm unit plats bears an accrued penalty of $12 per acre, maSing 
the water-right cost $72 an acre. 

Numerous prospective settlers have looked these lands over and 
decided to go elsewhere or wait until new lands are opened at the $60 
rate of construction charge. 

Under these circumstances the showing made for the fiscal year 
ending June 30, 1919, is considered good, as the increase in acreage 
was made by prospective settlers going over the project and finding 
a tract of land to suit them and asking to have the tracts opened for 
filing, which has been done in every case. 

The high prices for farm produce have started a strong '^forward 
to the farm*' movement, so with a plentiful supply of water and a 
new tract of good land, which should be opened for filing under the 
Lahontan Reservoir, the Newlands project would grow and prosper 
as it should. 

Settlement data, Newlands project, Nevada. 



Item. 



1914 



1915 



1916 



1917 



1918 



1919 



Total number of farms on project 

Population 

Nimiber of irri?ated farms 

Operated by owners or managers 

Operated by tenants 

Population 

Nimiber of towns 

Population 

Total population towns and on forms 

Number of public schools 

Number of churches , 

Number of banks 

Total capital stock 

Amount of deposits 

Number of depositors 



494 

1,6^5 

494 

439 

55 

1,635 

4 

1,250 

2,885 

19 



9100,000 

1350,000 

650 



540 

1,867 

540 

480 

60 

1,867 

4 

1,400 

3,267 

20 

8 

1 

1100,000 

$300,000 

700 



584 

2,022 

584 

514 

70 

2,022 

1,360 

3,382 

18 

9 

1 

S100,000 

$342,000 

700 



600 

2,197 

600 

525 

75 

2,197 

1,860 

4,057 

16 

7 

2 

$116,000 

$371,240 

775 



610 

2,225 

610 

50 

80 

2,225 

1,900 

4,125 

14 

7 

2 

$116,000 

$632,000 

1,214 



67 i- 

2,26» 

675 

505 

80 

2,26ft 

2,24(^ 

4,50a 

Ul 

7 

2 

$150,000 

$790,000 

1,860 



1 Schools consolidated. 



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NEVADA, NEWLANDB (FORMERLY TRUCKEB-CARSON ) PROJECT. 233 
WATBB TTSBBS' ACTIVITIES. 

On October 8, 1918, foDowing the filing of the necessary bond and 
fulfilling other requu^ements, the board of county commissioners of 
ChurchUl County, Nev., panted the water users' petition for the 
organization of an irrigation district under the Nevada State law 
and called an election for November 16 to allow the landowners and 
water users an opportunitv to indicate their desires in the matter. 
The result was 256 votes for and 45 votes against the formation of 
such district, the affirmative votes being sufficient for formation. 

The following board of directors was elected for the various divi- 
sions: W. A. Pray, Fernley; True Vencil, Old River; W. A. Harmon, 
Harmon; C. E. Kent, Stillwater; Ben Holmes, jsland; C. E. Coe, 
Sheckler; and Edmund Dietz, Northam. The official name of the 
organization is the ^^Truckee-Carson irrigation district.^' 

On December 9, 1918, Edmund Dietz, of the Northam district, 
was elected president of the board and C. E. Coe, of the Sheckler 
district, was selected as secretary. 

PBIKCIFAL CBOPS. 

Alfalfa continues to be the predominating cr\)p, with grain, pota- 
toes, and garden truck next in order of importance. The fall crop 
census reported a total of 25,267 acres planted to alfalfa, of which 
amount 3,725 acres was new seeding planted in 1918. The total 
yield of 77,442 tons from the old afialfa was about 6,000 tons in 
excess of the highest previous record. The maximum yield reported 
was 7i tons per acre. Most of the crop was sold in the stack during 
the summer to stock feeders at pric^ ranging from $12 to $21. Two 
alfalfa meal mills were erected during the year and have operated 
continuously since their completion. 

Grain consisted, as in previous years, almost exclusively of wheat 
and barley. The acreage plantea to grain in 1918, of 6,522 acres, 
was about doiuble that planted in 1917. The table of crop yields 
shown below indicates that the average otoss income per acre from 
grain lands was only $35.41 for wheat ana $25.97 for barley, as com- 
pared with $57.60 per acre for alfalfa. 

Potatoes were not as successful in 1918 as the previous year, due 
probably to lack of enthusiasm on the part of the growers owing to 
the uncertain market conditions. 

Those farmers having potato storage cellars held over as much of 
this crop as possible, hoping for better prices in the spring, but were 
disappK)inted. 

Fruit and garden truck was very profitable owing to the extremely 
long growing season. Apples and cherries were imusually plentiful, 
especially apples, of whicn some 2,000 boxes were marketed. The 
local markets consumed most of the garden produce except tomatoes, 
sweet corn, and cantaloupe, which were shipped out in lai^ quan- 
tities. 

The cantaloupe industry continues to grow in importance each 
year, one farmer alone shipping out over 500 crates in 1918, which 
were marketed at fancy prices. 

Honey production amounted to 160,000 pounds in 1918, which 
was sold at about 20 cents per pound as strained honey. Several 
new apiaries were established during the year. 



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234 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL BEPORT OF RECLAMATION SEBVICB. 

Dairying and stock raising were at a standstill during the past 

?ear. The local creamery after being purchased by the Nevada 
acking Co., of Reno, Nev., was discontinued except as a receiving 
station. The stock-raising industry will probably revive during the 
coming year or two, owing to the creation of a commimity pasture 
of some 15,000 acres in the neighborhood of Carson Lake. 

Crop report^ Newlands project^ Nevada^ year of 1918, 



Crop. 



Values. 



Area 

(acres). 



Unit of 
yield. 



Per acre. 



Alfalfa 21,642 

Barley , 1,374 

Garden and miscellaneous 
crops , 

Oats 

Potatoes 

Wheat 

Hay (grass and grain) 

Alfalfa (seeded 1918) 

Pasture (wild grass) 

Pasture (alfalfa after cut- 
ting) 

Less duplicated areas 



Total cropped acreage. 



Irrigated, no crop 

Total irrigated acreage. 




&32 
44 

334 
5,024 
1,124 
3,725 
9,662 



41,490 



Total and average I 1,630, 142 



153.15 



Areas. 



Acres, i Farms. 



' Percent 
j of project. 



821 ' Total irrigable area farms reported. 
Total irrigated area farms reported. 



I 



42,311 i Total cropped area farms reported. 



60,946 I 

42,311 

41,490 



648 I 29.59 

648 20.53 

t 2ai4 



i For crops m full production. For all crops, $39.30. 
PUBLIC NOTICES AND OBDEBS. 



PUBLIC NOTICE, JULY 9, 1918. 

1. Land for which water will be furnished. — In pursuance of sec- 
tion 4 of the reclamation act of June 17, 1902 (32 Stat., 388), and of 
acts amendatory thereof or supplementary thereto, notice is hereby 

fiven that upon proper application being made therefor, water will 
e furnished under tne Truckee-Carson project, Nevada, in the irri- 
fation season of 1918 and thereafter, for the irrigable lands of the 
rW. i of sec. 24, T. 17 N., R. 28 E., M. D. M., shown on a diagram, 
approved January 4, 1918, by the Reclamation Commission, amenda- 
tory of a farm-unit plat of said township approved by the department 
August 17, 1914. Copies of the amendatory diagram and township 
plat are on file at the office of the project manager. United Stateia 
Reclamation Service, at Fallon, Nev., and at the local land office at 
Carson City, Nev. 

2. Water-tight application. — ^Water-right application for lands in 
private ownership snown on said diagram mav be made on or after 
the date of this public notice. The limit for which water-right 
application may be made for lands in private ownership shall be 
160 acres of irrigable land for each land owner. 

3. Classes of charges for water rights> — The water-right charges 
are of two kinds, to wit: (1) A charge against each irrigable acre 



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NEVADA^ NBWLANDS (FORMEBLY TBUOKEB-OABSOH ) FBOJBOT. 235 

to cover cost of conatruction of the irrigation system, termed the 
construction charge; and (2) an annual charge against each irrigable 
acre to cover cost of operation and maintenance of the system, 
termed the operation and maintenance charge. 

4. Constmction charge. — ^The construction charge shall be $60 per 
acre of irrigable land. Five per cent of the construction charge shaU 
be paid at the time of filing water-right application, and the re- 
mainder of the construction charge shall be paid in 15 annual install- 
ments, the first 5 of which shall each be 5 per cent and the remainder 
each 7 per cent of the total construction cnarge. The first of said 15 
annual installments shall become due and payable December 1 of 
the fifth calendar year after the initial installment, and subsequent 
installments shall become due and payable on December 1 of each 
calendar year thereafter. 

5. Increased constmction charge in certain cases. — In all cases 
where water-right application for lands in private ownership shall 
not be made within one year after the date of this notice, the con- 
struction charge for such lands shall be increased 5 per cent each 
year until such appUcation is made and an initial installment paid. 

6. Advance payment of constmction charge pernussible. — ^A water- 
right apphcant may, at his option, pay m advance the whole or 
any part of the construction charge owing by him within any shorter 
period than that prescribed by this notice. 

. 7. Operation and maintenance charge. — ^The ope^ration and main-* 
tenance charge for the irrigation season of 1918 and thereafter until 
further notice shall be of the same amount b& for other like lands 
imder the same project. Such charge shall be. due and payable on 
March 1 of each calendar jear for the preceding irrigation season; 
but where water-right apphcation is made for land in private owner- 
ship after August 1, no operation and maintenance charge will be 
made for water delivered during the remainder of the irrigation 
season in which the water-right application is made. 

8. Place and manner of payment of water charges. — ^All water-right 
chaises must be paid at the office of the United States Reclamation 
Service at Fallon, Nev., in cash, or by Nev York draft, or money 
order, payable to the special fiscal agent. United States Reclamation 
Service. 

S. G. Hopkins, 
Assistant Secretary of the IrUerior. 

PUBLIC NOTICE, AUGUST 14, 1918. 

1. Lands for which water will be furnished. — In pursuance of sec- 
tion 4 of the reclamation act of June 17, 1902 (32 Stat., 388), and of 
acts amendatory thereof or supplementary thereto, notice is herebv 
given that upon proper appUcation being made therefor, water will 
be furnished under tne Truckee-Carson project, Nevada, in the irri- 
gation season of 1918 and thereafter, for the irrigable lands of lots 
1 and 2, sec. 19, T. 19 N., R. 31 E., M. D. M., shown as a part of 
farm unit **L" on a diagram, approved on the date of this notice by 
the Reclamation Commission, amendatory of a farm-unit plat of said 
township approved by the department January 28, 1916. Copies of 
the amendatory diagram and township plat are on file at the office 
of the project manager. United States Reclamation Service, at 
Fallon, Nev., and at the local land office at Carson City, Nev. 



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236 EIOHTEEKTH ANHTUAL BEPOBT OF BECLAMATIOK^ SEBVICB. 

2. Entry for public land. — ^Homestead entry for the public lands 
embraced in the farm unit shown on said plat as amended, and aa 
described above, may be made on and after the date of this notice* 
at said local land office at Carson City, Nev., if found regular ana 
accompanied by the certificate of the project manager showing that 
water-right application has been filed and the proper water-right 
charges deposited. 

3« Limit of area for which water right may be secured. — ^The limit 
of area per entry representing the acreage which in the opinion of 
the Secretary of the Interior may be reasonably required for the 
support of a family upon such lands is fixed as shown upon said plat. 

4. Application for water right. — Water-right appUcation must be 
made to the project manager, United States Reclamation Service, 
Fallon, Nev., upon form provided for that purpose. Apphcation 
must be accompanied by the proper initial water-right pajmaent, 
which wiU be accepted by the proiect manager in the form of New 
York draft or money order payable to special fiscal agent, United 
States Reclamation Service, Fallon, Nev., or in currency. Water- 
right application must be for the specific farm unit. 

5. Classes of charges for water rights. — The water-right chaises 
are of two kinds, to wit: (1) A charge against each irrigable acre to 
cover cost of construction of the irrigation ^stem, termed the con- 
struction charge; and (2) an annual charge against each irrigable 
acre to cover cost of operation and maintenance of the sjrstem, 
termed the operation and maintenance charge. 

6. Construction charge. — ^The construction charge shall be $60 per 
acre of irrigable land. Five per cent of the construction charge shall 
be paid at the time of filing water-right application, and the re- 
mainder of the construction cnarge shalfbe paid in 15 annual install- 
ments, the first 5 of which shall each be 5 per cent and the remainder 
each 7 per cent of the total construction charge. The first of said 
15 annual installments shall become due and payable December 1 of 
the fifth calendar year after the initial installraent, and subsequent 
installments shall become due and payable on December 1 of each 
calendar year thereafter. 

7. Advance payment of constmction charge permissible. — ^Any 
water-right appUcant may, at his option, pay in advance the whole 
or any part of the construction charge owing by him within any 
shorter period than prescribed by this notice. 

8. Operation and maintenance charge. — The operation and main- 
tenance charge for the irrigation season of 1918 and thereafter until 
further notice shall be of the same amount as for other like lands 
under the said project. Such chaise wiU be due and payable on 
March 1 of each year for the precedmg irrigation season. 

9. Place and manner of payment of water charges. — ^All water-right 
chaises must be paid at the office of the United States Reclamation 
Service at Fallon, Nev., in cash, or by New York draft, or money 
order, payable to the special fiscal agent, United States Reclama- 
tion Service. 

E. C. Bradley, 
Assistant to the Secretary of the Interior. 



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NEVADA, NEWLAKDS (FOBMERLY TRUCKEB-CARSON ) PROJECT. 287 
ORDER, SEPTEMBER 24, 1918. 

The Secretary of the Interior 

(Through the Commissioner of the General Land Office). 

Sir: Pursuant to departmental authority of August 27, 1914, there 
are submitted for your approval, as involving variations in excess of 
10 per cent of the irriccable area of each plat, the following proposed 
changes consisting of the elimination of reduction of the irrigable 
acreage of various farm imits and private lands. This will eliminate 
from the second unit of the project all (1) unentered public lands, and 
(2) private lands for which water-risrht application has not been made. 

It is deemed advisable to exclude these lands from entry and 
irrigation until several factors of uncertainty can be adjusted and 
afford a reliable basis for computins: charges so as to make up the 
proportionate share of the present deficit in the operation and main- 
tenance charge under the project. Among the matters to be settled 
are the amount of the Government's storage in Lake Tahoe, the 
Government's water right in the Truckee River, the removal of the 
railroad between Lake Tahoe and Truckee City, and the organization 
of an irrigation district to handle the subject of drainage on this 
project. 

Second Unit^-Truckee-Cakson Project, Nevada, 
farm units. 

T. 19N.,R. 27E.: 

Sec. 13, farm units H, J, K, L. 

Sec. 15, farm units G, H, J. 

Sec. 22, farm unit B. 

Sec. 29, farm unit A. 
T. 18N., R. 28E.: 

Sec. 6, farm unit G. 
T. 19N., R. 28E.: 

Sec. 18, farm units G and H. 

Sec. 19, farm units F, G, H, J. K. 

Sec. 17, fann unit E. 

Sec. 20, farm units F, H, K, L. 

Sec. 21, fann unite G, H, J, K. 

Sec. 24, farm unit H. 

Sec. 32, farm unit P. 
T. I8N.,R. 29E.: 

Sec. 3, farm units C, D, E. 

Sec. 4, farm units M, N. 

Sec. 6, farm unit H. 

Sec. 10, farm units M, N, P. 

Sec. 12, farm units L, N. 

Sec. 13, farm units H, K. 
T I9N., R. 29E.: 

Sec. 8, farm units G, H. 

Sec. 16, farm unit F. 
T. I9N., R. 30E.: 

Sec. 18, farm unit J. 

Sec. 23, farm unit N. 

Sec. 23, farm imit M (and sec. 26). 

Sec. 23, farm unit L (and sec. 26). 

Sec. 24, farm units R, N, P. 

Sec. 27, farm units H, J. 

Sec. 28, farm units P, Q. 

Sec. 30, farm units K, L. 



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238 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RBC5LAMATI0N SERVICE. 

PRTVATB LAND8. 

T. 19N.. R. 27E.: 

Sec. 14, SW. J SE. J, 

Sec. 22, N. i NE. f 

Sec. 23, NW. h NE. J. 

Sec. 24, W. i NE. i, E. ) NW. i, NW. } SE. i. 
T. 17N., R. 28E.: 

Sec. 1, W. 4 SW. i, SE. i SW. }, lota 3 and 4, S. J NW. J. 

Sec. 12, N. i, N. h SW. i, SW. i SW.i, SE.J. 

Sec. 13, NW. i NW. i, S. i NW. i, NE. i NE. i. 
T. 18N., R. 28E.: 

Fee. 1, lot 4, SE. J NW }. 

Sec. 2, lots 2, 3, and 4, S. 4 NW. i, N. J SW. f SE. }. 

Sec. 3, lots 1, 2. and 4, SW. { NE. }, SW. J NW. i, NE. J SW. J, SE. }. 

Sec. 10, E. J NE. i, NE. i SE. i, NE. i SE. i SE. J. 

Sec. 11, W. J NW. i, W. i SW. J, SE. J SW. J, N. ) SE. }, SE. i SE. f 

Sec. 12, SW. i, SE. i NE. i, E. J SE. i. 

Sec 13 W i 

Sec! U] NW.*}, N. i NE. f SW. } NE. }. N. 4 SE. }. 

Sec. 15, N. 4 SE. i, SW. } SE. J. 

Sec. 23, SE. } NE. i, E. 4 SW. }. SW. } SW. h SE. \. 

Sec. 24, N W. }, E. 4 SE. }; 30 acres in N W. i SE. }, reducing total area to 10 ; 
8 acres in SW. J SE. i, reducing total area to 30. 

Sec. 25, N. 4 NE. i, W. 4 NE. } NW. i, W. 4 NW. }, W. 4 SE. i NW. i 
(18 acres), SW. J. 
T 19 N R 28 E " 

S^'c. 24, NE. i SE. }, S. 4 SE. f SE. i SW. }. 

Sec. 25, W. 4 SW. i, NE. 4- NW. i, W. 4 NW. J. 

Sec. 26, S. 4 NE. i, SE. } SE. }; 10 acres in SE. J NW. }, reducing tlie total 
area to 17. 

Sec. 27, S. 4 NW. i, SW. i SW. i, E. 4 SW. i, SE. J. 

Sec. 28, SW. J, NW. } SE. i, S. 4 SE. }. 

Sec. 29, E. 4 SE. i and W. 4 NW. {. 

Sec. 30, lot 2, N. 4 NE. f SE. } NE.}. 

Sec. 33, N. 4 NW. }, NE. i NE. i, NE. } SE. J. 

Sec. 34, S. 4 NE. i, NE. i NW. i, E. 4 SW. i, SE. i SE. }. 

Sec. 35, NE. | NE. i, W. 4 SW. }. 

Sec. 36, NW. i, N. 4 SE. }. 
T. 17N., R. 29E.: 

Sec. 7, lot 3, SE. } SW.i, S. 4 SE. }. 

Sec. 8, NW. }, NW. } SE. }. 

Sec. 18, lot 1, E. 4 NE. i, SW. i NE. }, NE. i NW. }, SE. } SW. }, NW. J 
SE. }. 
T. 18N., R. 29E.: 

Sec. 2, lot 4, S. 4 SW. }. 

Sec. 3, lots 1 and 4, S. 4 NE. }, N. 4 SE. f 

Sec. 4,lot 1. 

Sec. 11, 5 acres in NE. } NW. }, reducing the total area to 30. 

Sec. 17, SW. i NE. }, S. 4 NW. }, N. 4 SW. 1, W. 4 SE. }. 

f^ec. 18, SE. i NE. J, SE. \ SW. }. 

Sec. 19, 7 acres in lot 1, reducing the total area to 17; 9 acres in lot 2, reduc- 
intr the total area to 28. 
T. 19X., R. 29E.: 

Sec. 3, lots], 2. 3,4. 

Sec. 4, S. 4 NE. f S. 4 NW. f SW. }. 

Sec. 5, SE. i NK. }, NE. } SE. }. 

Sec. 8, NE. i SE. }, S. J SE. }. 

Sec. 9, W. 4. 

Sec. 17, E. 4 NE. }, NW. } NE. i, NW. i, N. 4 SE. i, SW. i SE. }, S. i 
SW. }. 

Sec. 19, lot 3, SE. } NW. i, NE. } SW. }. 

Sec. 20, NW. } NW. }. 

Sec. 28, SW. } SE. ^ S. 4 SW. }. 

Sec. 29, N. 4 SE. i, SE. i SE. }, N. J SW. i, SW. i SW. }. 

Sec. 30, S. 4 NE. }. SE. i SE. }. 

Sec. 31, lots 3 and 4, E. 4 NE. J, E. 4 SW. }. 

Sec. 32, N. 4, SE. { SE. }. 



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NEVADA, NBWLANDS (FORMERLY TRUCKBE-CARSON ) PROJECT. 239 

T. 19 N., R. 29 E.—Continued. 

Sec. 33, N. i NE. J. SW. J NE. J, SW. i NW. i, N. } SW. }, SE. J. 

Sec. 34, W. } NW. \, W. J SW. i, SE. i SW. i, S. } SE. }. 

Sec. 35, E. } NW. i, SW. i NW. i, SW. i NE. i, SW. i SW. J. 

Sec. 36, SW. J NW. f 
T. 19N., R. 30E.: 

Sec. 1, lot 4, S. J NE. {, N. i SE. i, SE. J SF. }. 

Sec. 12, NW. i NE. {, NW. i NE. i SE. i. 

Sec. 13, NE. } NW. J. 

Sec. 14, SW. i NE. J. E. J SW. }, NW. { SE. i, SE. J SE. i. 
T. 19 N., R. 31 E.: 

Sec. 6, lots 6 and 7. 

Sec. 7, lots 1. 2, 3, and 1, E. } NE. i, SW. } NE. }, NE. i NW. J, NE. i 
SW. i, N. J SE. i SE. J SE. i. 

Sec. 8, N. 4 NE. J, SW. i NE. i, NE. i NW. i, SW. } NW. J, SE. J SW. J 
S. iSW. }, NW. JSE. }. 

It is respectfully recommended that the foregbmg eliminations and 
changes be approved and that the Commissioner oi the General Land 
Office be directed to have the records of his office and of the local 
land office changed in accordance herewith. 
Respectfully submitted. 

A. P. Davis, 
Director and Chief Engineer, 
October 1, 1918. 
Recommendation approved. 
E. C. Bradley, 

Assistant to the Secretary, 

PUBLIC NOTICE, DECEBiBER 3, 1918. 

1. Land for which water will be furnished. — In pursuance of the 
provisions of section 4 of the reclamation act of June 17, 1902 (32 
Stat., 388), and of acts amendatory thereof or supplementary thereto, 
notice is hereby given that water will be furnished under the Truckee- 
Carson project, Nevada, in the irrigation season of 1918 and there- 
after, for the hrigable lands of the SW. } SW. } sec. 5, T. 19 N., R. 27 
E., M. D. M., in the second unit of said project, shown on a farm-unit 
plat of said township approved August 17, 1914, and amended on 
the date of this notice, copies thereof being on file at the office of the 
project manager, United States Reclamation Service at Fallon, 
Nev., and at the local land office at Carson City, Nev. 

2. Water-ri|^ht application for land in private ownership. — Water- 
right application for lands in private ownership included in said 
second unit in the SW. } SW. } sec. 5 may be made on or after the 
date of this pubUc notice. The limit for which water-right applica- 
tion may be made for lands in private ownership shall be 160 acres 
of irrigable land for each landowner. 

3. Classes of charges for water rights. — ^The water-right charges are 
of two kinds, to wit: (1) A chaise against each irrigable acre to cover 
cost of construction of the irrigation sjstem, termed the construction 
charge; and (2) an annual charge against each irrigable acre to cover 
cost of operation and maintenance of the system, termed the operation 
and mamtenance charge. 

4. Constrnction charge. — ^The construction charge shall be $60 per 
acre of irrigable land, payable as follows: Five per cent of the con- 
struction charge shall be paid at the time of filing water-right appUca- 



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240 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SBRVICB. 

tion, and the remainder of the construction charge shall be paid in 
15 annual instalments, the first 5 of which shall each be 5 per cent 
and the remainder each 7 per cent of the total construction charge. 
The first of said 15 annual instalments shall become due and payable 
December 1 of the fifth calendar year after the initial instalment, and 
subsequent instalments shall become due and payable on December 1 
of each calendar year thereafter. 

5. Increased constrnctioii charges in certain cases. — In all cases 
where water-right application for lands in private ownership shall 
not be made within one year from the date of this notice, the con- 
struction charge for such lands shall be increased 5 per cent each 
year until such application is made and an initial instalment paid. 

6. Advance payment of constrnction charges permissible. — A water- 
right applicant may, at his option, pay in advance the whole or any 
part of the construction charge owing by him within any shorter 
period than that prescribed by this notice. 

7. Operation and maintenance charge. — ^The operation and main- 
tenance charge for the irrigation season of 1918, and thereafter, until 
further notice, shall be of the same amount as announced for the 
lands of the Truckee-Carson project in the Femley and Hazen 
benches, Truckee-Carson project, in public notice of April 3, 1918. 
Such charge will be due and payable on March 1 of each year for the 
preceding irrigation season. 

8. Place and manner of payment of water charges. — All water-right 
charges must be paid at the oflfice of the United States Reclamation 
Service at Fallon, Nev., in cash, or by New York draft, or money 
order, payable to the special fiscal agent. United States Reclamation 
Service. 

E. C. Bradley, 
Assistant to the Secretary of the Ivierior, 

PUBLIC NOTICE, MARCH 6, 1919. 

1. Annnal operation and maintenance charges. — In pursuance of 
section 4 of the reclamation act of June 17, 1902 (32 Stat., 388), and 
acts amendatory thereof, or supplementary thereto, particularly of 
the reclamation extension act of August 13, 1914 (38 Stat., 686), 
announcement is herebjr made that the annual operation and main- 
tenance charges for the irrigation season of 1919 and thereafter until 
further notice against all lands of the Newlands project (formerly 
Truckee-Carson project), Nevada, under public notice, shall be as 
follows: 

(a) A minimum charge of $1.40 per irrigable acre will be made 
whether water is used tnereon or not, which charge will permit the 
delivery of not to exceed 3 acre-feet of water per irrigable acre upon 
lands of the Fernley and Hazen benches shown upon a map on file 
in the project office, and not to exceed 1^ acre-feet per irrigable acre 
upon the other lands of the project; and a charge of 50 cents per 
acre-foot per irrigable acre will be made for all additional water. 
These rates do not apply, however, to vested-right lands referred to 
in subdivision (6) following: 

(6) A charge of $1.50 per acre-foot per irrigable acre will be made 
for any water in addition to 3 acre-feet per urigable acre furnished 
to vested-right land, for which the contract adjusting the vested 



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KEYADA, NEWLAKDS (FOB])jlffiLY TBUOKJfeB-OABSON ) PROJECT. 241 

acreage provides that the United States is to deliver not to exceed 
3 acre-feet per irrigable acre at a fixed chaise of 40 cents per acre. 

All. operation and maintenance charges are due and payable on 
March 1 of each year for the {^receding irrigation season; but where 
water-rig^t application is made for public land entered imder the 
reclamauon law after June 15, or wnere water-right application is 
made after August 1 for land in private ownership, no operation and 
maintenance charged will be made for watar deliverea during the 
remainder of the irrigation season in which the water-right application 
is made. 

The foregoing chaises do not cover the water service through the 
stock-water supply pipes in the Fernl^ district, the charges for 
which service will be separately announced. 

S. G. Hopkins, 
Assistant Secretary of the Interior. 

PUBLIC NOTICE, APRIL 23, 1919. 

1. Land for which water will be fmmished. — In pursuance of the pro- 
visions of section 4 of the reclamation act of June 17, 1902 (32 Stat., 
388), and of acts amendatory thereof or supplementary thereto, 
notice is hereby given that upon proper water-nght application being 
made therefor, water will be furnished under the Newlands project, 
Nevada, in the irrigation season of 1919 and thereafter, for the irri- 
gable areas of the following described land, to wit: 

LAND IN PRIVATE OWNERSHIP. 

W. i SE. J, NE. J SW. J sec. 12. T. 17 N., R. 28 E., Mount Diablo meridian. 

SE. } SE. i sec. 29, T. 19 N., R. 28 E., Mount Diablo meridian. 

N. J NW. i sec. 33, T. 19 N., R. 28 E., Mount Diablo meridian. 

Lots 3-4, sec. 31, T. 20 N., R. 28 E., Mount Diablo meridian. 

E. J SW. } sec. 31, T. 20 N.. R. 28 E., Mount Diablo meridian. 

W. 1 SE. J aec. 31, T. 20 N., R. 28 E., Mount Diablo meridian. 

PUBLIC LANDS. 

SE. J SE. i sec. 36, T. 20 N., R. 27 E., Mount Diablo meridian. 

Lots 1-2, sec. 6, T. 19 N., R. 28 E., Mount Diablo meridian. 

Lot 5, SE. J NW. J. S. i NE. J sec. 6, T. 19 N., R. 28 E., Mount Diablo meridian. 

SE. J SW. } sec. 32, T. 19 N., R. 28 E., Mount Diablo meridian. 

Lot 1, NE. J NW. J sec. 18, T. 18 N., R. 30 E., Mount Diablo meridian. 

SW. J SW. i sec. 23, and 

NW. J NW. } ape. 26, T. 19 N., R. 30 E., Mount Diablo meridian. 

Diagrams, approved on the date of this notice, show the land above 
described, and are on file in the office of the project manager at Fallon, 
Nev., and in the local land office at Carson City, Nev. 

2. Limit of area for which water right may be secured. — The limit 
of area of public land per entry, representing the acreage which, in 
the opinion of the Secretary of the Interior, may be reasonably 
required for the support of a family upon such land, is fixed at the 
amounts shown upon the plats for the several farm units. The 
maximum limit of area for which water-right application may be 
made for land in private ownership shall be 160 acres of irrigable land 
for each land owner. 

3. Water-right application. — ^Water-right application must be filed 
in the office of the project manager. For land in private ownership 

138554—19 16 



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242 EIGHTEENTH ANittJiL-^EPCmT'^F RBCI^UTAT^ ^ 

such application may be made on and aftct tlte date of this notice; 
for public land such application must be made in accordance with the 
conditions hereinafter stated. 

4. Entry for public land. — Homestead entries may be made at said 
local land oflBlce for all farm units of public land shown on said plats, 
on and after 9 o^clock a. m., May 8, 1919, by pereons holding approved 
water-right applications. Every person desiring to acquire any of 
said public land must execute a water-right application upon a form 
provided for that purpose and accompany the same by payment of 
the water-right charge, as hereinafter provided. Each water-right 
application must be for a specified farm unit and more than one person 
may make such application for the same farm unit, but not more than 
one water-right application can be made by the same person. Such 
water-right application must be filed with project manager, United 
States Reclamation Service, Fallon, Nev., in person, by mail, or 
otherwise within a period of five days beginning May 3, 1919, to and 
including 9 o'clock a., m.. May 8, 1919. Water-right applications 
received after said period of five days will be filed and noted in the 
order of their receipt. 

5. Simnltaneons filing of water-right applications. — Water-right 
applications made and filed with the project manager during said 
five-day period will be held and treated as simultaneously filed and . 
the project manager will dispose of them as follows: 

(a) Where there is no conflict the water-right application will be 
approved by the project manager. • 

(b) Where there are two or more water-right applications for the 
same farm unit the project manager will write on cards the names of 
the several water-right applicants, and each of those cards containing 
the name of one such applicant will be placed in an envelope upon 
which there is no distinctive or identifying mark, and at 2 o'clock 
p. m., May 8, 1919, after all the envelopes containing the names of 
the several water-right applicants shall have been thoroughly mixed 
in the presence of such persons as may desire to be present, they will 
be drawn and numbered in order. The cards as drawn and numbered 
will be securely fastened to the water-right applications of the re- 
spective persons, and the water-right applications will be approved 
ih such order by the project manager. 

6. Approved water-right applications. — ^Approval by the project 
manager of a water-right apphcation for public land will entitle the 
water-right applicant to file homestead application at said local land 
office, for the farm unit described in his water-right application. Such 
homestead application should be made within four days from date of 
approval of water-right application. Failure to so make such home- 
stead application, will entitle the water-right applicant next in order 
for the same unit to have his water-right application approved by the 
project manager allowing him to make homestead application, this 
procedure continuing, if necessary, as to all applicants. No part of 
a payment made wul be returned to a successful applicant in any 
case, if he be a qualified homestead entryman. 

7. Failure of applicant to obtain public land applied for. — Where 
any applicant fails to obtain public land applied for by him he will be 
permitted to elect whether he will amend his application to embrace 
other land not affected by pending applications and otherwise subject- 
thereto when such amended application is presented, or withdraw 



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NEVADA, KBWLAITDS (FOBMBBLY TRUOKBB-CABSON ) PROJECT. 243 

his original appUcatdoa without prejudice. In the event of such with- 
drawal the water-right chaises deposited will be returned by the 
project manager upon surrender of the receipt therefor. 

8. Wanung against unlawful settlement upon public land. — No 
person will be permitted to gain or exercise any right whatever undw 
any settlement or occupation of any of said public land, begun without 
having at the time, a valid approved water-right application covering 
the land in question; provided, however, that this shall not aflfect 
any valid existing right obtained by settlement or entry while the land 
was subject thereto. 

9. Classes of charges of water right. — The water-right chaises 
against all of said lands are of two kinds, to wit: (a) A charge against 
each irrigable acre to cover cost of construction of the irrigation sys- 
tem, termed the construction charge, and (b) an annual charge 
against each irrigable acre to cover cost of operation and maintenance 
of the system, termed the operation and maintenance charge. 

10. Constmction charge. — The construction charge for said land 
shall be $60 per irrigable acre. An initial payment of 5 per cent of 
the construction charge shall be made at the time of filing water-right 
application, and the remainder of the construction charge shall be 
paid in 15 annual installments, the first 5 of which shall each be 5 per 
cent and the remainder each 7 per cent of the total construction 
charge. The first of said 15 annual installments shall become due 
and payable December 1 of the fifth calendar year after the initial 
installment, and subsequent installments shall become due and 
payable on December 1 of each calendar year thereafter. 

11. Advance uayment of constmction charge permissible. — ^Any 
water-right applicant or entryman may, if he so elect, pay the 
^hole or any part of the construction charge owing by him within 
any shorter period than that provided by the public notices and orders 
applicable to his land. 

12. Operation and maintenance charge. — The operation and mainte- 
nance chai]ge for the irrigation season of 1919 and thereafter until 
further notice, shall be of tlie same amount as for other like land under 
the same project. Such charge will be due and payable on March 1 
of each year for the preceding irrigation seasons; but where water- 
right application is made for public land entered under the reclama- 
tion law after June 15, no operation and maintenance chaise will be 
made for water delivered during the remainder of the irrigation 
season in which the water-right application is made. 

13. Place and manner of payment of water charges. — ^AU water- 
right charges must be paid at the office of the United States Reclama- 
tion Service at Fallon, Nev., in cash or by New York draft, or money 
order, payable to the special fiscal agent. United States Reclamation 
Service. 

14. All land to be included in irrigation district. — The water-ri^ht 
applications for all land covered by this public notice not now within 
the Truckee-Carson irrigation district, and which may be now or 
hereafter lawfully brought thereunder, shall contain the following 
provision: 

The applicant agrees for himself and his successors to take appro- 

Eriate steps in coirformity with the laws of the State of Nevada, to 
ave the land above described included within the Truckee-CarsoD 
irrigation district. If, for 30 dajrs after notice is given him or hb 



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244 EIGHTEENTH ANNXJAIx REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

successor by the project manager of the Newlands project, to take 
any of such steps, he or his successor fails so to do, this water-right 
application may, at the option of the Secretary of the Interior, be 
canceled, with the forfeiture of all rights acquired thereunder and of 
all payments made thereof. 

John W. Hallowell, 
Assistant to the Secretary of the Interior. 

PUBLIC NOTICE, MAY 31, 1919. 

1. Land for which water will be furnished. — In pursuance of the 

Sro visions of section 4 of the reclapaation act of June 17, 1902 (32 
tat., 388), arid of acts amendatory thereof or supplementary thereto, 
notice is hereby given that upon proper water right application being 
made therefor, water will be furnished under the Newlands project, 
Nevada, in the irrigation season of 1919 and thereafter, for the irriga- 
ble areas of the foUowing described land, to wit: 

LAND IN PRIVATE OWNERSHIP. 

Lots 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, sec. 17, T. 17 N., R. 29 E., M. D. M. 

NE. i SE. i, SE. i SE. i, and SW. J SE. i, sec. 24, T. 19 N., R. 26 E., M. D. M. 

NE. J SE. i, sec. 24, T. 18 N., R. 28 E.. and lot 3, sec. 19, T. 18 N., R. 29 E., 

M. D. M. 
NW. i NE. J, sec. 30, T. 19 N., R. 28 E., M. D. M. 

PUBLIC LAND. 

Lot 6, NE. { SW.-i, secr 6, T. 19 N., R. 23 E., M. D. M. 

SE. h sec. 6, T. 19 N., R. 28 E., M. D. M. 

E^ SE. }, sec. 31, T. 20 N., R. 28 E., M. D. M. 

SW. i NE. i and W. i SE. }, sec. 5, T. 19 N., R. 28 E., M. D. M. 

^''Diagrams, approved on the date of this notice, show the land above 
described, and are on file in the oflBlce of the project manager at Fallon, 
Nev., and in the local land office at Carson City, Nev. 

2. Limit of area for which water right may be secured. — ^The limit 
of area of public land per entry, representing the acreage which, in 
the opinion of the Secretary of the Interior, may be reasonably 
required for the support of a family upon such land, is fixed at the 
amounts shown upon the plats for tne several farm units. The maxi- 
mum limit of area for which water-right application may be made 
for land in private ownership shall be 160 acres of irrigaWe land for 
each land owner. 

' 3. Water-right application. — Water-right application must be filed 
in the office of the project manager. F^t land in private ownership 
such application may be made on and after the date of this notice; 
for public land such application must be made in accordance with the 
conditions hereinafter stated. 

4. Entry for pnblie land. — Homestead entries may be made at said 
local land office for all farm xmits of public land shown on said plats, 
on and after 9 o^clock a. m., Jime 19, 1919, by persons holding 
approved water-right applications. Every person desiring to acquire 
any of said public land must execute a water-right application upon a 
form provicfed for that purpose and accompany the same by payment 
of the water-right charge as hereinafter provided. Each water-right 
application must be for a specified farm imit and more than one 



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NEVADA, NBWIiA2n)S (PORBiBRLY TRUCKBB-OARSON ) PROJECTT. 245. 

person may make such application for the same farm unit, but not- 
more than one water-rimt application can be made by the same^ 
person. Such water-right application must be filed with project 
manager, United States Keclamation Service, Fallon, Nev., in person, 
by mSl, or otherwise within a period of five days beginning Jime 14, 
1919, to and including 9 o'cIock a. m., June 19, 1919. Water-right 
applications received after said period of five days will be filed and 
noted in the order of their receipt. 

5. Simnltaneons filing of water-right applications. — Water-right 
applications made and filed with the project manager during said 
five-day period will be held and treatea as simultaneously filed and 
the project manager wiU dispose of them as follows: 

(a) Where there is no conflict the water-right application wiU be 
approved by the project manager. 

(6) Where there are two or more water-right applications for the 
same farm imit the.pcoject manager will write on oards-the names of 
the several water-right applicants, and each of those cards containing 
the name of one such applicant, will be placed in an envdope iipon 
which there is no distinctive or identifying mark, and at 2 o'clock 
p. m., Jime 19, 1919, after all the envelopes containing the names 
of the several water-right applicants shall have been thoroughly mixed 
in the presence of sucn persons as may desire to be present they will 
be drawn and nmmbered in order. The cards as drawn and numbered 
will be securely fastened to the water-right applications of the respec- 
tive persons, and the water-right appBcations will be approved in 
such order by the project manager. 

6. Approved water-right applications. — ^Approval by the project 
manager of a water-right application for puolio land will entitle tJie 
water-right applicant to file nomestead application at said local land 
office for the farm unit described in his water-right application. Such 
homestead application should be made within four days from date of 
approval of water-right application. Failure to so make such home- 
stead application, wfll entitle the water-right applicant next in order 
for the same unit to have his water-right appbcation approved by 
the project manager allowing him to make nomestead application^ 
this procedure continuing if necessary as to all applicants. No part 
of a payment made will be returned to a successiul applicant in any 
case, if he be a qualified homestead entryman. 

7. Failure of applicant to obtain pnblic land applied for. — Where 
any applicant f aife to obtain public land applied for by him he wiU 
be permitted to elect whether he will amend tus application to embrace 
other land not affected by pending applications and otherwise sub- 
ject thereto wl^en such amended application is presented, or with- 
draw his original application without prejudice In the event of 
such withdrawal the water-right charges deposited will be returned 
by the project manager upon surrender of the receipt therefor. 

8. Warning against nnlawfnl settlement npon pnblic land. — Mo- 
person will be permitted to gain or exercise any right whatever under 
any settlement or occupation of any of said public land, begim with- 
out having at the time a valid approved water-right application 
covering the land in question ; provicled, however, that this shall not 
affect any valid existing right obtained by settlement or entry while 
the land was subject thereto. 



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246 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL KEPORT OF REOLAMATIOK SERVICB. 

9. Classes of charges for water right. — ^The water-right charges 
against all of said land are of two kinds, to wit: (a) A char^ against 
-each irrigable acre to cover cost of construction of t^e irrigation 
system, termed the construction charge, and (6) an annual cnai^e 
against each irrigable acre to cover cost of operation and maintenance 
of the system, termed the operation and maintenance charge. 

10. Construction charge. — ^The construction charge for said land 
shall be $60 per irrigable acr^. An initial pajrment of 5 per cent of 
the construction chaise shall be made at the time of filing water- 
right application, and the remainder of the construction charge shall 
be paid in 15 annual installments, the first 5 of which shall each be 5 per 
cent, and the remainder each 7 per cent of the total construction 
charge. The first of the said 15 annual installments shall become 
due and payable December 1 of the fifth calendar year after the initial 
installment, and subsequent installments shall become due and pay- 
able on December 1 of each calendar year thereafter. 

11. Advance payment of constrnction charge permissible. — Any 
water-right applicant or entryman may, if he so elects, pay the whole 
or any part of the construction charge owinff by him within any 
shorter period than that provided by the public notices and orders 
applicable to his land. 

12.. Operation and maintenance charge. — ^The operation and main- 
tenance charge for the irrigation season of 1919 and thereafter until 
further notice, shall be of the same amount as for other like land 
under the said project. Such charge will be due and payable on 
March 1 of each year for the preceding irrigation season ; but where 
water-right application is made for public land entered under the 
reclamation law after June 15, no operation and maintenance charge 
will be made for water delivered, during the remainder of the irrigation 
season in which the water-right application Ls made. 

13. Place and manner of payment of water charges. — ^All water-right 
charges must be paid at the office of the United States Reclamation 
Service at Fallon, Nev., in cash or by New York draft, or money order, 
payable to the special fiscal agent, United States Reclamation Service. 

14. All land to be included in irrigation district. — ^The water-right 
applications for aU land covered hj this public notice not now within 
the Truckee-Carson irrigation district, and which may be now or here- 
after lawfully brought thereimder, shall contain the following 
provision: 

The applicant agrees for himself and his successors to take appro- 

Eriate steps in comormity with the laws of the State of Nevada, to 
ave the land above described included within the Truckee-Carson 
irrigation district. If for 30 days after notice is given him or his 
successor by the project manager of the Newlands project, to take 
any of such steps, he or his successor fails so to do, this water-right 
application may at the option of the Secretary of the Interior be 
canceled with the forfeiture of all rights acquired thereunder and of 
all payments made thereon. 

John W. Hallowell, 
Assistant to tJie Secretary of the Interior. 



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NEVADA, 2SrEWLANJ>S TFQBMBBIiy 3XUCKEB-CAES0N ) PKO JECT. 247 



FIKAKOIAL STATEHBNT. 



Condensed balance sheet, Newtands project, June SO, 1919. 

Cash $15,533.43 

Inventoiy of materials and supplies on hand 38,931.37 

Accounts receivable: 

Current accounts due 24,241.70 

Construction water-ri^t charges unaccrued 1,0)3,085.30 

Construction work contracted 8,250.00 

Gross.construction cost .•.^. $6,384,544.40 

Less construction revenue earnings .-.^ 14,403.67 

Net construction cost 8, 370, 1 41. 73 

Gross operation and maintenance cost 631 , 600. 42 

Less operation and maintenance earnings , 14,345.12 

617,255.30 



37,751.35 

23,78.3.43 

1,885,715.43 



Accounts payable •..•..-.^s. ^^^.....^ 

Contlnrent obllf^tions .....•..-..-......• 

Collections and contracts of specific amounts for repayments toreclamation fund. , 

Capital investment: 

Disbursement , transfer, and joint-construction vouchers received 7, 232, 763. 12 

Collection, transfer, refund, and joint-construction vouchers issued 1 , 052, 554. 50 

Net investment 6,180, 

Feature costs of Newlands project. 



Principal features. 



Examination and surveys: 

Pyramid division 

Truc^ee division «._ 

Fallon division ^ 

LovelocV Branch , 

Churchill Valley unit 

Reno Valley 

Upper Carson Valley 

Truclree River water-right adjudication. 



Storace system: 

Lahontan Reservoir. . 
Lake Tahoe storage. . 



Canal system: 

Divefsion Dam and main TrucVee Canal to Pyramid headworlrs. . 

Main Truclree Canal— Pyramid headwords to Lahontan Dam 

Carson diversion dam 

V Line Canal 

T Line Canal 



Lateral system: 

Truclree Canal laterals 

Femley stock water pipe line. . 

V line laterals 

T line laterals 

System of waste-water ditches.. 



Drainape system: 

Drainage Investigations. 

Femley drain 

Deep tile drains 

VUne drainage 



iFlood protection: Carson River diannel. 

Power system: 

Commercial power system 

Lahontan power house 



Fiscal year 
1919. 



Total to 
June 30, 1919. 



$840.44 



7,504.62 
9,282.43 



17,627.49 



$15,909.88 
19,536.44 

134,464.93 
11,648.79 
18,788.27 
3,847.64 
32,256.69 
40,856.00 



277,308.64 



14,844.44 
24,454.74 



1,468,823.41 
196,552.63 



89,299.18 



13,260.83 



6.99 
2,179.72 



15,447.54 



1,168.06 

i,«571.14 

7,016.25 

5,4.56.94 



1,665,376.04 



608,084.02 
1,026,501.77 

93,578.52 
446,552.84 

76,695.88 



2,251,413.03 



115,liai7 
26,241.41 
926,343.82 
139,973.10 
249,941.24 



13, 07a 11 



1,467,609.74 



13.049.66 
S»295.74 



8,154.00 



34,241.57 
23,866.98 
31,397.75 
20,012.15 



20,907.93 I 



109,-518.45 



131,821.37 



26,346.65 
138,511.52 



164,858.17 



» Deduct. 

* Gross cost for year, $9.40; credit, freight adjustments, $580.54; net credit for year, $57i. 14. 

* Gross cost for year, $809.61; credit, materials returned to storehouse, $1,105.35; net credit for year, 
1395.74. 



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248 EIGHtBENTS ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SBRVIOB. 
FeatiiTt costs of Newlands j^ro/ffi^— Continued. 



Principal features. 



Fiscal year 
1919. 



Total to 
June 30, 1910. 



Fannunitt: 

Surveys and miscellaneous 

Leveling (arm lands under contract 

Leveling tarm lands under public notice. . 
Settlement vested water rights 



12,083.75 

20,460.03 

467.14 

1,956.77 



S36,363.Q7 
23,820.92 
40;600.08 
11,867.31 



35,808.29 



103,100.38 



Permanent improvements: 

Experimental farm 

Headquarters and permanent buildings. 

Ditchriders' and gatetenders' houses 

Lands purchased 

Oovemment stock pasture 



10,213.08 
2,556.00 



05.05 



7,008.44 
80,131.11 
38,741.08 

0,008.85 
812.34 



31,884.30 I 



84,201.07 



Telephone system 

Operation and maintenance charges tranaferrad to and compounded with 
construction charges 



la&^i 



43,058.95 



Oross cost of construction features. , 



Balance in plant accounts 

Gross cost to June 30, 1919 ! 154,193.21 



Less revenue earned during construction period: 

Rental of buildings. 

Rental of grating and farming lands. 

Contractors' freight refunds 

Loss on hospital operations 

Loss on fanning operations 

Loss on other operations, unclassified 



Net oonstructlon cost, June 30, 1010. 



200.00 

1,203.01 

32a 80 

1104.32 

0,050.04 

114,108.74 



12,772.71 



150,905.03 



3,023.93 



0,388,053.87 



05,501.08 
0,384,544.40 



17,044.11 
31,239.70 
732.87 
13.153.04 
13.083.98 
130,070.18 



14,402.07 



0,370,141.78 



1 Deduct. 
StaUmtnt ofcosts^ by calendar years, Newlands project. 





Oswtroctioa. 


Operation and 

maintenance 

under public 

notice. 


Total cost. 


Year ending Dec 81— 

1902 to 1907 


13,722,316.15 

17.221.04 

1976.89 

80,572.19 

365,373.25 

668,324.06 

467,588.32 

456,192.82 

173,952.21 

22,826.29 

73,784.50 

162,394.39 

79,385.04 


• 190,431.57 
60,177.33 
113,008.14 
39,188.87 
48,325.21 
1108,989.11 
53,33L13 
45,902.61 
49,107.20 
47,774.45 
48,025.03 
86, 719. 10 
58,604.8» 


18,812,747.73 
7^398.37 


1908 


1909 


112,025.25 
119,761.00 
413,098.40 
559,334.05 
520,919.45 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1913 


1914 


• 502,095.43 


1915 


223 059.41 


1916 


70,000.74 
121,809.58 
249,113.40 
137,080i«3 


1917 


1918 


JAniiAry tO J^IPe 30, 1010 - . , ^ 




Subtotal 


6,288,953.37 
95,591.03 




0,920,553.70 
05,501.03 


Plant wconnts o" J""* 30, 1919 








Total 


6,384,544.40 


081,000.42 


7,010,144.83 





1 Deduct. 



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l^VABA, NBWLANDS (FOEMERLY TBUCKBE-CARSOK) PBOJEOT. 249 
Statement of coetMy by fiscal yean, Newlands project. 



•Construction. 



Operation and 

maintenance 

nnder miblio 

notice. 



Total cost. 



Year endmg June 30— 

1902 to 1907 

1908 

1909 

1910 

mi 

1912 

1913...; 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

1919 

Subtotal 

Plant aQCddxita.on Jtme^, 1919. 

Total 



$3,573,134.35 
242,801.86 

M107,04».46 
09,945.22 
138,866.51 
671,617.45 
454,587.53 
514,930.03 
400,371.22 

• U0,336.99 
46,610.29 
139,282.15 
154,193.21 



167,105.07 
57, no. 00 

124,066.40 
34,870.60 
47,123.04 
1 110,123.29 
52,354.98 
44,610.78 
46,313.22 
49,973.91 
33,181.45 
79,790.56 

104,626.61 



«, 



640,239.42 
300,517.86 
17^006.94 
104,815.91 
185,989.55 
561,495.16 
506,942.51 
559,540.81 
446,684.44 
30,636.92 
79,791.74 
219,072.71 
258,819.82 



6,288,953.37 
95,591.06 



6,920,JJ63.70 
06,591.03 



6,384,544.40 



681,600.42 



7,016,144.82 



1 Deduct. s Portion of flood expense transferred to operation and maintenance. 

Estimated cost of contemplated work, Newlands project, during fiscal year 1920. 



Features. 


S-^*-ture.| '^^^ 






$10,500 
53,200 


Storage system: Lake T'ahoe settlement and Truckee River <diannel surreys .... 




Onulf system: * 

Tnickee canal 


15,500 
1,250 
6,150 


TUne canal 




Installation of structures 






ii,96o 


Lateral system: 

Surveys, ...r.........^. ...... . 4. .^.a.*. . ^ .^. ^ 


1,000 
23,000 

2,500 
11 100 


V system laterals to ser^e Freeman rancii 




Downs lateral 


Mfnor laterftl eTttensiofw 








37,600 
1 000 


DrMn^e system 




Farm units . 




5,800 


Permanent improvements: 
• Completion of project sbops and yards at Fallon 


1,000 


Improvements to ditdirlckrs' stations 








11,000 

86,000 

2,000 


Operation and mamtenance under public notice 












TotU. : 


219,000 







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250 JEIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 
Operating cost and rtvenueSy Newlands project , to Dec. SI, 1918. 





Calendar year 1918. 


To end of calendar year 1918. 


Feature. 


Opera- 
tion. 


Mahite- 
nance. 


Total. 


Opera- 
tion. 


Malnte- m«*«i 
nance. ^''^^' 


C03T . 
Storage works: 

Lake Tahoe Reservoir 


VI845.51 
3,841.36 


i»$11.28 
679.93 


VS856.79 
4,521.29 


$3,818.34 
9,611.35 


! 

$56.74 $3,875.08 
4,092.38 , 13,703.73 


T/ahontnn Dam . , . ^ . . - - , . . 






2,995.85 


668.66 


3,664.50 


13,429.69 


4,149.12 1 17,678.81 


Canal systems: 

TrackeeCanal 

V line canal 


V 200. 43 

2,049.56 

688.55 


in. 238. 85 

8,700.26 

988.33 


1.1,439.28 
10,749.84 
1,676.88 


13,006.87 

13,923.90 

1,748.24 


1 
21.290.88 1 34,297.75 
26,725.74 ' 40,649.64 
8.999.37 10,747.61 


Tlinecanal 




2,537.70 


8,449.74 


10,987.44 


28,679.01 


57,015.99 


85,695.00 


Lateral sj^stem: 

Tnickec Canal district 

— V line canal district 


2,810.31 
6 760.45 


17,492.25 
33.969.67 
4,318.55 


20,302.56 

40.720.12 

5,137.76 


19,508.93 

96.621.43 

17,094.47 

629.01 


56,239.15 
182,071.63 
39,249.46 
4^7, 139. 24 


75,748.08 
278 693.06 


T lino canal district 


'819.21 


.'i6,.'m.93 
47,768.25 


Waste- water ditches 


Drainage system: 

Truckee district sur£ace drains. . 










10,879.97 


66,780.47 


66,160.44 


133,853.84 


324,609.48 


458,553.32 




43.56 

3,380.69 

8.80 


43.56 

3,380.69 

8.80 




1 
43.56 1 4.?-6A 


V district surface drains ' . . . I 




4,044.28 
1,090.99 


4,044.28 
1,808.28 


V district subsurface drains - - - - 


717.29 










3,433.05 


3,433.05 


717.29 


5,178.83 


5,896.12 






Jlood protection: Carson River 
channel 




1 
1 




2,148.77 


5 14« 77 






( 




Undistributed expenses: 

Milntenince aitch riders' houses 




2,473.67 


2,473.67 




2,759.47 
2,386.97 


2,759.47 


Betterment, year 1914, charged 
to niainteiiftnce - 






2,386.97 












2,473.67 


2,473.67 




6, 146. 44 


5,146.44 












Grosscost 


15,913.52 


70,805.58 


86,719.10 


176,679.83 398,338.63 


675,018.46 
1 2,022.93 


Less accrued and unpaid operation 
- and maintenance accruals trans- 
ferred to and added to construc- 
tion charge 












Netcost 


15,913.52 


70^806.58 


86.719.10 176,679.83 398,338.63 


572,995.53 




EKVENUES. 

Operation and maintenance charges 
accrued on contracts with water- 
right applicants 






73,683.34 

1308.85 

261.84 

936.77 

1,523.00 
826.78 






872,716.57 


Operation and n^aintenance charges 
paid in advance by water-right 

applicants. ...r-, rr-, 










42.70 


Operation and maintenance charges 
paid and forfeited by water-rl^t 
applicants 










1,502.21 

3,090.37 
3.402.17 


Penalties on operation and main- 
tenance charges accrued on con- 
tracts with water-ri^t applicants. 










Rental of land and buildings during 
operating period 










Rentals of irrigation water 










8.612.90 
905.08 


Other revenues, unclassified, earned 
during operating period 










Less discounts allowed on operation 
and maintenance charges accrued 
on contracts with water-right ap- 
plicants 






11,243.58 






13,225 41 












Total 


I 


75,578.80 






387,046.50 










Difference (deficit) 






11,140.30 






185.949.94 













1 Deduct. 

s Credits due to adjustment between operation and maintenance and power revenues for years 1915 
to 1917, Inclusive. 



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KEW MEXICO, CABLSBAD PBOJECT. 

L. E, Foster, project manager, Carbbad, N. Mex. 

LOCATION. 

County: Eddy. 

Townships: 18 to 24 S., Be. 25 to 29 E., New Mexico meridian. 
Bailroad: Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe System. 

Bailroad stations and estimated population, June 30, 1919: Carlsbad, 3,000; Otis, 
50; Loving, 250; Malaga, 75. 

WATER SUPPLY. 

Source of water supply: Pecos River. 
Area of drainage basin: 22,000 square miles. 

Annual run-oft in acre-feet of Pecos River at Carlsbad and Dayton (22,000 square 
miles) 1899 to 1918: Maximum, 912,000; minimum, 136,500; mean, 280,770 since 1905. 

AGBICTJLTX7BAL AND CLIMATIC CONDITIONS. 

Area for which the service is prepared to supply water, season of 1919: 24,990.6 acres. 

Area under water-right applications, season of 1919: 23,869 acres. 

Length of irrigating season: From March to November and two weeks in winter, 
260 days. 

Average elevation of irrigable area: 3,100 feet above sea level. 

Rainfall on irrigable area: 1901-1918, averas?e 14.27 inches; 1918, 7.86 inches. 

Range of temperature on irrigable area: —7** to 110° F. 

Character of soil of irrigable area: Pecos sandy loam with large lime content. 

Principal products: Alfalfa, cotton, grain crops, melons, peaches, pears, and mis- 
cellaneous fruits. 

Principal market^s: Carlsbad, N. Mex.; Denver, Colo.; Chicago, 111.; Kansas City, 
Mo.; Texas cities; New York, N. Y. 

LANDS OPENED FOB IBBIGATION. 

Dates of public notices: December 17, 1907; November 30, 1908; June 2, Novem- 
ber 17, 1909; October 7, 1910; March 13, 1911; February 17, 1912; March 2, April 10, 
1915; February 24, September 2, 1916; March 9, 1917; March 12, 1918; March 11, June 
24 1919. 

Location of lands opened: Ts. 21, 22, 23, and 24 S., Rs. 26, 27, 28, and 29 E., New 
Mexico meridian. 

Duty of water: 2.43 acre-feet per acre per annum at the farm, 1918. 

Building charge per acre of irrigable land: $31, $45, $55, $60, and $69. 

Annual operation and maintenance charges on graduated scale according to use. 
For 1919, first acre-foot, $1.40: second acre-foot, 20 cents; third acre-foot, 25 cents; 
fourth acre-foot, 50 cents; additional acre-feet, 75 cents per acre-foot. Waste water 
furnished from January 1 to March 10, 1919, at 15 cents per acre-foot. 

CHBONOLOOICAL ST7MMABY. 

Reconnoissance made and preliminary surveys begun in 1904. 
Construction recommended by board of engineers August 31, 1905. 
Construction authorized by Secretary February 24, 1906. 
Canal sjrstem of Pecos Irrigation Co. purchased February, 1906. 
First irrigation by Reclamation Service, season 1907. 
Construction completed at Avalen diversion, 1912. 
Project 97 per cent completed June 30, 1919. 

IBBIQATION PLAN. 

The irrigation plan of the Carlsbad project provides for the storage of water in Lake 
McMillan, on Pecos River, near Lakewood, N. Mex., and in a storage and distributing 
reservoir on the same river near Carlsbad, N. Mex., controlled by Avalon Dam; and 
the diversion of water from Avalon Reservoir into a canal system, watering lands on 
both sides of Pecos River, in the vicinity of Carlsbad. The United States claims all 
waste, seepage, unappropriated spring, and percolating water arising within the proj* 
ect and proposes to use such water in connection therewith. 

r.i 251 



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252 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL BEPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

The major construction features of the project were completed in 1912, the prin- 
cipal of which are: The Avalon Dam, which nas a concrete core wall; McMllan, an 
earth and rock fill dam, which was built by private capital, antedatinej Grovemment 
control; a concrete flume spanning the Pecos River, with 4 arches of 100 faet each; a 
reinforced concrete siphon, under Dark Canyon, 6 feet in diameter, original^ 400 feet 
long, which was lengthened to 600 feet in 1916; about 50 miles of canals and laterals 
(exclusive of sublaterals and ditches); a concrete head-gate structur&^t each of the 
dams, and two spillway tunnels driven through rock, each 21 feet in- diameter, lined 
with concrete, aggregating 200 feet in length, equipped with heavy cylindrical gates 
operated by turbines (replacing concrete spillway equipped with wooden emiergency 
gates, spillway having been closed with concrete); and a reinforced concrete circular 
spillway 393 feet long. All check gates, spillways, and head-gate stmctores on the 
canals and all turnouts on the laterals are of concrete construction. 

STJMICABY OF OENBBAL DATA FOB CABLSBAD PBOJECT TO ENI> 
OF FISCAL YEAB 1919. 

Areas: 

Irrieable acreage when project is complete 24, 991 

Public land entered to June 30, 1919 166 

Private land June 30. 1919 24,825 

Acreage service could have supplied in season of 1918 24, 990. 6 

Estimated acreage service can supply in season of 1919 24, 990. 6 

Estimated acre£^ service can supply in season of 1920 24, 990. 6 

Acreage irrigated season of 1918 19,460 

Acreage cropped under irrigation season of 1918 18, 200 

Crops: 

Value of irrigated crops, season of 1918 $1, 105, 515. 00 

Value of irrigated crops, per acre cropped $60. 74 

Finances: 

Net construction cost to June 30, 1919 $1, 369,838. 88 

Per cent completed on June 30, 1919 97 

Appropriated for fiscal year 1920 $81, 000. 00 

Estmiated per cent complete by June 30, 1920 97 

Proposed appropriation tor fiscal year 1921 $108, 000. 00 

Estimated per cent complete by June 30, 1921 97 

Announced construction charges per acre $31, $45, $55, $60, $69 

Appropriation fiscal year 1919. $75, 000. 00 

Increase miscellaneous collections and transfers 17, 846. 02 

Increased compensation 3, 462. 08 

$96, 308. 10 

Expenditures chargeable to 1919 appropriation; ====== 

Disbursements $47, 030. 92 

Current liabilities 5, 337. 58 

Contingent liabilities 25. 00 

$52, 393. 50 

Unencumbered balance on July 1, 1919 $43, 914. 60 

Repayments: 

Value of construction wi^ter-right contracts $1, 339, 290. 00 

Construction charges — 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 $221, 963. 30 

Collected to June 30, 1919 $207, 956. 79 

Uncollected on June 30. 1919 $14, 006. 51 

Operation and maintenance charges (public notice): 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 *$240, 308. 89 

Collected to June 30, 1919 $227, 609. 98 

Uncollected on June 30. 1919 $12, 698. 91 

1 Accruals per balance sheet. 1239,639.89; accruals for operation and maintenance supplemental con- 
stractlon charges, 1669: total, ^0,308.89. 



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ISTRW MEXICO, OABLSBAD PBOJEOT. 253 

Repayn K^ W y Continued . 
Water Mtttal charges— 

Acemed to June 30, 1919 $14,483.23 

Collected to June 30, 1919 $14, 424. 28 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 $58.96 

t- '■ ■ I . ■ I . * 
Drainage: 

Estimated acreage damaged by seepage to June 30, 1919 5, 000 

Miles of drains built to June 30, 1919 — 

Open 1L14 

Closed 3.65 

14.79 

Estimated acreage protected by drains to June 30, 1919 5, 500 

Estimated acreage to be protected bv authorized system 5, 500 

Cost of drainage works to June 30, 1919 $132, 727. 83 

CONSTKTTCnON DTTBIVO FISCAL YEAB. 

Construction work was confined to the completion of open drain 
D, which is located in the Loving area; 1,675 linear feet of this drain 
were constructed during the fiscalyear. The lower 2 feet of the total 
depth was in a Wghly cemented gypsum clay, which had to be broken 
with powder. Tne cost of excavation was 18.4 cents per cubic yard 
for the completed ditch. All work was stopped on July 19, 1918, 
due to shortage of the construction funds. 

Lateral system, — ^A few necessary farm turnouts and lateral exten- 
sions built during the fiscal year were charged to operation and 
maintenance. 

SBEPAGB AND DBAINAOE. 

Seepage conditions continued to improve until the latter part of 
the fiscal year. In two areas, one inmiediately south of the town of 
Loving, containing about 2 sections of land, and another between 
the main canal and the lower part of Cass Draw, containing about 
3i sections, about 4 miles south of Otis, the water table was appre- 
ciably rising. Considerable land in both of these areas has been out 
of cultivation most of the time for several years, due to the imcer- 
taintv of profitable production. Adequate drainage should be pro- 
vided for tnese areas at an early date. A small area containing about 
120 acres about 3 miles east of Loving, which is tributary to D drain, 
should also be more adequately protected. Areas tributary to con- 
structed drains which were seeped badly two years ago are now pro- 
ducing maximum crops for the most part. 

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE. 

Storage in the reservoirs was entirely vs'^d at the beginning of the 
fiscal year. Late spring frosts in 1918 killed all fruit, and annual 
crops were not well started until near the 1st of June. The season 
was unusually dry over the entire watershed of the Pecos River; the 
precipitation for the season of 1918 amoimted to 7.86 inches, which 
assisted but little in the maturing of crops. The water supply was 
not sufficient to mature maximimi crops of alfalfa for the second 
and third cuttings in 1918, although a good seed crop was raised 
when the second crop was left for that purpose. Upon the whole, 
the season may be considered more nearly normal than the preceding 
one. The annual run-off of the Pecos for 1918 was 180,850 acre-feet, 
most of which occurred late in the season. 



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254 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

Maintenance work consisted of the usual cleaning and repair work 
durinff the winter and early spring of 1918-19. Severe sprmg winds 
caused about $15,000 of damage on the east embankment at Lake 
McMillan. The riprap on that embankment was badly dama^d 
and maintenance worK was in progress at that point at the end of 
the fiscal year, with the job about 35 per cent completed. 

Historical review j Carlsbad project. 



Item. 



1913 



Acreage (or which service was prepared to 

supply water 20, 261 

Acreage irrigated 14, 260 

Miles of canal operated 45 

Water diverted (acre-feet) 86,660 

Water delivered to land (acre-feet) 33, 044 

Per acre of land i rrigated (acre-feet) 2. 32 



1914 



I 



1915 



20,261 I 
12,690 I 

45 
87,900 I 
30,900, 
2.44 t 



24,796 
13,470 
45 
79,530 
28,857 
2.14 



1916 


1917 


1918 


24,775 


24,775 


24,990.6 
19,460 


16,600 


16,882 


45 


, ^ 


45 


105,470 


fe,196 


98,920 


40,382 
^43 


39,589 


47,380 


2.33 


2.43 



NoTB.— All of the above data as of Dec. 31, each year. 

SBTTLEMENT. 

A considerable percentage of new land has been added to the 
irrigable area. This land is being improved largely by local people, 
in part by farmers who are increasing their holdings and in part by 
local business men, who are purchasing farms and making permanent 
improvements. Very few new settlers from other communities have 
bought lands, although one large ranch was bought recently by a 
farmer from a small settlement near Lake Arthur, 60 miles north. 

Settlement data, Carlsbad project. 



Item. 



Total number of farms on project.. 

Population 

Number of irrigated farms 

Operated by owners or managers 

Operate 1 bV tenants 

Popu lation 

Number of towns 

Population 

Total population in towns and on 

farms 

Numljer of public schools 

Number of churches , 

Number of banks , 

Total capital stock 

Amount of deposits 

Number of depositors 



1913 



»525 
910 
362 
224 
1.38 
910 
4 
3,000 

3,910 

8 

2 

180,000 



1914 



1503 
541 
390 
193 
110 
541 
4 
3,000 

3,541 

8 

2 

180,000 

$547,000 

1,400 



1915 



»524 
912 
325 
149 
176 
912 
4 
3,000 

3,912 

8 

2 

180,000 

$687,000 

1,484 



1916 



1917 



1595 

634 

455 

M67 

83 

634 

4 

3,300 

3,934 

7 

8 

3 

$225,000 

$1,243,316 

2,138 



1627 

992 

535 

M90 

243 

992 

4 

3,300 

4,292 

7 

8 

3 

$275,000 

$1,271,266 

1,941 



1918 



1660 

1,257 

458 

231 

227 

1,257 

3,375 

4,032 

7 

8 

3 

«$275,t)00 

» $1,238, 4.32 

»2,234 



All the above data as of Dec. 31, each year. 

1 Water-ripht applications. 

s Many farms were operated by 1 man. 

»Asol June 30, 1919. 

PBINCIPAL CROPS. 

The principal crops are alfalfa and cotton. Crop results for the 
season of 1918 were very satisfactory on the whole and may be foimd 
in the appended table. Although an inadequate water supply at a 
critical period affected alfalfa hav production, an extra long season 
made up in a large measure the shortage of water for cotton, so that 
the yield of that crop was about the average of past years. The 



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NEW MEXICO, CARLSBAD PROJECT. 



255 



business of dairying on the project is relatively unimportant; in fact, 
has shown some decrease ov6r past years. 

The June, 1919, crop acreage report shows a gain in acreage over 
1918 of about 2,000 acres. The increase was largely in that of 
cotton, which shows a gain of about 28 per cent. The alfalfa acreage 
was about the same as in 1918. 

Crop conditions in 1919 were imusually good. The dry electric 
winds usual in the spring were largelv lacking, and there was more 
humidity than usual. A March rise dfown the river was followed by 
a largely increased stream flow, which was constant imtil the end 
of June. Tne irrigation water was of better quality than usual. The 
unit yield of alfalfa hay was much larger than the average, although 
the average quaUty was not quite so good, due to heavy dews bleacn- 
ing the haj' during the process of curing. The cotton crop was 
further advanced than usual and in fine condition at the end of 
Jime. Work on the farms was somewhat delayed on account of the 
shortage of labor. 

Crop report, Carlsbad project, New Mexico, 1918. 



Crop. 



Alfelfahay 

Alfalfa seed, 

Barley 

Beans 

Cane , 

Corn, fodder 

Com, Indian 

Com, sorghum 

Cotton 

Cottonseed 

Garden 

nay and straw 

Oats 

Pasture , 

Potatoes, sweet 

Wheat 

Miscellaneous 

Less duplicated areas 

Total cropped acreage. 



Acreage irrigated without 
crop. 

Total irrigated acreage , 



Area 

(acres). 



6,435 

2,754 

235 

36 

528 

300 

SOS 

392 

7,147 

7,147 

25 

1,730 

91 

3,689 

10 

1,345 

141 

14,313 



18,200 



1,260 



19,4CO 



Unit of 
yield. 



Tons 

Pounds.. 
Bushels.. 

..do 

Tons 

..do 

Bushels.. 

..do 

Pounds. . 
Tons 



Tons , 

Bushels.. 

Acres 

Pounds. . . 
Bushels.. 



Yields. 



Total. 



Values. 



Average Per unit 
per acre, i of yield. 



12, 

456, 
1, 



1,808, 



865 
1,236 



62,400 
12,171 



1.97. 
166 
7.9 
4 

1.58 
.89 
14 

23.8 
253 
.223 



.6 
13.6 



$24.47 

.134 

1.13 

4.78 

16.45 

12. as 

1.76 
2.08 
.272 
61.00 



Total. 



8.00 
.80 



6,240 
9 



.05 
1.95 



Total and average. 



$310,474 
61, 181 

2,655 

688 

13,750 

3,235 

12,517 

19,430 

491,987 

96,990 

1,350 

6,920 

1,098 
54,114 

3,120 
23,601 

2,315 



1,105,515 



Per acre. 



$48.^ 
22.21 
11.30 
19.11 
26.06 
10.78 
24.64 
49.67 
68.84 
13.66 
52.93 
4.00 
12.06 
14.66 

312.00 
17.61 
16.46 



60.74 



Areas. 



Acres. 



Irrigable area farms reported 24, 775 

Irrifated area farms reported 19, 460 

Unaer water-right applitutions 19, 460 

Cropped area farms reported 18,200 



Farms. 



Per cent 
of project. 



458 

458 
458 
458 



100 

78 
78 



PUBLIC NOTICBS AND OBDEBS. 
PUBLIC NOTICE, MARCH 11, 1919. 

1. Annual operation and maintenance charges. — In pursuance of 
section 4 of the reclamation act of June 17, 1902 (32 Stat., 388), and 
of acts amendatory thereof or supplementary thereto, particularly 
the reclamation extension act of August 13, 1914 (38 Stat., 686), 
announcement is hereby made that the annual operation and mainte- 
nance charge for the irrigation season of 1919 and thereafter until 



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256 EIGHTBENTH ANNUAL B&TOfiT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

further notice against all lands of the Carlsbad project, New Mexico, 
under public notice, shall be a minimum charge of $1.40 per irrigable 
acre, whether water is used thereon or not, which charge will per- 
mit the delivery of not to exceed 1 acre-foot of water per irrigable 
acre; for thlB first acre-foot per irrigable acre additional the charge 
shall be 20 cents per acre-foot; for 9ie second acre-foot per irrigable 
acre additional, 25 cents; for the third acre-foot per irrigable acre 
additional, 50 cents* and for further quantities, 75 cents per acre- 
foot. An additional charge of 15 cents an acre-foot will oe made 
for water used in the winter season beginning at the close of the 
irrigation season and ending Mardi 10, which water would other- 
wise waste over the spillways at Lake Avjalon. All operation and 
maintenance charges will be due and payable on March 1 of each 
year for the preceding irrigation season. 

S. G. Hopkins, 
Assistant Secretary of the Interior, 

public notice, JUNE 24, 1919. 

1. Lands for which water will be fiurnished. — Upon proper appli- 
cation being made therefor, water will be furnished unaer the (Jarls- 
bad project. New Mexico, in the irriffation season of 1919 and there- 
after for the irrigable lands of the third unit of said project, shown 
on farm unit plats of the following townships of the New Mexico 
principal meridian, to wit, T. 22 S., R. 27 E.; T. 23 S., R. 27 E.; 
T. 22 S., R. 28 E.; T. 23 S., R. 28 E.; T. 24 S., R. 28 E.; which 
plats were approved by the department on the date of this notice, 
and are on nle in the oflBce of the project manager. United States 
Reclamation Service, Carlsbad, N. Mex., and the local land oflSice at 
Roswell, N. Mex. 

2. Limit of area for which water right may be secured. — The limit 
of area per entry representing the acreage which, in the opinion of 
the Secretary of the Interior, may be reasonably required for the 
support of a family upon such lands, is fixed at the amount shown 
upon the plats for the several farm units. The maximum limit of 
area for which water-right application may be made for lands in 

f)rivate ownership shaU be 40 acres of urigable land for each 
andowner. 

3. Application for water right. — All water-right applications must 
be made to the project manager, United States Reclamation Service, 
Carlsbad, N. Mex., upon forms provided for that purpose, and may 
be made on and after the date of this notice. 

4. Classes of charges for water rights. — The water-ri^t charges 
are of two kinds, to wit: (1) A charge against each irrigable acre 
to cover cost of construction of the u*rigation system, termed the 
construction charge; and (2) an annual charge against each irrigable 
acre to cover cost of operation and maintenance of the system, 
termed the operation and maintenance diarge. 

5. Construction charge. — The construction charge shall be $69 per 
acre of irrigable land, payable as follows: (a) For lands that were 
prior to August 13, 1914, subjected by contract or otherwise to the 
provisions of the reclamation law, said construction charge shall be 
paid in 10 equal annual installments, the first of which shall be paid 
at the time of filing water-right application, and subsequent install- 



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NEW MEXICO, CARLSBAD PROJECT. 257 

ments shall be due and payable December 1 of each year thereafter; 
provided, however, that if water-right application subject to the pro- 
visions of the reclamation extension act, or an acceptance of the 
provisions of said act, be filed within six months from the date of 
this notice, said construction charge shall be payable in 20 install- 
ments, the first of which shall become due and payable on Decem- 
ber 1, 1919, and subseauent installments on December 1 of each 
year thereafter; in which event the first 4 installments shall each 
be 2 per cent, the next 2 installments each 4 per cent, and the next 
14 each 6 per cent of the total construction charge. 

(6) For the remaining lands an initial payment of 5 per cent of 
the construction charge shall be made at the time of filing water- 
right application, and the remainder of the construction charge shall 
be paia m 15 annual installments, the first 5 of which shall each be 
5 per cent and the remainder each 7 per cent of the total construc- 
tion charge. The first of said 15 annual installments shall become 
due and payable December 1 of the fifth calendar year after the 
initial installment, and subsequent installments shall become due and 
payable on December 1 of each calendar year thereafter. 

6. Increased construction charge in certain cases. — In all cases 
where water-right application for lands in private ownership or for 
lands under entries not subject to the reclamation law shall not be 
made within one year from the date of this notice, the construction 
charge for such land shall be increased 5 per cent each year until 
such application is made and an initial installment is paid. 

7. Advance payment of construction cliar^e permissible. — ^Any 
water-right applicant may, at his option, pay in advance the whole 
or any part of the construction charge owm^ by him within any 
shorter period than that prescribed by this notice. 

8. Operation and maintenance cliarge. — The operation and main- 
tenance charge shall be the same as for other like lands of the project. 
Such charge will be payable on March 1 of each year for tne pre- 
ceding irrigation season. 

9. Place and manner of payment of water charges. — ^All water- 
right charges must be paid at the oflice of the United States Recla- 
mation Service at Carlsbad, N. Mex., in cash or by New York draft 
or money order payable to the specM fiscal agent. United States 
Reclamation Service. 

John W. Hallowell, 
Assistant to the Secretary of the Interior. 

FINANCIAL STATBHBNT. 

Condensed balance sheet, Carlsbad project, June 30, 1919, 

Cash $45.36 

Inventory of materlab and supplies <m hand 14,092.35 

Coirent accounts reoelvable '. 128,485.82 

Constructlan water-right charges nnaccnied 1| 1 15, 557. 70 

■ 1, 145, 143. 52 

Oross ooDstmction cost 1,383,457.78 

Less construction revenue earnings 13,618.90 

Net construction cost 1,359,838.88 

Undelivered orders 25.00 

Oross operation and maintenance cost 285,845.47 

Less operation and maintenance revenue earnings 15, 1 10. 96 

270,734.51 

138554—19 17 



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258 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RBCLAMATJOI? SERVICE. 

AoGOODts payable $5, 683. 74 

Continent obMgations 70. 25 

GoUectionsand contracts of specific amounts for repayments to reclamation fund 1, 588, 810. 34 

MiBoelkuieous accruals 1, 437. 84 

Capital investment: 

Disbursement, transfer, and Joint construction vouchers received $1 , 720, 306. 28 

Collection, transfer, refund, and joint construction vouchers issued 515, 728. 93 

Net investment , 1,204,577.34 

Feature costs of Carlsbad project. 



Principal feature. 



Examination and surveys: Preliminary surveys, etc. 

8tora(^ svstems: 

McMillan Reservoir- 
Preliminary surveys, etc 

Rights of way and lands for flowage , 

Dam, spillways, outlet works, beadworks 

Avalon reservoir— Dam, spillways, outlet works.. 

Third reservoir— Preliminary surveys, etc , 



Fiscal year Total to June 
1919. i 30, 1919. 



Total, storage system. 



Canal svstem: 

Main Canal (concrete lined, 11.67 miles). 

East Canal 

Black River cut-off canal 

Black River canal 

Flumes , 

Dark Canyon siphon 

Wasteways, etc 



Total, canal system. 



Lateral system: 

Laterals, excavation 

Laterals, concrete lining. . . . 
Minor structures, concrete.. 
Minor structures, timber. . . 
Flume, near Avalon Dam.. 
Siphon, near Avalon Dam . 



Total, lateral system . 



Drainage system: 

Preliminary surveys, etc. 

Open drains 

Closed drains 



Total, drainage system. 



Permanent improvements: 

Real estate (P. I. & I. Co. plant). 
Buildings 



Total permanent improvements. 



Operation and maintenance charges transferred to and compounded with 
construction charges 



Gross construction cost to June 30, 1919.. 



Less revenue during construction period: 

Rentals of buildings 

Rentals of grazing and farming lands. , 

Rentals of irrigation water 

Contractors' freight refunds , 

Other revenues, imclassifled , 

IxBS on hospital operations , 



IS $440.00 



M40.00 I 



37.36 
'i33.'72 



m.08 



68.05 
2,187.71 



2,255.76 



1,986.84 



5.00 
2,851.62 



11.72 

85.00 
» 478. 10 



Total revenues 

Net construction cost to June 30, 1919. 



1,975.24 



11.60 



$41, 061. 56; 



6,718.6* 
105, 760. 0» 
228,088.91 
315,989.46 

3,146.33 



659,712.41 



187,828.96 
9,436.95 
17,229.17 
25,506.48. 
. 21,354.99 
31,333.47 
29,621.29^ 



322,401.31 



32,650.7 
3,171.6» 

26,885.47 

1,457.4» 

912.49 

5,373.37 



70,351.17 



4,027.66 
83,885.71 
44,814.50 



132,727.83: 



152,057.31 
3,192.1» 



156, 248.6a 



1,984.00 



1,383,457.78 



800.70 
2,36L62 
8,163.86 

209.06 
2.692.34 
^596. 1& 



13,618.9a 



1,360,838.88 



« Deduct. 

s ActuiU cost for yearfcredit $440 for left-over constructkkn material transferred to operate and matn^ 
nance work. 



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NEW MEXICO, CABLSBAD PROJECT. 
Statement of cost by calendar years y Carlsbad project. 



259 





Construction. 


Operation and 

maintenance 

under public 

notice. 


Total cost. 


Year ending Dec. 31— 

1902-1905 :.. 


t24,713.44 

326,675.00 

102,604.28 

48,225.11 

16,397.25 

I « 3, 067. 28 

230.30 

216,120.72 

39,589.28 

72,434.77 

89,152.49 

10?, 397. 86 

144,081.91 

114,409.62 

IM25.05 




124,713.44 
326,675.09 


1906 




1907 




192,504.28 
86,01660 


1908 


•37,791.58 
41,963.27 
29,M9.46 
57,398.86 
1*76,279.06 
23,387.88 
18,771.86 
26,686.92 
25,549.51 
29,239.58 
40,386.47 
29,604.46 


1000 


58,360.67 
25,982.18 
57,638.16 


1910 


1911 


1912 


130,850.66 


1913 % 


62,977.16 
91,206.63 
115,P39.41 
127,947.36 
173,321.49 
154,796.00 
29,260.41 


1014 


1915 


1016 


1017 


1018 


Jan. 1 to June 30, 1010 






Qro8s constmction cost June 80, 1010 


1,383,457.78 


283,^10.79 
2,204.68 


1,667,098.67 
2,204.68 


Plant account, June 30, 1010 








Total 


1,383,457.78 


285,845.47 


1,660,303.25 







» Beduct. 

> Actual coftt for year, $823.15. Credits explained as follows: Operation and maintenance, 12.790.05, for 
Pecember, 1009, posted in error to conatruction cost ledger; correction made January, 1910. Cost of project 
exprimental farm. $1^090.48, transferred to operation and maintenance cart ledger, January, 1910. 

• Actual cost, $164,970.52. Actual credit of $181,258.58 represents cost of construction work charged to 
operation and malntonanoe, and transferred to construction cost ledger after issuance of public notice of 
February 17, 1912. 

« Actual cost for first half year, $50.75. Credits explained: Drain ditch damages to crops, $35.80; left-over 
construction material transferred to operation and maintenance work, $440. 

Note.— Plant account balance, formerly carried under "Construction," transferred to operation and 
maintenance during year. 

Statement of cost, by fiscal years, Carlsbad project. 



I 



Construction. 



Year ending June 30— I 

1002-1006 ! » $9,000.00 

1006 » 241,000.00 

1007 224,847.63 

1008 108,888.41 

1000 1 16,067.01 

1010 1 11,446.67 

1011 048.67 

1012 201,108.67 

1013 20,810.27 

1014 w 67,004.40 

1015 1 80,863.26 

1016 81,638.07 

1017 172,155.82 

1018 1 144,113.27 

1910 1 1,086.84 

Gross oonstruetion cost, June 80, 1010 1,383,467.78 

Plant aoooonts, June 80, 1010 

Total 1,883,467.78 



Operation and 

maintenance 

under pnbHc 

notice. 



Totalco«l. 



$0,466.24 
56,613.44 
32,676.34 
28,310.97 
1 40,756.00 I 
26,760.31 
23,662.81 
23,734.67 
22,283.26 
26,200.68 
36,027.67 
40,682.61 



283,640.70 I 
2,204.68 I 



$6,000.0* 
241,000.00 
224,347.63 
118,343.66 
70,670.46 
44,022.01 
20,250.64 
161,441.77 
66,570.68 
80,797.30 
113,607.83 
103,822.22 
108,446.49 
170,140.04 
51,600.86 



1,667,008.67 
2,204.68 



286,846.47 1,660,80$.26 



1 Estimated. 

* Deduct: Actual oost, $181,601.68. Actual credit, $181,268.68, represents oonstruetion cost charged to 
operatUm and maintenance and transferred to construction cost ledger after issuance of pnbHc nouee of 
Feb. 17, 1012. 

NoTK.— Plant account balance, formerly carried under '^Constniotion," transferred t» operation and 
maintenance during year. 



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260 EIGHTEENTH AKNTJAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 



Estimated cost of contemplated tuorhf Carlsbad project, during fiscal year 1920. 



Principal features. 



Operation and maintenance under public notice. 
Reimbursable accounts 



Total. 



Estimated 
cost. 



$46,000 
1,000 



47,000 





to Dec. SI 


, 1918. 






Calendar year 1918. 


To end of calendar year 1918. 




Operation 


Mainte- 


Total. 


Operation. 
$10,937.76 


Mainte- 
nance. 


Total. 


COSTS. 

Storaee works: 

ffcMUlan Reservoir- 
Dam, east and west em- 
bankments, spillways, and 
beadwOTks 


$2,455.12 


$98.33 
3,858.30 

178.70 


$2,553.45 
3,858.80 

1,498.18 


$125.99 
8,858.30 

843.42 


$11,063.75 
3,858.80 

5,4U.49 


Right of way and lands 


Avia<m Reservoir— Dam, spill- 

VTAVR And hMkdwnrlrR 


1,319.48 


4,568.07 






3,774.60 


4,135.33 


7,909.93 


15,505.83 


4,827.71 


20,833.54 


Canalandlateralsystem: Maln^Bast, 
Black River cut-off, and Black 
River canals and structures: 
flumes; Dark Canyon siphon, and 
(dl Iftterftls and atnictures 


6,212.18 


11,478.94 


17,601.07 


65,607.28 


137,572.18 


208,179.41 




Drainage system: 

Onen drains B. C. C-1. D, E, F. . 




1,132.89 
68.55 


1,132.89 
68.55 




2,167.72 
944.80 


2,167.72 
944 80 


ClfMAd drains A.D-1. G 


















1,195.94 


1,195.94 




8,112,52 


3,112.52 








Undistributed expenses: 

IRniidin^ and fencee --,-- 




601.79 


601.79 
4,647.79 


"i'moi* 


7,707.58 

'"454.* 68* 
1,870.81 
9,504.91 


7,707.58 

4,T70.91 

454.58 


Hvdronietrv ,-rr 


4,647.79 


Roads 




Farms . . ...--r-r 










1,870.81 


Oenenil expense. ....-.^. 


4,510.26 


3,829.60 


8,339.95 


4,856.07 


14;450.98 






9,158.05 


4,431.48 


13,589.53 


9,626.98 


19,627.^ 


29,264.86 


Bubtotal, operation, and main- 
tenance . , r 


19,144.78 


21,241.69 


40,386.47 


90,740.04 


166,140.29 


255, 88a 33 
1,934.00 


Leas unpaid operation and mainte- 
nance charges added to construo- 
tion 7 














Total 












208,946.33 




.^.^ 


■ 1 ■! 1 









REVENUES. 

Operation and maintenance cliarges 
accrued on contracts with water- 
right applicants 






54,874.49 
M7.18 






239,684.92 
308.30 


Operation and maintenance charges 
paid in advance by water-right 
applicants. r . . , , 










Operation and maintenance charges 
paid and forfeited by water-ngbt 
applicants 










151.05 


Penalties on operation and mainte- 
nance charges accrued on con- 
tracts with water-right applicants. 

Rentals of land and buildings dur- 






1,550.02 

750.27 
100.47 

209.06 
» 641. 98 






3,948.97 

5,096.96 
6,255.15 

2,813.63 
U,406.80 










Rentals of irrigation water 











Other revenues unclassified, earned 
during operating period 


' 






Len discounts allowed on operation 
and maintenance charges accrued 
on contracts with water-rlg^t ap- 
plicants (contra) w . . . X . s ... 


! 














Total 




56,933.15 






256,854.20 










Difference (excess) 


1 


16,546.68 






2,907.87 




1 







1 Deduct. 



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NEW MEXICO-TEXAS, RIO GRANDE PROJECT. 

L. M. Lawson, project manager, El Paso, Tex. 
LOCATION. 

Oountiee: Socorro, Sierra, Dona Ana, N. Mex.; El Paao, Tex. 

Townships: 8 to 29 S., Rs. 3 E. to 5 W., New Mexico meridian. 

Railroads: Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe, El Paso & Southwestern, Southern 
Pacific, and Texas & Pacific . 

Railroad stations and estimated population, June 30, 1919: Texas — El Paso, 75,000; 
Ysleta, 500: La Tuna, 325: Fabens, 500: Canutillo 275; Clint, 500: Vinton, 25; Belen, 
20. New Mexico— Las Cruces, 4,500; Mesilla Park, 850; Rincon, 400; Dona Ana, 250; 
Engle, 120; Bemio, 50: Fort Selden, 25: Hatch, 200: ffill, 50: Leasburg, 25; Mesquite, 
50: and Vado, 50. 

WATER SUPPLY. 

Source of water supply: Rio Grande. 

Area of drainage l^sin: 37,000 square miles. 

Annual run-on in acre-feet of Rio Grande: At San Marcial (30,000 square miles), 
1895 to 1918, inclusive, maximum, 2,422,000: minimum, 200,700; mean, 1,163,331. 
At El Paso, Tex. (38,600 square miles), 1889 to 1914, inclusive, maximum, 2,010,000; 
minimum, 50,700; mean, 925,400. Data since 1914 at El Paso are not published, as 
most of the surplus water since that date has been stored in Elephant Butte Reser- 
voir. 

AOBI0TJLTT7BAL AND CLIMATIC CONDITIONS. 

Area for which the service is prepared to supply water, season of 1919: 107,000 acres. 

Area under rental contracts, season of 1919: 75,000 acres. 

length of irrigating season: From February 15 to November 15 — 274 days. 

Average elevation of irrigable area: 3,700 feet above sea level. 

Rainfall on irrigable area: 33-year average, 10.51 inches: 1918, 8.21 inches. 

Range of temperature on irrigable area: —5° to 105° F. 

Character of soil of irrigable area: Fertile alluvium and sandy loam. 

Principal products: ARalfa, corn, wheat, melons, fruit, and v^etables. 

Principal markets: Towns in Texas, New Mexico, and Louisiana, and eastern cities. 

LANDS OPENBD FOB IBBIOATION. 

No lands have been opened for irrigation by public notice. 

All lands in the Rincon, Mesilla, and El raso Valle>^ are being irrigated under 
rental contracts. 

CHBONOLOOICAL STJMMABY. 

Reconnoissance and preliminary surveys begun in March, 1903. 

Construction of Leasnurg unit authorized December 2, 1905. 

Reclamation act extended to Texas June 12, 1906 (34 Stat., 259^ 

Treaty with Mexico providing for distribution of waters of the Rio Grande pro- 
claimed January 16. 1907. 

Construction of Elephant Butte Dam authorized by Congress and $1,COO,000 appro- 
priated March 4, 1907 (34 Stat.. 1357). 

Leasburg unit completed July, 1908. 

First irrigation bv Reclamation Service (Leasburg unit), season of 1908. 

Construction of filephant Butte Dam authorized by Secretary May 23, 1910. 

Construction plans of Elephant Butte Dam approved by board of engineers June 
6, 1910, January 22, 1911, August 12, 1912, January 30, 1913. 

Construction plans approved by Secretary October 26, 1910. 

Franklin Canal purchased October, 1912. 

26 ] 



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262 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

First 11 miles of Franklin Canal reconstructed March, 1914: second section (8 miles 
reconstructed 1915. 

East Side Canal completed Septembei, 1915. 

West Side Canal completed November, 1915. 

San Elizario feed canal completed April, 1916. 

Elephant Butte Dam completed May 13, 1916. 

Mesilla diversion dam completed May 31, 1916. 

Leasburg extension canal and Picacho branch canal to station 121 completed May 
^^, 1916. 

Percha Dam completed January, 1918. 

Arrey Canal completed January, 1918. 

Garfield flume completed February, 1911 . 

Garfield ('anal construction be^un June, 1917. 

Hatch siphon construction begun January, 1918. 

Hatch Canal constiuction begun February, 1918. * 

San Miguel Canal cons^.iuction begun October, 1917. 

Me^illa Valley, Nemexas drain begun August, 1917. 

Mesilla Vallev, wes- drain bearun August, 1917. 

Montoya he.%dga e completed June, 1918. 

Montova Canal construction begun March, 1918. 

Jua,n d'Herrera lateral district completed May, 1918. 

San Elizario headgate completed May, 1918. 

San Elizario main canal construction begun January, 1918. 

El Paso Valley River and middle drains construction begun July, 1917. 

Rincon Siphon begun August, 1918. 

Hatch Sipnon completed October, 1918. 

Construction Rincon main canal begun October, 1918. 

Hatch Canal completed March, 1919. 

Community canals, Mesilla Valley, deeded to the service for reconstruction and 
operation, December, 1918. 

Rincon siphon completed March, 1919. 

Feeder canal for San Elizario Island completed M^rch, 1919. 

Project, exclusive of Elepliant Butte Dam, 53 per cent completed June 30, 1919. 

Project, including Elephant Butte Dam, 70.7 per cent completed June 30, 1919. 

IRBIOATION PLAN. 

The irrigation plan of the Rio Grande project provides for the storage of flood waters 
of the Rio Granae in a reservoir controlled bv Elephant Butte Dam, about 12 miles 
west of Engle, N. Mex., and the diversion ol water from the Rio Grande, about 24 
miles below for watering lands in Rincon Valley; abo'ut 60 miles below for the irri- 
gation of 35,000 acres in the upper Meeilla Valley under the Leasbvu^ diversion dam; 
about 80 miles below for the irrigation of 47,000 acres in the lower Mesilla Valley under 
the Mesilla Dam; and about 120 miles below for supplying water to lands in El Paso 
Valley and furnishing 60,000 acre-feet per annum for use on land in El Paso Valley 
on the Mexican side of the Rio Grande. The United States claims all waste, seepage, 
spring, and percolating water arising within the project and proposes to use such water 
in connection therewith. All irrigation works req^uired for Las Palomas and Rincon 
Valleys will be new; those for the Mesilla Valley include a diversion and 10.8 miles 
of canal now constructed, as well as a diversion dam 5i miles southwest of Las Cruces 
and 27 miles of canal leading therefrom which have also been constructed; and those 
required for El Paso Valley will supplement and improve present canal systems. 

The features of the above irrigation plan that have been completed are the Elephant 
Butte Dam, the Percha diversion dam, the Arrey Canal, the Garfield flume, the'Gar- 
field main canal, the Hatch siphon. Hatch main canal, the Rincon siphon, the Leas- 
burg diversion dam and Leasburg main canal, extension of the Mesilla diversion dam 
and east and west side canals in the lower Mesilla Valley, the Monto^^a temporary 
intake works and main canal in the lower east side of the Mesilla Valley (but in the 
Texas irrigation district) the reconstruction of practically all the Franklin Canal, the 
construction of the San Elizario main canal headworks. the reconstruction of the main 
canal, and the construction of the San Elizario Island feeder canal and flume across 
the Rio Giande in the El Paso Valley. The construction of 10 main drains is also 
under way. 



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NEW MEXICO-TEXAS, RIO GRANDE PROJECT. 263 

SUMMABY OF GENERAL DATA FOB BIO OBANDE PBOJECT TO END 
OF FISCAL YEAB 1919. 

Areas: 

Irrigable at reage when project is complete 162, 000 

Public land entered to June 30, 1919 553 

Public land withdrawn on June 30, 1919 4, 890 

State land, unsold, June 30, 1919 2,602 

Railroad land, June 30, 1919 360 

Private land, June 30, 1919 153,595 

Acreage service could have supplied in season of 1918 92, 300 

Estimated acreage service can supply in season 1919 107, 000 

Estimated acreage service can supply in season 1920 110, 000 

Acreage irrigated, season of 1918 .* 64, 781 

Ac reage cropped under irrigation season of 1918 64, 002 

Crops: 

Value of irrigated crops, season of 1918 $4, 237, 020. 00 

Value of irrigated crops per acre cropped $66. 20 

Finances: 

Net construction cost to June 30, 1919 $9, 100, 667. 89 

Per cent completed on June 30, 1919 , 70.7 

Appropriated for fiscal year 1920 $1,250,000.00 

Estunated per cent complete by June 30, 1920 79. 4 

Proposed appropriation lor fiscal year 1921 $1, 000, 000. 00 

Estimated per cent complete by June 30, 1921. 87. 5 

Unexpended balance 1918 appropriation $145, 174. 05 

Increased compensation 65, 622. 90 

Appropriation fiscal year 1919 1,296,000.00 

Increaee, miscellaneous collections 206, 177. 54 



Expenditures chargeable to 1919 appropriation: 
Disbursements — 

Reclamation fund 1,205,444.44 

Increased compensation 65, 622. 90 

Transfers. 116, 848. 46 

Current liabilities, 1919 158, 972. 85 

Contingent liabilities, 1919 28, 891. 00 



$1,712,974.49 



1, 575, 779. 65 

Balance on July 1, 1919 137, 194. 84 

Repayments: 

Water-rental charges — 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 644,016. 27 

Collected to June 30, 1919 559, 285. 30 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 84, 730. 97 



Drainage — 

Estimated acreage damaged by seepage to June 30, 1919 80, 700 

Miles of open drains built to June .30, 1919 119. 1 

Estimated acreage protected by drains to June 30, 1919 57, 000 

Estimated acreage to be protected by authorized system 147, 000 

Cost of drainage works to June 30, 1919 $930, 535. 95 

CONSTBTJCTION DTTBING FISCAL YEAB. 

Hatch siphon. — This structure, upon which construction was begun 
in January, 1918, was completed in October, 1918, and placed in 
commission at the beginning of the irrigation season of 1919. 

Hatch Canal. — ^A portion of this reconstruction work, which was 
begun previous to the 1918 irrigation season, was practically com- 
pleted during the 1918-19 winter months, when opportimity for work 
was present with water out of the canals. 



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264 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

Canal and lateral systems. — In December, 1918, the following com- 
munity canals were deeded to the Reclamation Service for recon- 
struction and operation: The Las Cruces, Mesilla, and Dona Ana 
community canals in the Las Cruces district; the La Mesa and Cham- 
berino in the west side of the Mesilla Valley; and the Three Saints 
community canal in the east side of the Mesilla Valley. Over 100 
miles of community ditch were taken over by this transfer, and a large 
amount of reconstruction work accompUshed previous to the begin- 
ning of the 1919 irrigation season. Practically all community canals 
in tne Mesilla Valley have been now deeded to the Reclamation Serv- 
ice, the only exception being the* La Union Irrigation Co. system, 
which irrigates approximately 10,000 acres in the lower west side of 
the Mesilla Valley. It is contemplated that during the coming winter 
season this property will also be transferred to the Government for 
reconstruction and operation. In the El Paso Valley some extensions 
were made to the canal and lateral system during the winter season, 
which included construction by contract work in the Ysla, j sland, ana 
other lateral distiicts, and the completion of the Island feeder canal 
system. 

Drainage construction. — At the end of the fiscal year 119 miles of 
open drain had been constructed on the project, all of which except 
4 miles were built by Government forces. The excavation involved 
by machine was 5,573,700 cubic yards. Ten main drains were being 
excavated at the close of the year. On June 30, 1919, drainage con- 
struction was 36 per cent completed. 

Surveys, — Surveys during the fiscal year included the extension of 
lateral systems in the MesiDa and El Paso Vallevs and investigations, 
accompanied by surveys, for the Tomillo and P^ort Hancock districts 
in the lower end of the project. Extensive drainage surveys have 
been made covering the Rincon Valley, in addition to those required 
for the MesiDa and El Paso Valleys. 

SBBPAOB AND DBAINAGB. 

Investigations of groimd-water conditions in the Kincon, Mesilla, 
and El Paso Valleys were continued and extended during the year. 
The well readings so acquired and taken at regular intervals were 
utiUzed for the location of the large mileage of contemplated drainage 
canals. The serious seepage condition present during the previous 
fiscal year has been relieved to a large extent by the construction of 
drains. The area so protected by drainage ditches on Jime 30, 1919, 
is estimated at 57,000 acres. 

During the fiscal vear additions to the drainage equipment already 
assembled consisted of six drag line excavators, four oi which were ol 
the Bucyrus l^-yard type similar to the four received during the pre- 
vious fiscal year; one Monighan 2-T machine was also received and 
placed on excavation in the Leasburg district. Mechanical defects in 
the new machines, which had prevented the expected output, were 
corrected in all machines during the year. In adoition to the Govern- 
ment equipment, contract with the Jennings Construction Co., of 
El Paso, was made for the excavation of approximately 10 miles of 
drainage canal in the vicinity of Las Cruces, and work was begun on 
this feature in August, 1918. 



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NEW MEXICO-TEXAS, RIO GRANDE PROJECT. 265 

HtBIGATION DISTRICTS. 

Following the formation of the two irrigation districts necessarjr in 
the New Mexico and Texas portions of the project, completed during 
the &cal year 1919, contracts were executed oetween the Secretary 
of the Interior and the district authorities for the completion of 
drainage and lateral work. In the New Mexico portion of the 

Project this contract involves the expenditure of $6,530,000. In the 
'exas portion of the project the expected expenditure under contract 
for drainage and lateral system involves $4,260,000. The property 
owners in the Tornillo district of 4,600 irrigable acres, located Below 
Fabens, Tex., formed an irrigation district under Texas State laws 
during the earlv part of 1919. Contract with the service was being 
negotiated at the end of the fiscal year. 

ECONOMIES OF GOVEBNICENT WOBK. 

On accoimt of the high cost of forage and labor unit prices for 
excavation by contract teamwork averaged during the fiscal year 26 
cents per cubic yard. Further advertising for team excavation 
resulted in higher bids, which were not awarded. The Chamberino 
east lateral, about 6i miles long, involving 64,300 cubic yards of 
earthwork, was then excavated by Government forces, using a 
Bucyrus excavator at a unit cost of 9.2 cents per cubic yard. 

In order to expedite drainage work, advertisements were circu- 
lated for the construction by contract of a section of drain in the 
Mesilla Valley, and bids ranging from 10^ cents to 16 cents were 
obtained. Award was made to the lowest bidder at 10^ cents. To 
date the excavation by Government forces of approximately a 
million and a half cubic yards on similar work has been accomplished 
at a cost of 8.4 cents per cubic yard. 

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE. 

The Reclamation Service delivered water in 1918 on a rental basis 
to 64,781 acres; the larger acreage of this amount was in New Mexico, 
and water was supjplied under contract with the Elephant Butte 
Water Users' Association at the rate of actual cost of operation and 
maintenance plus 10 per cent. In addition a charge of 50 cents was 
made for reservoir service. 

The transfer of community ditch properties in December, 1918, 
was foUowed by the negotiation and acceptance of individual con* 
tracts directly with the service in the New Mexico portion of the 
project. In the El Paso Valley in Texas water was supplied under 
contract with individuals, as in the previous irrigation season. The- 
uniform individual water-rental contract rate was inaugurated 
throughout the project, with charges for water at the rate of 75 cents 
per acre-foot for the first 3 acre-feet, $1 per acre-foot for the fourth 
acre-foot, and $1.25 per acre-foot for any water used in excess of 4 
acre-feet. In addition a charge of 50 cents per acre was made for 
reservoir service. 

The total amount of water diverted throughout the project 
amounted to 348,296 acre-feet, giving a dutv of approximately 5.37 
acre-feet per acre. This amount is measured at the point of delivery 
from canals. The taking over of community ditches in the El Paso- 



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266 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVIC5E. 

Valley reduced the water use and eliminated much waste in irrigation. 
The same result is expected by the transfer of community ditches to 
a centralized control in the Mesilla Valley. 

Individual measurements were carried on as far as possible, and 
beginning with the season of 1919 an extension of the organization 
and facilities for obtaining the correct amount of individual use were 
accomplished. This service includes a monthly statement to irriga- 
tors of the amount of water furnished in acre-feet during the month.* 
► On June 30, 1919, the service was prepared to supply water to 
107,000 acres. 

Historical review ^ Rio Grande project. 



Item. 



Acreage for which service was 
prepared to supply water 

Acreage irrigated 

Miles canal operated 

Water diverted (acre-feet) 

Water diverted to land (acre- 
feet) 

Per acre of land irrigated (acre- 
feet) , 




1915 



40,000 I 45,000 

28,442 33,876 

37 : 37 

> 179,964 i 9 199,952 



5.68 



5.90 




1918 



1919 » 



92,300 107,000 

(M,781 75,000 

153 291 

■613,638 « 385,000 

& 348, 296 225,000 



5.37 



3.0 



» Estimated. 

« Measured at point of delivery from canals. 

» Total diversions , including water wasted and rediverted from river below. 

* Total diversions less water wasted and re-diverted. 

-• Includes delivery to farms by U.S. Reclamation Service operation and to heads of community ditches . 

SBTTIiEMENT. 

The results of drainage work accomplished were of such satis- 
factoiy extent as to give encouragement to settlement, particularly 
in the Mesilla Valley. . A large number of land sales and transfers 
were effected, and although no attempt was made to interest outside 
settlers in the settlement of lands, because of their condition, quite a 
number of newcomers, who had previously been interested in project 
development, made purchases oi tracts where protected by drains. 
A very small area of new land was placed in cultivation, smce con- 
struction results were more in the nature of perfecting the water 
supply for the present area than in the addition of new tracts. 

Considerable activity was present in clearing lands and growing 
crops in the newly formed Tomillo irrigation district, below the town 
of Fabens. No construction work has been possible in this area, but 
water is delivered in the river opposite various community canals for 
its diversion to this territory. 



Settlement data, Rio Grande project. 



Item. 



Total number of farms 

Population 

Number of irrigated farms 

Operated by owner 

Operated by tenants 

Number of towns 

Population 

Total population in towns and on 

farms 

Number of public schools 

Number of churches 

Number of banks 

Amount of capital stock 

Amount of deposits ' 

Number of depositors 



1,536 

6,642 

1,536 

932 

604 

25 

78, 135 

84,777 

47 

81 

14 

12,645,000 

111,6530,00 

40,000 



1915 



1,700 

10,000 

1,700 

1,000 

700 

25 

80,000 

90,000 

52 

85 

18 

$3,000,000 

$19,916,380 

40,000 



1916 



1,638 

10,431 

1,638 

1,145 

493 

25 

86,331 

96,762 
52 
87 
18 

$3,000,000 
$29,2^,455 
40,000 



1917 



1,700 

10,600 

1,700 

1,170 

530 

25 

86,600 

97,100 
52 
90 
18 

$3,000,000 
131,000,000 
40,000 



1918 


1919 


2,287 


2,7(tt 


10,269 


12,890 


2 287 


2,708 


1,377 


1906 


910 


'737 


27 


27 


87,997 


89,316 


98,266 


102,206 


52 


64 


99 


101 


18 


17 


$3,000,000 
132,000^000 


$3,250,000 


$33,000,000 


40,000 


44,000 



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NEW MEXICO-TEXAS, RIO GRAKDK PROJECT. 



267 



PRINCIPAL CROPS. 

The principal crops raised on the project during the year 1918 
were, as in former years, alfalfa, wheat, and com. A slight increase 
In the average yield of alfalfa is noticeable in comparison with the 
yield of 1917. The yield, however, as compared with previous years, 
before seepage conditions were so serious, is still susceptible of in- 
•orease. The first portion of the fiscal year the season was very 
favorable for fruit, especially pears. Tne increase in crop value, 
•due to war demands, resulted m increasing the average yield value 
per acre cropped from $56.50 for 1917 to $66.20. 

Crop report y Rio Grande project y New Mexico- Texas, year of 1918, 



Crop. 



.VMaUa 

Alfalfa seed 

Apples 

Barley 

Beans 

Beets, sugar 

Cane 

Cantaloupes 

-Corn, Indian 

•Com, sorphum » 

Do.« 

Com fodder 

^^otton 

Truck, small 

Oardens 

Hav, miscellaneous: 

Millet seed 

MUo maize 

Oats 

Pasture 

Onions 

Peaches 

Pears 

Peas 

Potatoes, sweet 

Potatoes, white 

Rye 

"Tomatoes 

Wat emelons 

Wheat 

Miscellaneous * . . . . 

Less duplicated areas 

Total cropped acreage, 

Irrirated, no crop: 

Young alfalfa , 

Nonbearing orchards. . . 

Pasture (not reported ) . 

Crops without yield (not 

reported) 



Total irrigated acreage 



Area 

raores). 



64,002 



25 
434 
300 

20 



64,781 



Yields. 



Unit of 
: icld. 



Total. 



1 Average 
, per acre. 



28,867 ! 

83 

95 

428 

2,648 

5 

3,735 

57 

10, 175 

660 

296 

583 

608 

35 

657 

387 

1 

80 

697 

1,932 

99 

476 

10 

177 

7 

85 

204 

85 

11,651 

1,286 

2,108 



Ton 

Bushel. 
Pound . 
Bushel. 
...do.... 

Ton 

..do.... 
Crate... 
Bushel. 

Ton 

Bushel. 

Ton 

Pound. 
..do.... 



-I 



Ton 

Bushel. 

..do 

..do.... 



Bushel.. 
Pound. 
..do.... 
Bushel., 
..do.... 
..do.... 
..do.... 
Pound., 



Bushel... 



79,568 


2.8 


172 


2.1 


238,093 


2,506 


9,910 


23 


23,984 


9.1 


35 


7 


18,062 


4.8 


22,800 


400 


239,915 


24 


4,620 


7 


1,717 


6.8 


1,512 


2.6 


148,000 


243 


90,090 


2,674 



Values. 



Per unit 
of yield. 



1,344 
20 
2,800 
32,720 ^ 



3.5 
20 
35 
47 



35 

214,320 

3,991,115 

100 

17,578 

2,000 

1,360 

1,070,000 



385,369 



35 

3,166 

8,386 

10 

99 

29 

16 

6,346 



33 



$26.94 

12.03 

.02 

2.00 

4.50 

5.00 

15.00 

.60 

1.87 

6.00 

3.34 

12.43 

.25 

.10 



19.77 

1.25 

2.00 

.78 



1.71 

.04 

.03 
6.00 
1.01 

.62 
2.00 

.01126 



2.16 



Total and average. . 



Areas. 



Total irrigable area farms reported. 

Total irrigated farms reported 

Under rental contracts 

Total cropped area farms reported . 



TcUl. 



$2,064,347 

2,070 

5,460 

19,820 

108,521 

175 

270,932 

13,880 

448,747 

27,720 

5,736 

18,790 

37,000 

9,009 

66,842 

26,579 

26 

5,600 

25,596 

27,883 

60 

9,189 

125,340 

600 

17,731 

1,032 

2,720 

12, 135 

3,077 

829,174 

51,440 



4,237,020 



Per acre. 



$71.61 
24.94 
57.37 
46.31 
40.98 
35.00 
72.54 

240.00 
44.10 
42.00 
19.38 
32.23 
60.86 

257.40 

101.74 



25.t» 
70.00 
36.72 
14.43 
60.00 
92.82 
263.32 
60.00 
100.18 
147.60 
32.00 
59.41 
36.20 
71.17 
40.00 



66.30 



Acres. I Farms. 



71,564 
64,781 
64,781 
64,781 



2,287 
2,287 
2,287 
2,287 



1 Seed and cane used. 
• Seed only used. 

Note.— In the above crop list there Is included the following acreage of crops withoat yield: Alfalfa, 
17.6 acres; com, Indian, 22 acres; wheat, 39 acres; beans, 30.25 acres. 



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268 EIGHTEENTH AKNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

FINANCIAL STATBMBNT. 

Condensed balance sheet, Rio Orande project, June SO, 1919. 

C5a8h $17,860.77 

Inventory of materials and supplies 209,722.84 

Acoounts receivable 85,680.43 

Construction work contracted 77,471.8© 

Gross construction cost , 89,775,296.36 

Less construction revenue earnings 674,628.47 

Net construction cost 9, lOQ, 607.89 

Acoounts payable 160,070.40 

Contingent oDligations 94,832.60 

Collections and contracts of speciflc amounts fbr repayments to reclamation fund 36. 00 

Capital investment: 

Disbursement, transfer, and joint oonstmction vouchers received $10,396,711.85 

Collection, transfer, refund, and Joint construction vouchers issued 1 , 100, 7^. 60 

Net investment 9.295,964.75 

Feature costs, Rio Grande project. 



Features. 



Examination and surveys: 

Proieot, generaf 

TTig n-iine fift^ifti 

Silt deposits. Elephant Butte Reservoir 

Hydrographlc survey, New Mexico 

Hydrographic survey, Colorado 

Drainage investigation. San Luis Valley 

San Marcial investigations, New Mexico 

Topoeraphic surveys, Tomillo and Fort Hancock districts. 
Rio Grande hydrometry 



Subtotal. 



Storage S3r8tem, Elephant Butte Reservoir: 

Preliminary and general 

Elephant Butte Dam (see sheet) 

Embankment 

. Spillway 



Subtotal. 



Canal sjrstem: 

Palomas system, preliminary. 

Rinoon system 

Leasburg system 

MesUla system 

El Paso Valley system 



Subtotal. 



Lateral system: 

Leasburg system 

Rincon system 

Mesil la system 

El Paso Valley system . 



Subtotal. 



Drainage svstem: 

Project as a whole, preliminary.. 
Palomas s>'st€m, preliminary. . . 



Rincon system. 

Mesilla valley system- 
Preliminary surveys and testing. 

East drain 

Nemexas drain 

West drain 



Fiscal 3rear 
1919. 



$5,811.24 



194.36 



11,951.04 
1,560.45 



19,507 09 



Total to June 
30, 1919. 



$82,430.40 
37.513.76 
9,430.48 
5,534.43 
15.409.70 
7,286.53 
1,792.34 
14,867.73 
2,847.76 



177,103.13 



42,914.17 



42,914.17 



i,M,774.73 

193,840.78 

• 3,608.94 

»,< 16,428.92 

103,011.22 



282,347.29 



388,350.48 

4,214,880.92 

129,946.04 

124,461.35 



4,867,638. 7» 



828,856.45 
285.327.96 
528,231.58 
634,279.21 



2,276,695.20 



112,635.78 
36,392.98 
98.001.82 

156,672.53 



403,603.11 



116,49555 
39,327.47 
107,365.51 
326,665.57 



589,854.10 



i,» 164.51 
»,«20.41 
1,471.97 

9,432.96 

»,n,180.15 

37,272.01 

66,682.95 



4,904. 1» 

34,957.32 
80,633.56 
77,688.32 
107,654.34 



» Deduct. 

* Credit on Palomns svstem, principal feature No. 4, in April, 1919, due to transfer to principal feature 
No. 1. 

'Credit of $7, .563 .34 on Leasburg Canal extension, In February, 1919, due to transfer of charges to principal 
feature No. 5. .\ctual co^t for the vear, $ll,202.2.S. 

«Credl^ of $22,456.04 on San Mipiiel iJranch of We^t Side Canal, In November, 1918, due to transfer of 
charges to principal feature No. ft. Actual co^t diu-inp the year, $6,027.12. 

» Credit of $164.51 on preliminary surveys, drainage, project as a whole In April, 1919, due to transfer to 
principal featun No. 1. 

• Credit of $21.41. drainage, Palomas svstera, preliminary in April, 1919, due to transfer toprincipal feature 
No. 1. 

» Credit of $1,190.31 on excavation and minor stnictures, ea^ drain. .Vrtual co^t during year, $10.16. 



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NEW MEXICO-TEXAS^ BIO GRANDE PBOJECT. 269 

Feature costs ^ Rio Omde ^o;«ct— Continued. 



Features. 



Drainage system— Gontlnned. 

MesiUa Valley system— Continued. 

Lower Leasburg drain 

Antbony drain 

La Mesa drain 

Chamberino drain 

Vinton drain 

Park drain 

Upper Leasburg drain 

Central drain 

Del Rio drain, right of way 

El Paso Valley system- 
Surreys and testing, undistributed 

Mesa drain 

Middle drain 

Franklin drain (formerly called Fabens drain). 

Clint spur drain 

Island drain 

River drain 

Montova surveys 

Tomillo district surveys 



Subtotal 

Flood protection: 

Project as a whole, preliminary 

Palomas Valley system 

Rinoon Vall^ system 

Leasburg system, cut-off in river channel. . 

MesiUa valley system 

El Fmo Valley system 

Hontoya district^ surveys and testing 



.Sab(4)MU. 



Power syatem: Tranamlsaion lines. 
Subtotal 



Farm units: 

Subdivi^ian surveys, project as a whole. 

Palomas Valley system 

Rincon Valley system 

Leasburg Valley s]rstem 

MesiUa Valley system 

El Paso Valley system . 



Montoya Valley system . 
Tomillo district 

Subtotal 



Permanent improvements: 
; system — 



Roids 

MesilU Valley system- 
Buildings 

Ro^ds 

El Paso system— Buildings 

Rincon Valley system— Buildings. 

Mootoya District— 

Buildinra 

Roads, Elephant Butte Dam.. 

Subtotal 



Fiscal year 



$39,973.01 
27,468.95 
43,434.46 
14,679.72 
21,226.18 
17,442.24 
6,084.14 
17,634.62 
8.66 

10,392.82 

83,108.37 

53,639.83 

62,662.79 

7,990.12 

33,506.45 

360.44 

27.09 

1,307.31 



Total to June 
1919. 



544,416.52 



»,« 3,749.84 

»,«33.43 

479.57 

908.02 

1,127.50 

1,163.22 

76.53 



133.43 



l,« 1,294.14 



11,204.14 



«»»244.40 

M 3,352. 33 

287.79 

541.89 

676.60 

Ml, 108. 97 

1,852.92 

2,657.88 



1,311.38 



>»"S19.73 

185.00 
>>• 1,511.42 



•210.28 
847.62 



1588.25 



$30,009.42 
28,904.27 
43,482.07 
14,608.61 
21,252.57 
17,460.86 
6,084.14 
17,634.62 
8.66 

85,117.97 

181,988.29 

94,060.50 

62,720.58 

7,990.12 

33,596.45 

18,123.92 

1,328.89 

1,307.31 



930,535.96 



479.57 

14,780.61 

6,668.70 

2,986.48 

76.53 



24,861.89 



2,005.83 



21,142.81 
15,072.39 
53,08L81 
26,853.04 
1,852.92 
2,657.88 



122,666.68 



3,053.02 
10,376.60 

1,543.90 



1,38L26 
3,236.83 

847.62 
26,612.37 



47,050.60 



1 Deduct. 

* Creait of $3,749.81 OD flood protection, in April, 1919, project as a whole, due to proration of these charges 
to the different valleys. 

* Credit of $33.43 on Palomas Valley system, in April, 1919, due to transfer of charges to principal feature 
No. 1. 

* Credit on $1,294.14 on power svstem, in April, 1919, due to transfer of charges to principal feature No. 2. 
^ } Credit of $244.40 on farm units, project as a whole, due to credit of $2,250.23, in April, 1910; the latter 

amount was prorated to the various valleys. 

* Cr )dit of $3,.')52.33 on firm imits, Palomas Valley system, in April, 1919, dua to transfer of charges to 
principal feature No. 1. 

* Credit of $1,108.97 on flood protection, El Paso Valley system, due to credit of $1,807 in March, 1919, 
this amount bHng transferred to Montoya district at that time. 

* Credits due to transfer to canal system. 

'Credit of $91.97 on pdrmanent improvements, RIneon Valley, buildings, due to transfer to principal 
/eature No. 12. Actual cost during year, $302.25. 



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270 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 
Feature costs, Rio Grande project — Continued. 



Features. 


Fiscaiyear 
1919. 


Total to June 
30, 1919. 


Telephone system: 

L^asbuTK systom 




$1,400.52 


Me<«illa system .... . . 


■■ : 


8 761.24 


Rincon yyst eni '. 




7.57 




— 




Subtotal 


10,169.3a 






Subtotal 


$1,292,183.74 
169,675.60 

1,461,859.34 


9,046,576.67 


Opt ration and maintenance during etmnruct ion (water-rtntal basi?) — 
Total co?t ofconUniction Teatures 


507,300.23 
9,553,875.90' 






Balance in plant accoimts: 

El Paso 




337, 148. 87 


Klepliant Butte '. 


1 


• 120,779.68^ 







216,369.19 








CI !arin^ acco^mts (unid Justed ) 




5,051.27 








Oro^s con^tniction con to June 30, 1919 


1,461,859.34 


9,775,296.36- 



Less revenues earned durtng constniction period: 

Rental of buildings 

Rental ol Rrazing and farming lands 

Net po A'er earnings (prior to public notic; ) 

Rental of irrigat ion water 

Cont factor's freight refunds (shown in error in Seventeenth Annual 



Report as rental of telephone ^d lolls). 
;inec 



Other revenues, unclassified.. . 

Other Ot).'ration-5, imclassifled. .". . . .' ' .'. '. . . . 

Suspended contract co>t, Knowles <t Waiteh Contract No. 777. 
Trolit on hospital operations 



Total 

Net eo3t of project.. 



1,2)1.59 
100.22 



22:j,312.64 

.T56.77 ; 

189.86 ' 
39,8i4.16 
> 4,940. 12 
2,672.41 , 

263,077.53 



13,898.55 

10&22 

2,243.33 

644,016. 2r 

5,883.64 
877.46 



7,601.00' 



674,628.47 



1,198,781.81 i 9,100,667.8© 



i Deduct. 
Statement of cost by calendar yearsy Rio Grande project. 





Construction. 


Operation 
ana mainte- 
nance during 
canstruction. 


Total. 


Year endmg Doc. 31— 

1906 


$24,589.24 
141,484.18 
163,567.87 
105,421.86 
334,599.30 
585,991.02 
859,515.72 
942,232.25 

2,099,399.24 
901,476.03 
520,271.63 
476,912.70 

1,054,710.90 
846,403.83 




$24,580.3i 


1907 


$2,398.86 

2,400.51 

1 890.88 

4,435.18 

5,303.18 

5,587.05 

23,864.19 

30,736.25 

47,770.61 

58,346.46 

78,764.78 

124,295.63 

121,506.65 


143,883.04 


1908 


155, 968. 38^ 


1909 


107,312.74 


1910 


339, 034. 4» 


1911 


591,294. 20- 


1912 


865,102.77 


1913 


966,096.44 


1914 


2,130,136.49- 


1915 


949,246.64 


1916 


578,617.99 


1917 


555,677.48 


1918 


1,179, 006. 6St 


To Juno 30, 1919 


9Q7,010.4» 








9,046,575.67 

216,369.19 

6,051.27 


507,300.23 


9, 553, 876. 9(^ 


Plant accounts to June 30, 1919 


216,300.19 


filflarfng vcmipts to June 30, 1919. . . 




6,061.37 








Total 


9.267,996.13 


507,300.23 


9,776,296.38 







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NEW MEXICO-TEXAS, RIO GRANDE PR0JEC5T. 
Stutement of cost by fiscal years ^ Rio Grande project. 



271 



Construction. 



Oneration 
and mainte- 
nance during 
construction. 



Total. 



Year ending June 30- 

1907 

1908 

1909 

1910 

1911 

1912 

1913 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918. 



180,767.29 
174,949.01 
113,335.41 
250,654.15 
503,292.41 
777,317.32 
947,304.36 
1,451,013.42 
1,500,688.47 
940,642.06 
382,841.93 : 
813,506.10 
1919 1,292,183.74 



12, 138. 18 

1,167.54 

6,856.40 

5, 68a 44 

5,678.88 

7,447.45 

33.490.27 

47,277.71 

41,396.66 

68,586.76 

117,904.34 

109,675.60 



189,757.20 

177,087.10 

114,502.95. 

266,510.55 

306,972.85 

782,906.20 

954,761.81 

1,484,603.60 

1,647,966.18 

982,038.72 

461,42&ae 

931,500.44 

1,461,850.34 



Subtotal I 0,046,575.67 

Plant accounts to June 30, 1019 216,360.19 

Clearing accounts to June 30, 1919 1 5,051.27 



507,300.23 



9,563,875.90 

216,360.10 

5,051.27 



Total I 0,267,006.13 



507,300.23 



0,775,206.36 



Estimated cost of contemplated worh^ Rio Grande project, during fiscal year 1920. 



Principal features. 



I Subfeature. 



Examination and surveys: 

Elephant Butte silt surveys. 
Bfiscellaneous 



$3,000 
1,000 



Storage: Elephant Butte balanced valves 

Canal svstem: 

Rincon Valley, Hatch Canal 

El Paso Valley, Mexican Dam sluiceway . 

lateral system: 

Rincon Valley 

MesUlaVaUey 

El Paso Valley 



Dramage system: 
MesUla Valley.. 
ElPasoVaUey. 



3,000 
85,000 
130,000 



350,000 
175,000 



Irrigable lands, farm units 

Pomanait improvements and lands 

Operation and maintenance daring construction (water rental basis) . 



TotaL. 



Principal 
feature. 



$4,000 
4,000 



16,000- 



210,000 



525,000 

10,000v 

1,500- 

220,500 



1,000,000. 



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HOETH DAKOTA, HOETH DAKOTA PUMPIFG PEOJECT. 

W. S. Arthur, project manager, Williflton, N. Dak. 

LOCATION. 

County: Williams. 

Townships: 152 to 155 N., Re. 100 to 104 W., fifth principal meridian. 

Railroad: Great Northern. 

Railroad stations and estimated population June 30, 1919: Buford, 75; Trenton, 160; 
and Marley (less than 25), on Bufora-Trenton unit are small unincoroorated villages. 
Williston, on the Williston unit, is an incorporated city of about 5,300 population. 

WATER SUPPLY. 

Source of water supply: Missouri River. 
Area of drainage basin: 155,000 square miles. 

Mean run-off of Missouri River, near Williflton, May to October, 1905 to 1907: 
15,000,000 acre-feet. 

AaRIOTTLTinEtAL AND CLIMATIC CONDITIONS. 

Area for which the service is prepared to supply water, season 1919: Buford-Trenton 
unit, 4,049 acres; Williston unit, 8,189 acres. 

No part of the project was irrigated in 1918. The Williston unit is being operated 
for commercial power, under a contract with the city of Williston. Irrigation was 
resumed June 1, 1919, under a contract with the Williston irrigation district. 

Length of irrigation season: 80 days, beginning from June 1 to June 15. 

Average elevation of the irri^ble area: 1,900 feet above sea level. 

Rainfall: The actual precipitation, calendar year 1918, was 13.84 inches. The 
average for 15 years, beginning in 1904, is 13.50 inches. In 1918, 50 per cent of the 
precipitation came after the growing season. 

Range of temperature on the irrigable area: —49** to 107** F. 

Chapter of soil on irrigable area: Ranges from sandy loam to heavy clay gumbo. 

Principal products: Alfalfa, grains, vegetables. The production of com for sila^ 
is increasing as well as the output of hogs, and dairying has become well established. 

Principal markets: St. Paul, Minneapolis, Dulum, Chicago. The local market is 
now important since it consumes all of the butter product and all of the output from 
the dairies. 

LANDS OPENBP FOR IRRI0ATION. 

Dates of public notices and orders: Buford-Trenton unit, April 8, 1908; March 9, 
Mav 13, 1911; June 25, 1912; July 15, 1913; February 26, March 7, 1914. Williston 
unit, April 27, November 30, 1908; April 30, 1909; March 9, April 14, 1911; June 25, 
1912; March 11, June 23, July 15, July 21, 1913; February 26, March 7, 1914. 

Location of lands opened: Buford-Trenton unit, Tps. 152 and 153 N., Rs. 103 and 
104 W., fifth principal meridian; Williston unit, Tps. 154 and 155, N., Rs. 100 and 
101 W., fiftli principal meridian. 

Limit of area of farm units: Public, 80 acres; private, 160 acres. 

Duty of water: Two acre-feet per acre per annum at the farm. 

Building charge per acre of irrigable land: $38 under public notice of 1908. 

Annual operation and maintenance charge: 70 cents per acre of irrigable land and 
50 cents per acre-foot of water actually used, under public notices of 1908; $1.50 per 
acre of irrigable land and $1 per acre-foot of water used under order of May 13, 1911. 
For season of 1914 the project was on a rental basis and the terms were $1 per acre, 
including 1 acre-foot of water, and $1 per acre-foot for water delivered in excess of 
1 acre-foot per acre. For the season of 1919 the irrigation district fixed the operation 
and maintenance charge at $1 per acre, which includes 1 acre-foot of water, and $2 
per acre-foot for water delivered in excess of 1 acre-foot per acre. 

272 



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NORTH DAKOTA, NORTH DAKOTA PUMPING PROJECT. 273 

CHBONOLOaiCAL SUMMABT. 

Reconnoissance and preliminary surveys be^n in 1903. 

Construction recommended by board of engineers September 22, 1905. 

C-onstruction authorized by Secretary January 23, 1906. 

First division: Buford-Trenton unit completed November, 1907. 

Power and pumping plants: Williston unit, completed for present use in the fall 
of 1907; first division completed in the spring of 1908. 

Pumping plant and transmission lines: Buford-Trenton unit, completed for present 
use in the spring of 1908. 

First irrigation by Reclamation Service, season of 1908: 

Power installation completed for 2,000 horsepower June 30, 1910. 

Buford-Trenton unit, 38 per cent completed June 30, 1918; Williston unit, 64 per 
cent completed June 30, 1918. 

Entire project, 64 per cent completed June 30, 1918. 

UtRIQATION PLAN. 

The irrigation plan of the North Dakota pumping project provides for a central 
team-power plant located near Williston, operating pumps and generating elec- 
tricity for the operation of other pumps on the Buford-Trenton and Williston units. 
On the Buford-Trenton unit water is pumped from a barge into a settling basin 30 
feet above the river, and is then lifted by a permanent pumping station into a canal, 
50 feet above the settling basin, for the irrigation of bencn lands near Buford. A 
transmission line 28.3 miles in length delivers power for the operation of the pumps. 
The plan of the Williston unit provides for a series of motor-dnven centrifugal pumps 
on a barge in the Missouri River, a settling basin receiving the water from the oarge, 
and a main canal of 90 second-feet capacity extending along Little Muddy Creek to 
the power plant, where two sets of steam-tfriven turbines operate centrifugal pumps 
to lift water 51 feet into E Canal. From the main canal, about midway between the 
river and the power plant electrically driven pumps raise 35 second-feet 28 feet into 
B Canal, and irom the B Canal 20 second-feet are raised an additional 28 feet into 
C Canal. The main power station is located close to a 9-foot vein of Lignite coal, from 
which fuel is obtained. 

The United States claims all waste, seepage, spring, and percolating water arising 
within the project, and proposes to use such water in connection therewith. 

The features of the above irrigation plan which have been completed are: The 
central power station, coal mine and transmission lines; at Buford-Trenton unit, 
two pumping stations, settling basin, and canal system; at Williston unit, four pump- 
ing stations, two settling basins, and canal system. No construction work is in 
pr^ess at present. 

Features remaining for future construction are: The enlargement of the power house 
and installation of additional machinery; at Buford-Trenton unit, extension of High- 
line Canal and construction of Lowline Canal and laterals for irrigation of bottom lands: 
at Williston unit, construction of east and west bottom canal systems, with additional 
intake and pumping stations. 

SXTMMABT OF GENERAL DATA FOR NORTH DAKOTA FUMPINa 
PROJECT TO END OF FISCAL TEAR 1919. 

Areas: 

Irrigable acreage when project is complete 26, 151 

Public land entered to June 30, 1919 1 259 

Public land open to entry on June 30, 1919 532 

State land June 30, 1919 1,073 

Private land June 30, 1919 24, 287 

Acreage service could have supplied in season of 1918 12, 238 

Estimated acreage service can supply in season of 1919 12, 238 

Estimated acreage service can supply in season of 1920 12, 238 

Acreage dry farmed season of 1918 (estimated) 3, 000 

Crops: ===== 

Value of dry-fanned crops season of 1918 |12, 000 

Value of dry-fanned crops per acre cropped |4 

Finances: === 

Net constniction cost to June 30, 1919 $711, 690. 96 

Per cent completed on June 30, 1919 64 

Appropriated for fiscal year 1920 $85, 000. 00 

Estimated per cent complete by June 30, 1920 64 

138554—19 ^18 



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274 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL BEPOBT OF BECLAMATION SEBVICE. 

Finance — Continued . 

Proposed appropriation fiscal year 1921 |119,000 

Estimated per cent complete by June 30, 1921 64 

Announced construction charges per acre $38.00 

Appropriation fiscal year 1919 $64,000.00 

Increased compensation 2, 556. 49 

Increase miscellaneous collections 61, 149. 65 

$127, 706. 14 

Expenditures chargeable to 1919 appropriation: 

Disbursements $63, 124. 40 

Transfers 5, 092. 01 

Current liabilities 10, 110. 13 

Contingent liabilities 78, 326. 54 

Unemcumbered balance on July 1, 1919 49, 379. 60 

Repayments: 

Value of construction water-right contracts 290, 803. 74 

Construction charges — 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 8,863.18 

Collected to June 30, 1919 8, 863. 18 

Operation and maintenance charges (public notice) — 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 24,278.91 

Collected to June 30, 1919 12, 964. 28 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 11, 314. 68 

Water-rental charges — 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 2, 948. 68 

Collected to June 30, 1919 2, 149.03 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 799. 55 

Power charges — ' 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 173,931.51 

Collected to June 30, 1919 170,958.46 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 2, 973. 05 

Drainage: Miles of open drains built to June 30, 1919 12. 7 

Cost of drainage works to June 30, 1919 $3,546.95 

ECONOMIES OF GOVERNMENT WORE. 

Coal mine, — ^During the fiscal year 1919 all coal was taken from 
blocks 1 and 2 north and blocks 1 and 2 south in the new east work- 
ings • 2^000 feet of entries were driven m blockmg out coal bodies for 
the UTigation season 1J919. Two thousand five hundred feet of new 
track were laid, an inside parting was built in the mine to divide the 
haulage work during the irrigation season, electric lights were installed 
to the inside partmg, the airways and entries were permanently 
timbered, and a mine telephone was installed. These are in the 
nature of development, but the costs were placed against the cost of 
coal which was $20,880 for 10,703 tons mined or $1.95 per ton. 

Since $4,000 of the cost was development work, the cost for coal pro- 
duced, including the maintenance of workings, was $16,880 or $1.57 J. 

Coal for power plant was sold in the community for $2.50 per ton 
and for domestic purposes for $3.50 per ton. The coal mining opera- 
tions therefore show a saving of 92J cents per ton over coal sold for 
similar service or $1.92^ over coJ sold for domestic purposes. 

The schedule of wages paid in the coal mine was 40 to 60 per cent 
higher than during the preceding year. 



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NORTH DAKOTA, NORTH DAKOTA PUMPING PROJECT. 275 
OOIOCEBCIAL POWER. 

The contract with the city of Williston, dated October 16, 1912, 
covering the delivery of surplus electrical energy from the power 
plant, remained in force, ana the plant was in operation the entire 
year to funUsh power under this contract. An agreement in amend- 
ment was executed January 1, 1919, covering an increase in rates. 
The increase is equivalent to 23 per cent on the average load of the 
six years* life of the contract andfis contemplated to offset increased 
generating costs. 

During the year 1,009,147 kilowatt-hours of electrical enei^y were 
delivered to tne city switchboard. This was a decrease of 17,8'>3 
kilowatt-hours over the previous year. This decrease was due to the 
effectiveness of a lightless n^ht order of the Fuel Administration 
during the war and to a day%ht saving order promulgated by Con- 
gress. During the month of June 3 interruptions from 25 minutes to 
5 hours occurred, due to lightning striking the transmission line and 
destroying poles. 

The commercial power operations show a loss of $6,738.47 due 
principally, however, to a large amount of maintenance work neces- 
sarily taken on in connection with the resimxption of irrigation opera- 
tions inasmuch as the costs were prorated inproportion to the antic- 
ipated benefit of the maintenance work. This toss was further due 
to the rapid advance in labor and supply costs while the receipts from 
sales were fixed by contract. On January 1, 1919, a revised contract 
became effective at increased rates which resulted in profits for the 
last two months of the fiscal year. 

Sale of eommerdal potoer, North Dakota pumping project. 



July.... 

August 

September. 
October.... 
November. 
December.. 



1018. 



Subtotal. 



Jamiary... 
February. 
March'. . . . 

April 

May 

June 



1010. 



Subtotal 

Sales to employees. 



Cost. 



I 



This 

m<Mith, 

fbcalyear 

1910. 



S2,422.53 
2,660.28 
2,776.24 
3,076.38 
4,672.82 
4,801.47 



Total, I This 

Dec. 20, i month, 

1912, fiiicalvear 
to date. 191&. 



I 



1128,975.90 
131,636.18 , 
134,412.42 i 
137,488.80 
142,061.62 
146,953.09 , 




12,401.00 $140,46^.95 
2,391.00 , 142,859.95 1 
2,453.00 I 145,312.95 | 
2,719.76 148,032.73 ' 
2,833.50 150,866.23 
3,144.00 1.54,010.23 , 



20,399.72 15,942.28 



1121.53 
1269.28 
1323.24 
1356.60 
1,739.32 
1,747.47 



14,457.44 



4,370.67 1 

4,430.20 

4,441.52 

3,716.91 

2,622.63 

2,757.18 



151,139.42 ' 
15.5,603.27 I 
159,944.79 j 
163,661.70 I 
166,284.33 
160,041.51 



3,85.3.52 ' 
3,418.75 I 
3,43.5.75 
3, 167. 13 
3,073.08 1 
2,973.05 ' 



157,803.75 
161,282.50 
164,718.25 
167,885.38 
170,958.46 
173,931.51 



1 517. 15 

1 1,011.45 ' 

1 1,005.77 

1549.78 

450.45 

215.87 



22,339.11 



19,921.28 1 12,417.83, 



GrandtoUI 42,738.83 « 169,041.51 ! 35,863.56 « 173,931.51 



iLoss. 



$11,493.05 
11,223.77 
10,900.63 
10,543.93 
8,804.61 
7,057.14 



6,639.99 
5,528.54 
4,522.77 
3,972.00 
4,423.44 
4,639.31 



130.80 



16,875.27 « 4,776. 11 



< Totals to date; not column totals. 



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276 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 



OPEItATION AND MAINTENANCE. 

During the fiscal year 1919 the power plant, coal mine, and trans- 
mission line to Williston were operated. The water users and land- 
owners completed the organization of the Williston irrigation district 
and executed a contract based upon the requirements of the Secre- 
tary of the Interior. The Secretary approved the contract April 5, 
1919, preparations for irrigation were hastened, and the irrigation of 
-lands oegan on schedule time June 1, 1919. 

June, the last month of the fiscal year and the first of the irrigation 
season, opened with a deficiencj' of moisture and remained very dry; 
consequently there was a comparatively large demand for irrigation 
water, with prospects for more extensive irrigation before the close 
of the irrigation season. 

Historical review^ North Dakota pumping project. 
WILLISTON UNIT. 



Item. 


1 
1914 1 1915 

1 1 


1916 


1917 


1918 


1919 


Area for which service was prepared to supply water. . 
Acreaee irrigated 


1 1 

8,189 , 8,189 ' 
1 056 '........ 


8,189 


8,189 


8,189 


8,189 
1 177 


Miles of canal operated 

Water diverted (aero-feet) 


30 ! 1 








27 


' 2,671 1 i 








1,717 
991 


Water delivered to land (acre-feet) 


i;792 ' ' 








Water per acre of land irrigatod (acre-fort) 


1.70 i 








.86 












BUFORD-TRENTON UNIT. 



Area for which service was prepared to supply water . . 4, 049 i 4, 049 4, 049 4, 049 4, 049 4, 049 



SBTTLBMBNT. 

Settlement remained practically stationary because of the sus- 
pension of irrigation operations. After April 15, 1919, there was 
some return of landowners to their farms in order to prepare for irri- 
gation during the season of 1919. This movement was small because 
of the lateness of the approval of the irrigation district contract and 
the backwardness of the season. Much of the land was sown to 
spring wheat which would have been sufficiently prepared for irri- 
gation had the owners had another month of time. As the year 
closed, however, there is a marked improvement in the project lands 
and especially in the crops as compared with the nonimgated crops. 

Settlement data^ North Dakota pumping project. 

WILLISTON UNIT. 



Item. 



Total number of farms on project 

Population 

Total number of Irrigated farms 

Operated by owners or managers. , 

Operated by tenants 

Population 

Number of towns , 

Population , 

Population in towns and on farms. . . . . 

Number of public schools , 

Number of churches , 

Number of banks , 

Total capital stock 

Amount of deposits 

Nimiber of depositors 



1914 



146 
26 
18 
8 
72 
2 
4,700 
4,846 
4 
5 
3 



1915 



1916 



101 

163 I 

44 .. 

34 I 

10 I 
140 

2 : 

5,000 j 
5,163 

5 > 

6 I 
3 i 

$135,000 



101 
175 



34 

10 

152 

2 

5,000 

5,175 

5 

6 

3 

$185,000 



.11,300,000 $1,500,000 
3,000 j 3,300 



1917 



105 
190 



34 

10 

165 

2 

5,300 

5,490 

6 

6 

4 

$235,000 

$1,800,000 

3,500 



1918 



105 
195 



83 

11 

160 

2 

5,360 

5,555 

6 

6 

4 

$260,000 

$2,000,000 

3,800 



1919 



106 

aoo 



33 

24 

181 

2 

5,400 

5,600 

6 

6 

4 

$260,000 

$1,756,000 

3,600 



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NORTH DAKOTA, NORTH DAKOTA PUMPING PROJECT. 



277 



Settlement data, North Dakota pumping project — Continued. 

BUFORD-TRENTON UNIT. 



Item. 



Total number of farms on project 

Population. flO 

Nimiber of irrigated farms 

Operated by owners or managers. . . 10 

Operated by tenants 23 

Number of towns 2 

Population 350 

Total population on farms and in towns . 419 

Number of churches 2 

Number of banks 1 

Total capital stock $10,000 

Amount of deposits ;$iOO,000 

Number of depositors 200 



1914 



1915 



19 

23 

2 

350 

420 

2 

2 

120,000 

1115,000 

240 



1916 



19 

23 

2 

400 

470 

2 

2 

120,000 

1115,000 

240 



1917 



19 

23 

2 

400 

470 

2 

2 

120,000 

1120,000 

250 



1918 



19 

23 

2 

425 

495 

2 

2 

120,000 

$110,000 

260 



1919 



42 
70 



19 

23 

2 

425 

495 

2 

2 

120,000 

1110,000 

260 



PRINCIPAL CROPS. 

The principal crop this year will of necessity be grain. A few 
tracts of old alfalfa were revived by the earlv water and will be 
restored to former productivity. Approximately 25 per cent of the 
grain acreage is nnrse crop for aHalfa, assuring a new start in alfalfa 
m 1920. This is one of the most valuable results of the 1919 season, 
although the war price guaranteed for wheat assures a good return 
from that crop, rotatoes are doing well. A considerable acreage, 
prepared too late for grain, was put in millet and other feed crops 
ancl, with water, will carry the stock over to next year. 

FINANCIAL STATBHENT. 

Condensed balance sheets North Dakota pumping project^ June 30, 1919. 

Inventory of material and supplies on hand $13, 606. 74 

Accounts receivable 297,110.79 

Gross construction cost $721, 163. 23 

Less construction revenue earnings 9,472.27 

Net ooDstniction cost 711,690.9ft 

Gross operation and maintenance cost 272,277.67 

Less operation and maintenance earnings 4,633.29 

267,644.3a 

Accounts payable .' 10,1H3.64 

Collections and contracts of specific amounts for repayments to reclamation ftind 291, 438. 18 

Misoellaneoas accruals 29,945.48 

Capital investment: 

Disbursement, transfer, and Joint construction vouchers received 1, 376, 345. 42 

Collection, transfer, refund, and Joint construction vouchers issued 417, 859. 85 

Not investment 958,485.« 



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278 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL BEPOBT OF BBOLAMATION SEBVIGE. 
FtaivTt C08ts of North Dakota pumping project to June SO, 1919. 



PliDOipal features. 



flzamlnation and sarreys. . 

Lateral system: 

WUllstonunit 

Buford-Trenton unit . . . 



Power system: 
WUUston unit- 
Coal mine — 

WilUston barge. 

WiUistontransmissioiiUne 

Pumping station No. 4 

Pumping station No. 2 

Wllliston power house 

Transformer station at barge 

Floating boom at baige 

Scow pontoon. 

Buford-Trenton unit— 

Buford-Trenton transmission line .... 

Buford-Trenton barge 

Pumping substation A 

Boom and scow pontoon 

Extension to WUliston power house. . 



Permanent improvements and lands: 

WUliston unit 

Buford-TroDton unit 



Operation and maintenance charges transferred to and compounded with 
oonstruction charges. 



Total cost of construction featuns . , 



Unadjusted dealing accounts: 

BufDrd-Trenton construction materials and equipment sold— 
Buford-Trenton barge. . 



Buford-Trenton pumpUig substation A.. 

Miscellaneous salvage 

Transmission line 



Gross construction cost to June 80, 1919.. 



Less revenues earned during constmotion period: 

Rentals of buildings ^.. 

Rentals of Irrigation water 

Contractors' freight refunds 



Net oonstruction cost to June 30, 1910. 



Fiscal year 
1919. 



Total to 
June 80, 1919. 



f6,10S.02 



5,105.02 



12,085.94 

1U,172.25 

11.00 

15,805.11 



120,743.30 



115,587.58 



115,587.58 



$44,959.88 



141,292.90 
58,405.88 



199,599.71 



14,224.51 

39,547.14 

15,439.30 

8,281.50 

14,065.75 

176,803.80 

2,742.19 

772.64 

1,411.38 

25,345.99 
35,583.58 
35, 127. n 
787.50 
75,329.35 



449,562.12 



22,712.06 
5,850.18 



28,552.21 



22,19L98 



744,965.87 



15,229.54 

112,120.79 

1 17.81 

15,454.40 



123.822.64 



721,168.28 



8,760.44 

196.75 

5,405.06 



9,472.27 



7U,590.96 



> Deduct. 



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NORTH DAKOTA, NORTH DAKOTA PUMPING PROJECT. 279 

Statement of cost by calendar years, North Dakota pumping project. 



Yeta ending Dec. 31— 

1907 

1908 

1900 

1910 

1911 

1912 

1913 

1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

Jan. 1 to June 30, 1919. 



SobtotaL 

Plant aooonnts to Jnne 30, 1919 . 



Total. 



Operation and 

rtmmtnyotirm maintenance 
CoMtrucUon. i under pubUc 

I notice. 



$428, 
202, 
69, 

1: 



985.77 
774.81 
221.31 
432. 17 
392.45 
988.70 
666.33 



>4, 
26,728.77 



4, 



102.46 
385.44 



721,163.23 



721,163.23 



$34,444.47 
45,106.43 
41,915.42 
35,206.63 
49,650.74 
47,049.05 
51,114.82 
4,473.35 
26,014.45 

< 85, 709. 78 
< 1,552.71 
19,447.55 



267,070.42 
5,207.25 



272,277.67 



Total cost. 



$428,085.77 

237,219.28 

114,327.74 

54,347.59 

40,599.06 

48,662.04 

42,382.72 

51,114.82 

31,202.12 

26,014.45 

«86,T09.78 

124,655.17 

23,832.00 

088,233.66 
5,207.25 



093,440.00 



> Decrease. 

s Decrease due to transfer of oost of prodncing commercial power to net power revennes. 

* Decrease due to sale of Bnford-Trenton equipment. 

4 Decrease due to distribution of esUmated plant depreciation. 

Statement of oost by fiscal years, North Dakota pumping project. 





Construction. 


Operation and 

under public 
notice. 


Total cost. 


Year ending June 30— 

1907 


$182,924.99 

380,539.00 

128,193.39 

12,402.55 

9 354.13 

4,403.75 

14,961.03 

294.70 

22,191.03 

4,536.84 




$182,924.99 
880,539.00 
183,326.08 
65,368.00 
46,987.40 
40,851.72 


1906 




1909 


$55,133.54 
42,065.45 
37,633.27 
36,447.07 
58,968.25 
48,617.27 
20,179.98 
21,611.18 

172,084.56 
16,131.64 
23; 729. 66 


1910 


1911 


1912 


1913 


54 007.22 
48,911.97 
42,371.91 
26,147.97 
172,084.56 


1914 


1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 


18,070.34 
M5;637.68 


I9.2ia88 


1919 


8,091.98 






SobtotaL 


721,163.23 


267,070,42 


988,283.66 




Plant accounts on Jnne 30, 1919 




5,207.26 


5,207.26 






Total 


721,168.23 


272,277.67 


998,44a 90 





1 Decrease. * Decrease due to sale of Buford-Trenton equipment. 

Estimated oost of contemplated work, North Dakota pumping project, fiscal year 19t0, 



Principal features. 



Operation and mainten ance under public notice 
Relmbursal^ acvuiuils 

Total. 



Estimated 
cost. 



$84,000 

1.000 



85,000 



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280 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 



Operating costs and revenues^ North Dakota pumping project. 



Calendar year 1918. 



Opera- 
tion. 



Pumpinff for Irrigation: 

WiiUston pumping station No. 1 . 

Wiiliston pumping station No. 2. 

Wiilistcn pumping station No. 3. 

Wiiliston pumping station No. 4. 

Buford pumping station No. 1. . . 

Buford pumping station No. 2. . 

Wiilistcn power nouse irrigation. 

Wiiliston transmission line 

Buford-Trenton transmission 
line 

Wlllist'^n telephone system 

Buford-Trenton telephone sys- 
tem 

Buildings 



Total piunping for irrigation. 

Lateral system: 

Wiiliston unit 

Buford-Trenton unit 



Total lateral system. 



Commercial power, preparatory. 



Subtotal 

Less unpaid operation and mainte- 
nance charges added to construc- 
tion 



Total.. 



REVENUES. 

Ox>eration and maintenance charges 
accrued on contract wth water- 
right appli ants 

Operation and maintenance charges 
paid in advance by water-right 
applicants 

Operation and maintenance paid 
and forfeited by water-right appli- 
cants 

Penalties on operation and mainte- 
nance charges a^ rued on con tracts 
with water-right appli(«its 

Rental of lands and buildings during 
operating period 

Rental of irrigating water 

Other revenues, unclassified, earned 
during operating period 



I $244. 98 
1449.93 
> 136. 17 
1 737. 32 
» 396. 17 
» 4,147.43 
» 176.28 

1525.09 
» 13. 14 



Mainte- 
nance. 



$73.22 

.50 

56.76 



61.18 



2,353.84 
321.47 



72.81 



993.74 



16,826.51 3,932.52 



Total. 



$73.22 

• » 244. 48 

» 394. 17 

1 136. 17 

1 676. 14 

1 396. 17 

11,793.59 

146. 19 

1525.09 
59.67 



993.74 



12,893.99 



1,34L28 1,34L28 



1,341.28 ! 1,341.28 



16,826.51 



5,273.80] 1,552,71 



To end of calendar year. 



Opera- 
tion. 



$240.88 

2,932.72 

21,6ia45 

2,213.19 

22,912.84 

26,665.32 

89,650.96 

633.12 

3,047.23 
583.13 

1,087.27 



171,467.11 



Mainte- 
nance. 



$149.47 

781.01 

4,7n.75 

468.54 

3,488.36 

6,011.96 

26,22L08 

966.60 

1, 



Total. 



292.67 



155.13 
5,824.16 



$390.35 

3,713.73 

26,322.20 

2,68L73 

26.40L20 

32,667.28 

115,772.04 

1,599.72 

4,939.61 
875.80 

1,242.40 
5,824.16 



50,963.11 I 222,430.22 



17,369.35 1 
7,100.90 



12,055.02 
1,528.77 



24,470.25 I 13,583.79 



9,330.54 



29,424.37 
8,629.67 



38,054.04 



9,330.54 



205,267.90 [ 64,546.901 269,814.80 



22,191.93 



1 $61.60 I 



61.60 t 



269. IS . 



«L04 1 



Total.. 



268.14 



Diflerenoe: I 

Excess I 1,820.85 I 

Deficit ' I 



247,622.87 

$24,278.91 
101.20 
217.87 

45.41 

3,108.93 
2,751.83 

1,445.74 



31,949.80 



215,672.98 



1 Credit due to distribution of estimated plant depreciation, $7,296.07. 



* Deduct. 



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OBEGOF, UMATILLA PEOJECT. 

n. M. Schilling, project manager, Henniston, Oreg. 

LOCATION. 

Counties: Umatilla and Morrow. 

Townships: 4 and 5 N., Rs. 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, and 29 E., Willamette meridian. 
Railroads: Oregon- Washington Railroad & Navigation Co.; Spokane, Portland 4i 
Seattle R. R. 

Railroad stations and estimated population June 30, 1919: Hermiston, 650; Uma- 
^ ilia, 300; Irrigon, 75; Boardman, 75; Messner and'Hinkle, junction points. 

WATBR SUPPLY. 

Source of water supply: Umatilla River. 
Area of drainage basin: 2,160 square miles. 

Annual run-off in acre-feet: Umatilla River at Yoakum (1,200 square miles), 1903. 
to 1918, maximum, 746,000; minimum, 250,000; mean, 526,000. 

AGRICXTLTTTBAL JCND CLIHATIC CONDITIONS. 

Area for which Service is prepared to supply water, season of 1919: ^,658 acres. 

Area under water-right applications, season of 1919: 19,215 acres. 

Length of irrigation season: From March 20 to October 16 — 210 daj-^. 

Average elevation of irrigable area: 470 feet above sea leve*. 

Rainfall on irrigable area: Average, 8.5 inches; 1918, 6.5 inches. 

Range of temperature on irrigable area: —28*^ to 115° F. (ordinary minimum, O'' F.). 

Character of soil, irrigable area: Sandy loam. 

Principal products: Alfalfa, fruits, berries, vegetables. 

Principal markets: Portland, Oreg.; Spokane and Seattle, Wash. 

LANDS OPENED FOR IBRIQATION. 

Dates of public notices and orders: December 27, 1907; August 3 and November 12. 
1908; April 3, 1909; January 6, 1910 (two); February 28 and May 16. 1911; March^ 
and May 8, 1912; March 3, April 7, June 23, July 15, and July 21, 1913; January 1^ 
and September 24, 1914; February 25, April 5, and December 12, 1915 (two); March 
16, April 12 (three), May 12, May 27, September 21, December 18, 1916; January 2, 
January 5, February 8, February 23, March 23, April 20, April 23, and December 11, 
1917; January 2, January 26, January 30, February 6, February 7, Februarv 16, March 
8, April 3, July 16 and November 25, 1918; March 12, Mav 24 and June 27, 1919. 

Location of lands opened: Ts. 4 and 5 N., Rs. 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, and 29 E., Wil- 
lamette meridian. 

Limit of area of farm units: Public, 40 acres; private, 160 acres. 

Dutv of water: Beneficial use. 

Building charge per acre of irrigable land: |60, $70, and $92. 

Annual operation and maintenance charge: Minimum charge 1918, $1.75 per acre. 

CHBONOLOOICAL STTMMABT. 

Reconnoissance and preliminary surveys begun in 1903. 

Construction recommended by board of engineers October 27, 1905. 

Construction authorized by Secretary December 4, 1905. 

Diversion dam and feed canal completed August, 1907. 

Cold Springs Dam completed June, 1908. 

First irrigation by Reclamation Service, season of 1908. 

Construction of west extension authorized December 22, 1913. 

West Extension (Three Mile Falls) Diversion Dam completed November 28, 1914.. 

West Extension Main Canal completed June, 1916. 

Entire project (including west extension) 94 per cent completed June 30, 1919. 

281 



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282 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

ntBIGATION PLAN. 

The irrigation plan of the Umatilla project provides for the diversion of water 
from the Umatilla River above Echo, Oreg., through a feed canal 24.5.mile8 long, 
into a storage reservoir. Water is diverted from the reservoir through an outlet canal, 
also from the feed canal by means of a by-pass connecting the feed and outlet canals. 
Water is also diverted from the Umatilla Kiver by the Maxwell Canal, heading near 
Butter Creek, and delivered into a distribution system from the reservoir, thus water- 
ing land in the Umatilla and Columbia River Valleys near Hermiston, Oreg. In 
addition some 11,300 acres bordering the Columbia River in the vicinity of Umatilla, 
Inigon, and Boardman, Oreg., will be watered by a canal diverting from the Umatilla 
River about halfway between Hermiston and Umatilla. 

The United States intends, for and in connection with the project, to use the waste, 
seepage, spring, and percolating water arising within the same, and asserts a right 
thereto by virtue of its reservation of all unappropriated waters of the project source 
of supply and of its appropriation of said waters in accordance with tne State law, 
heretofore made, for the purpose of the project. 

The features which have been completed are the diversion works above Echo, feed 
canal, Cold Springs Dam, by-pass^ diversion works for the Maxwell Canal, diversion 
works for the west extension, main distributarv from Cold Springs Reservoir, main 
distributary for the west extension, and laterals for the irrigable area now opened. 
Four drain ditches have been built. The main construction work in progress is the 
building of laterals in the west extension, also supplemental construction for lands 
east of the Umatilla River in order to deliver water as near as may be to the most 
commanding point of each 40 acres. 

ST7HHABY OF GENERAL DATA FOB X7KATILLA PROJECT TO END 
OF FISCAL YEAR 1010. 

Areas: 

Irri^tble acreage when project is complete 36, 300 

Public land entered to June 30, 1919 5, 078 

Public land open to entry on June 30, 1919 294 

Public land withdrawn on June 30, 1919 2, 398 

Railroad land June 30, 1919 3, 342 

Private land June 30. 1919 25,188 

Acreage service could have supplied in season of 1918 24, 658 

Estimated acreage service can supply in season 1919 24, 658 

Estimated aawe service can supply in season 1920 25, 000 

Acreage irrigated season of 1918 9,100 

Acreage cropped under irrigation, season of 1918 6,819 

Crops: 

Value of irrigated crops, season of 1918 $400,642.00 

Value of irrigated crops per acre cropped $58. 75 

Finances: 

Net construction cost to June 30, 1919 $2, 439, 732. 10 

Per cent completed on June 30, 1919 : . . . 94 

Appropriated for fiscal year 1920 $113, 000. 00 

Estunated per cent complete by June W, 1920 96 

Proposed appropriation for fiscal year 1921 $170, 000. 00 

Estimated per cent complete by June 30, 1921 98 

Announcea construction charges per acre $60, $70, $92 

Appropriation for fiscal year 1919 $80,000. 00 

Increase of compensation 4, 590. 31 

Increase miscellaneouB collections 31, 195. 68 

Balance 1918 appropriation 91, 035. 48 

$206,821.47 

Expenditures chai^geable to 1919 appropriation: 

Disbursements $92, 353. 40 

Transfers 7,785.87 

Current liabilities 4,033.14 

Contingent liabilities 127. 78 

104,300.19 

Unemciunbered balance on July 1, 1919 102, 521. 28 



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OREGON, UMATILLA PROJECT. 283 

Repayments: 

Value of construction water-right contracts \ $1, 581, 457. 32 

Construction charges — 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 332,826.11 

CoUectedtoJune30, 1919 318,492.33 

UncoUected on June 30, 1919 14,333.78 

Operation and maintenance charges (pubUc notice) — 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 153, 056. 97 

CoUectedtoJune30, 1919 131,742.74 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 21, 314. 23 

Water-rental charges- 
Accrued to June 30, 1919 21, 856. 59 

Collected to June 30, 1919 21,328.66 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 527. 93 

Drainage: 

Estimated acreage damaged by seepage to June 30, 1919 200 

Miles of open drains built to June 30^ 1919 10 

Estimated acreage protected by drains to June 30, 1919 2, 000 

Estimated acreage to be protected by authorized system 2, 000 

Cost of drainage works to June 30, 1919 $54, 812. 63 

OONSTBUCTION DXTUINa FISCAL YBAB. 

Distribvtion system, east side. — Fourteen thousand four hundred 
linear feet of small laterals were built as supplemental construction 
for five small districts. Four districts were comnleted. The work 
done consisted in laying 2,960 linear feet of 16-incn and 3,400 linear 
feet of 20-inch cement pipe. In addition 1,375 linear feet of lateral 
were lined with concrete 2 inches thick, involving the placing of 75 
cubic yards or 1,344 square yards of concrete. Twenty-five minor 
structures were Duilt, requirmg 25 cubic yards of concrete. Pipe 
yard operations, involving the making of 872 linear feet of 12-incn, 
6,782 Imear feet of 16-indi, and 5,086 linear feet of 20-inch cement 
pipe, were carried on. 

Supplemental construction for one small district was begun but 
will not be completed until some time diuing the coming year. 

West extension. — ^Two thousand six hundred and fifty-two linear 
feet of laterals were built. The work done consisted inlaying 1,316 
linear feet of 16-inch and 1,356 linear feet of 20-inch cement pipe. 
In addition 8 minor structures were built, involving the placing of 15 
cubic yards of concrete; 220 linear feet of lateral were lined with 
concrete 2 inches thick involving the placing of 6 cubic yards or 114 
square yards of concrete; and concrete footings were constructed and 
placed imder the barrel flume, requiring 26 cubic yards of concrete. 
A patrolman's cottage at the Three Mile Falls dam was constructed. 

OPERATION AND KAINTENANOE. 

Diversion of water to the feed canal for storage p\u*poses was 
resumed November 25, 1918, and was continued imtil June 1, 1919. 
Cold Springs Reservoir reached a maximiun storage of 47,700 acre- 
feet on May 31, 1919. The low flow of the Umatilla River pre- 
cluded a maximmn diversion imtil about February 1. Almost a 



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284 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL BEPOM OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

maximum diversion was maintained, however, from that time tmtil 
June 1. Water to the airioimt of 91,517 acre-feet was diverted by 
the feed canal, of which 1,345 acre-feet were wasted, 10,819 acre-feet 
were delivered under the Cunha contract, and 70,064 acre-feet 
delivered to Cold Springs Reservoir. Available storage on Jime 30, 
1919, was 36,900 acre-feet. 

Deliverv of water to the distribution system began March 6. The 
total discharge from the reservoir to Jime 30 was 27,510 acre-feet. 
Delivery of water to the Maxwell Canal began March 1. The total 
diversions to Jime 30 were 11,750 acre-feet. The irrigable area of 
holdings on that portion of the project east of the Umatilla River is 
estimated to be 12,000 acres ana the area actually irrigated approxi- 
mately 8,500 acres. 

West extension, — Diversions of water by the west extension main 
canal were continuous throughout the year. The irrigation season 
of 1918 ended November 1. The irrigation season of 1919 began; 
April 1. Diversions between the irrigation seasons were for sluicmg: 
operations. Approximately 10,000 acre-feet were diverted for irriga- 
tion purposes to June 30. About 2,000 acres have been irrigated. 
Sluicmg operations in the main canal resulted in ample canal capacity 
for irrigation purposes. 

Historical review , Umatilla project. 



Item. 



Acreage for which senice was prepared to 

supply water 

Miles ol^canal operated 

Acreage irrigated 

Water diverted (acre-feet) 

Water delivered to land (acre-feet) 

Per acre of land irrigated (acre-feet) 



1914 


1915 


17,587 


16,000 


112 


112 1 


5,100 


5,300 


50,900 


86,200 


36^300 


29,650 


5.57 



1916 


1917 


1918 


19,000 


24,247 


24,658 


163 


165 


177 


5,900 


7,327 


9,100 


93,000 


99,900 


118, 154 


34,380 


45,365 


48,163 
6.61 


5.83 


6.19 



19191 



124,658 

180.2 

10,500 

162,850 

53,500 

5.1 



1 Estimated. 
gUTTIiEMBNT . 



The population of the project in 1918 was 2,400, about half living 
on farms, the other hali in the four project towns of Hermiston^ 
Umatilla, Irrigon, and Boardman. 

Settlement data, Umatilla project. 



Item. 



1916 



Total number of farms on project > 745 

Population ' 975 

Number of irrigated farms 364 

Operated by owners or managers i 216 

Operated by tenants 148 

Population I 975 

Number of towns ; 4 

Population 1,225 

Population in towns and on farms ! 2, 200 

Number of schools (public) | 6 

Number of churches 9 

Number of banks 1 

Total capital stock I $25,000 

A mount of deposits j 199, 000 

Number of depositors I 845 

I 



1917 



«800 

1,024 

411 

302 

109 

1,024 

1,100 

2,124 

6 

9 

1 

125,000 

$157,000 

960 



1918 



<869 

1,127 

459 

339 

120 

1,200 

1,200 

2,327 

6 



$25,000 

$170,000 

1,000 



1919 » 



.«876. 

1,200 
500 
350 
IMV 

l,20a 
4 

1,400 

2,60» 


1 

$25,00a 

$232,000 

I,12» 



1 Estimated. 



• Number of water-right applications and rental contracts. 



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OREGON, UMATILLA PROJECT. 



285 



PBINCrPAL CROPS. 

During 1918 approximately 9,100 acres were irrigated and 6,819 
acres cropped, the difference being mainly areas m new seedings 
of alfalfa. The total value of the crops was $400,640 as compared 
with $311,400 during 1917. Continued war prices created an abnor- 
mal crop value. Tne year was favorable for alfalfa but the fruit 
crop was practically a failiu-e. 

The agricultural situation for 1919 is on the whole excellent. 

There wiS be some fruit losses, but all other crops are in flourishing 

cpndition. 

Crop report^ UmalUla project^ Oregon^ 1918. 



Crop. 



Alfalfa 

Alfalfa seed 

Apples 

-Canesirap 

Barley 

Oorn, Indian 

Oom, sorghum 

■Com, fodder 

Fn^, small 

Garden 

Hay 

Oats 

Peaches 

Pears 

Pasture 

Potatoes 

Pnmes 

Rye 

Vetch seed 

Wheat 

Miscellaneous 

Less duplicated areas — 
Total cropped acreage. 



Irrigated, no crop: 

Nanbearing orchard 
: alfalfa 



Young alfal 
Ground, fall plowed . 

ICiscellaneous 

Less duplicated areas 



Totallrrigated acreage 



Yields. 



Values. 



Unit of 
yield. 



Ton 

Bushel — 
Pounds... 
Gallon.... 
Bushel — 

...do 

...do.. 

Ton 



' Ton.... 

I Bushel. 

Pound. 

...do.... 



Bushel — 
Pound — 

I Bushel... 

I. ..do 

i...do 



Total. 



19,063 
591 
103,800 
523 
655 
6,403 
145 
778 



407 
16 



23,426 



3,296 
6,000 

175 
63 

449 



Average . Per unit 
per acre. , of yield. 



3.6 


$17.84 


5.1 


10.75 


(0 


.0320 


74.7 


1.46 


11.6 


L36 


25.4 


1.53 


36.2 


1.38 


6.8 


7.02 



1.1 

16 

0) 
3,904 



65.2 



5.3 
2.7 
14.6 



8.94 
1.00 



1.334 
.05 
2.15 
13.00 
2.22 



Total and average. 



Total. 



$340,083 

6,363 

3,322 

764 

755 

9,796 

200 

5,462 

3,140 

6,524 

3,630 

16 

1,135 

890 

10,003 

4,397 

300 

376 

819 

997 

1,671 



400,642 



Per acre. 



$64.48 

54.30 

7.96 

109. M 
15.73 
38.87 
50.00 
47.91 
55.09 
98.85 
9.89 
16.00 
10.32 

148.33 
12.92 
89.73 

160,00 
11.40 
36.17 
32.16 
47.74 



68.76 



Areas. 



I- 



I Irrigable area farms reported 

Irrigated area farms reported 

{ Miscellaneous 

Under water ri ght applications . 
I Under rental contracts 

Cropped area (arms reported 



Acres. 



16,110 
9,100 

s 1,298 

7,305 

502 

6,819 



I 



Farms. 



450 
459 

90 
344 

32 



Per cent 

of project 

of 26,300 

acres. 



67.5 
34.6 

4.9 
27.8 

L9 
26.9 



> Crop failure. 

< ICaxwell rental contract lands, 199 acres; vested water right, 63 acres; Maxwell water right, 289 acres; 
•departmental regulations, 37 acres; sandy area, 706 acres; 7 farms duplicated. 

PUBLIC NOTICES AND OBDERS. 
PUBLIC NOTICE, JULY 16, 1918. 

1. In pursuance of section 4 of the reclamation act of June 17, 
1902 (32 Stat., 388), and acts amendatory thereof or supplementary 
thereto, particularly the reclamation extension act of August 13, 
1914 (38 Stat., 686), public notice is given, that upon proper appli- 
-cation being made therefor, water will be furnished under the 



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286 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICB. 

Umatilla project, Qregony in the irrigation season of 1918 and there- 
after, for the irrigable lands of the SE. i SE. i of sec. 35, T. 5 N., 
R. 26 E., W. M., subject to terms and conditions of the public notice 
issued for the third unit of the west extension of said project, Feb- 
ruary 7, 1918. 

S. G. Hopkins, 
Assistant Secretary of the Interior, 

PUBLIC NOTICE, NOVEMBER 26, 1918. 

1. Supplemental constmction — Chaii^ in character of works.-^ 
Under the provisions of the reclamation act of Jime 17, 1902 (3*2 
Stat., 388), and acts amendatory thereof or supplementary thereto^, 
particularlv section 4 of the reclamation extension act of August 
13, 1914 (38 Stat., 686), a majority of the water right apnlicants 
and owners of the lands included in district No. 22 of the Umatilla 
project, Oregon, have made agreements providing for an increase in 
the cost of construction in the sum of $20 per irrigable acre. Public 
notice ratifying said agreements was promulgated February 16, 1918. 
A majority of the water right applicants and owners of land in said 
district have since made supplemental agreements under which the 
character of the work to be done is changed and is now described 
as follows: The construction of a 20-inch cement pipe line, about 
1,750 feet long, and a dk tributary, from the outlet of said pipe,, 
extending about 900 feet. 

2. Batiflcation. — The said supplemental ajgreements are hereby 
ratified and confirmed. The public notice oi February 16, 1918, is 
hereby amended to such extent and purpose, otherwise to remain 
in full force and effect. 

E. C. Bradley, 
Assistant to the Secretary of the Interior. 

PUBLIC NOTICE, MARCH 12, 1919. 

1. Annual operation and maintenance charge. — In pursuance of 
section 4 of the reclamation act of June 17, 1902 (32 Stat., 388),. 
and of acts amendatory thereof or supplementary thereto, particularly 
the reclamation extension act of August 13, 1914 (38 Stat., 686)^ 
announcement is hereby made that the annual operation and main- 
tenance charge for the irrigation season of 1919 and thereafter imtil 
further notice against all lan(b of the Umatilla project, Oregon, under 
public notice, shall be as follows: For lands of the west extension a 
minimum charge of $2 per irrigable acre, whether water is used 
thereon or not, which minimum charge will entitle the water user 
to 3 acre-feet of water per irrigable acre, and for all other lands a 
minimum charge of $2 per irrigable acre, whether water is used 
thereon or not, which minimum charge will entitle the water user 
to 4 acre-feet of water per irrigable acre. Additional supplies will 
be furnished for all lands at the following rates: The first acre- 
foot for 50 cents, the next acre-foot for 75 cents, and each acre-foot 
thereafter for $1: Provided, That for lands seeded during the cur- 
rent irrigation season to alfalfa for the first time, the additional 
supply of water will be furnished for 25 cents per acre-foot. All 
operation and maintenance charges under the project will be due 



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OREGON, UMATILLA PBOJECT. 



287 



and payable on March 1 following the irrigation season; but where 
water ri^ht application is made lor public land entered under the 
reclamation law after June 15, or wnere water right application is 
made after August 1 for land in private ovnership, no operation 
and maintenance charge will be maae for water delivered during the 
remainder of the irrigation season in which water right application 
is made. 

S. G. Hopkins, 
Assistant Secretary of the Interior. 

PUBLIC NOTICE, MAY 24, 1919. 

1. In pursuance of section 4 of the reclamation act of June 17, 
1902 (32 Stat., 388), and acts amendatory thereof or supplementary 
thereto, and in accordance with the agreements describea in section 
3 hereof, providing for additional construction for lands having 
vested water rights from the system of the Qr^on Land & Water 
Co., and being located in the west extension of the Umatilla project, 
Oregon, pubhc notice is hereby issued as follows: 

2. Classification of lands. — ^The lands under the system of the 
Oregon Land & Water Co. have been classified according to the 
value of their vested rights and for reference purposes are designated 
herein as class A, class B, class C, and class D. 

3. Lands for which water will be furnished. — ^The necessary con- 
struction work having been performed, water will be furnished 
under said project in the irrigation season of 1919 and thereafter, 
for the irrigable lands referred to in the list which follows. The 
diflferent tracts of land covered by this notice are described in num- 
bered deeds issued by the Oegon Land & Water Co., and also in 
contracts between tne landowners and the United States. The 
list below divides these lands according to classes, gives the respec- 
tive numbers of the Oregon Land & Water Co. deeds, names of 
contracting landowners, dates of contracts, areas of lands and 
volume and page numbers of the records of the contracts in the 
county recoros of Or^on, to wit: 



LANDS IN CLASS A. 



No. 
O.L.&W. 
Co. deed 



Contracting tend owner. 



D. R.Brownell 

EUaR.Walpole.... 

Mary J. Dexter 

MarV E. McNurlen. 

Emily Doerlng 

J. S. Cabbage 

Burtis L. Jenkins... 

Melia Sargent 

Emma O. Hibbard. 
do. 



Helen H.ConkUn.... 
J. W. Brackenbury., 

T.J. George 

ElixaJ.Rider 

Peter Susbauer 

A. A. Anthony 

J. H. Smith 

J. L. Egbert 

F. H. Denson 

Nancy Jane Ricks. 
Alvah Str 
TburstOD 



;rong. . . . 
iGnm.. 



Date of 
contract. 



May 5, 
May 81, 
Oct. 4, 
May 6, 
Apr. 27, 
Apr. 17, 
Jan. 6, 
Sept. 11, 
May 6, 
do. 



I 



Area. 



I Volume 
and page 
number 
county 
record. 



1917 
1916 
1916 I 
1916 
1916 
1916 1 
1916 I 
1916 
1916 I 



Aug. 10, 
Mar. 26, 
Apr. 28, 
Apr. 21, 
Apr. 17, 
May 8, 
May 29, 

^.^dJ.!: 
^^ I; 

Apr. 17, 



1916 
1919 
1916 
1916 
1916 I 
1916 I 
1916 , 
1916 ' 



1916 
1916 
1916 



26.5 I 
10.17 I 

5.18 
6.7 1 
30.16 
10 

5 

5 
26.97 

5.17 

5 
• 6 

4.78 

7.66 

8 

8.47 

5.95 

5 

4 

4.2 

6 
12.25 



County in which 
recorded. 



99-274 


UmatiUa. 


80-179 


Morrow. 


99-56 


Umatilla. 


99-50 


Do. 


30-283 


Morrow. 


30 325 


Do. 


30-251 


Do. 


30-247 


Do. 


30-245 


Do. 


30-243 


Do. 


80-173 


Do. 


33-75 


Do. 


99-66 


Umatilla. 


30-261 


Morrow. 


30-265 


Do. 


30-329 


Do. 


30-259 


Do. 


30-161 


Do. 


80-323 


Do. 


99-45 


Umatilla. 


80-327 


Morrow. 


80-298 


Do. 



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288 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 
LANDS IN CLASS A-Contlnued. 



No. 1 
O.L.&W.I 
Co. deed. ; 



Contracting land owner. 



Date of 
contract. 



Area. 



I Volume . 
count" recoraea. 



37 
38 
39 
41 
42 
43 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
£3 
51 
55 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 
67 
70 
71 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
80 
81 
82 
83 
86 
89 
1» 
92 
93 
95 
97 
98 
102 
103 
1(H 
105 
106 
107 
108 
109 
115 
117 
118 
119 
120 
122 
123 
128 
129 
130 
131 
132 
134 
136 
138 
140 
143 
125 
148 
147 
140 
150 
153 
158 
162 
164 
170 
173 
177 
178 



T. W. Osgood 

N. Seaman 

J. E. Henkle 

Winifred B. Harper. . . 

H. H.Edwards 

R. Vernon Jones 

George Rand 

George Blume 

A.W. Beachler 

Peter Susbauer 

Let tie D. Holbrook.... 

Chas. H. Benedict 

W. T. Bray 

Grai^tS. Potter 

Florence N. Kent 

L. A. Doble 

Peter Susbauer 

Alfred Ives 

C.H.Ives 

A. E. McFarland 

J. W. Brackenbury. . . . 

Philander Bishop 

Margaret C. Broughol.. 

Frank L. Wait 

Harriet H. Wait 

S. L. C«rson 

Fred Ricks 

Charles W.Caklwell... 

L.M.Davis 

Charles P. Cahoon 

P. E. Lynne 

W.S.flimt 

Lucius A . Doble 

T. A. Crank 

J. W. Brackenbru7 

Jennie B. Corey 

George Susbauer 

A. H. Johnson 

A.H.Allen 

W.S. Hunt 

B. Farrell 

Walter Blackburn 

W. R. Walpole 

H.H.Edwards 

J. M. McCaw 

O. O. Davis 

Philander Bishop 

C. Alexander McC«be. . 
EllaR. Walpole 

do 

Elmer Bro\vn 

D.W.Price 

George Rand 

J. A. Yeomans 

W. A. Walpole 

F.M.Pike 

H.H.Edwards 

J. H.Smith 

L.M. Davis 

Clyde E.Niles 

W^M.Riggs 

R. P. Pike 

D. Schamhorst 

D. R. Brownell 

Lester W. Lancaster... 

George Rand 

D. Schamhorst 

W.R. Walpole 

J.W.Walker 

A.H.Allen 

Nancy Jane Ricks 

L. Alboucq 

Walters. Vail 

Fred Ricks 

Ella R. Walpole 

Addison Bennett 

R. P. Pike 

Mike Donnelly 

W. T. Bray 

A. £. McFarland 



Apr. 17, 1916 I 
Apr. 15, 1916 
Julv 17,1916 
Apr. 17,1916 ! 
Apr. 22,1916 

do 

Apr. 2 J, 1916 I 
Apr. 10, 1916 
May 10, 1916 
Apr. 17,1916 ' 
Aug. 21,1916 
May 9,1916 I 
30,1919 I 
1, 1916 ; 
15, 1916 
3,1916 
17,1916 ' 
15, 1916 ' 



Jan. 

Sept. 

May 

July 

Apr. 

Biay 



do.. 



Apr. 29, 1916 
Mar. 25,1919 , 
Apr. 22,1916 \ 
Apr. 29, 1916 
May 15,1916 ' 

do 

May 19,1916 ' 
Apr. 20,1916 " 
Apr. 17,1916 : 
Mar. 4,1919 I 
Feb. 25,1916 
June 20,1916 \ 
May 12,1916 
July 3, 1916 I 
Apr. 22,1916 
Mar. 25,1919 
Apr. 20,1916 
Aug. 30, 1916 , 
Apr. 26,1916 I 
Feb. 15,1919 
May 12, 1916 I 
Julv 15,1916 I 
May 11,1916 ' 
May 31,1916 
Apr. 22,1916 
Oct. 6, 1916 
June 5, 1916 
Oct. 1, 1918 
Sept. 29,1916 ! 
May 31,1916 

do ; 

June 24,1916 
May 12,1916 
Apr. 21,1916 

do 

May 31,1916 
May 4, 1916 
Apr. 22,1916 
Apr. 29,1916 
4,1919 
11,1916 
5, 1916 
4, 1916 
Nov. 18,1916 
Apr. 21,1916 
May 20,1916 
Apr. 24,1916 
Nov. 18,1916 
May 31,1916 
Apr. 25,1917 
Feb. 15,1919 
9, 1916 
7, 1919 
2, 1916 
_-^. 20,1916 
May 31,1916 
Feb. 10,1919 
May 4, 1916 
Feb. 10,1919 
Jan. 30,1919 
Apr. 29,1916 



Mar. 

July 
, May 
' May 



May 
Feb. 
Oct. 
Apr. 



6.53 


30-289 


5 


30 301 


7.17 


30-165 


5 


30-269 


3.06 


99-72 


15.54 


30-2P3 


10 


30-2SI 


5 


30 331 


5 


30-177 


6.65 


30-297 


8.44 


30-211 


5.15 


30-239 


4.58 


33-f3 


12 03 


30-235 


9.45 


30-233 


5 


30-229 


18.22 


80-295 ^ 


5 


30-167 


5.13 


30-231 


12.29 


99-121 


5 


33-81 


5.09 


30-315 


5 


30-319 


7.06 


30-221 


5 


30-223 


6.12 


80-217 


15.09 


30-267 


16.38 


30-277 


5 


33-71 


10.27 


30-339 


10.00 


30-219 


5.27 


30-215 


10.09 


30-171 


5 


30-255 


5 


33-77 


16.29 


30-307 


4.87 


30-213 


10 


80-305 


7.20 


33-65 


5 


30-211 


5 


30-209 


5 


30-169 


5 


30-207 


3.2 


99-132 


10 


30-263 


10 


30-181 


6.05 


31-453 


5 


30-541 


5 


30-205 


5 


30-203 


5 


99-39 


4.98 


30-201 


8 


30-271 


5 


30-285 


5 


30-199 


5 


99-110 


7.74 


99-94 


10 


80-273 


6 


33-85 


7.64 


30-193 


5.14 


30-291 


6 


90-104 


5.84 


30 3i3 


4.36 


99-77 


8.26 


30-191 


5 


30-279 


5 


30-345 


5 


30-195 


5 


30-517 


6.98 


33-50 


4.18 


99-28 


2.5 


33-83 


4 


99-23 


5.05 


30-313 


5. 


99-17 


5 


33-79 


5 


99-88 


5 


33-61 


4.75 


33-57 


5 


99-99 



Morrow. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Umatilla. 
Morrow. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
UmaUlla. 
Morrow. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Umatilla. 
Morrow. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Umatilla. 
Morrow. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Umatilla. 

Do. 
Morrow. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
UmaUlla. 
Morrow. 
Umatilla. 
Morrow. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
UmatlUa. 
Morrow. 
Umatilla. 
Morrow. 
Umatilla. 
Morrow. 
Umatilla. 
Morrow. 

Do. 
Umatilla. 



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OREGON, UMATILLA PROJECT. 

LANDS IN CLASS B. 



289 



No. 
O.L.4W. 
Co. deed. 


CoBtmcting iand owner. 


Date of 
contract. 


Area, 


Volume 
and page 
number 
county 
record. 


County in whfdh 
recorded. 


168 


H.H.Edwards 


Apr. 22,1016 


16.2 


09-83 i TTnuktillA. 











LANDS IN CLASS C. 



Apr. 10,1016 
May 31,1016 
Apr. 10,1016 
May 1, 1016 
May 31,1016 
Apr. 20,1016 
Nov. 11,1916 
May 20,1016 
May 31,1016 
An * 

>io 

>10 
>16 
>16 
116 
116 
116 
>16 
116 
116 
116 
116 
16 
116 



Jan, 
Mar 
Mas 
Maj 
Apr 
Ma5 
Jul5 
Jnn< 
Apr 
Ma> 
Apr 
Apr 
Ma^ 
Feb 



5 


30-308 


5 


30-249 


6 


30-299 





30-321 


5.06 


30-237 


6 


00-126 


9.08 




5.27 


30-227 


5.13 


30-335 


5 


30-107 


5.07 


33-« 


5.14 


33-67 


5.06 


30-180 


5.68 


30-387 


5.13 


30-163 


5.14 


30-185 


4.15 


00-12 


4.15 


00-6 


5 


30-275 


5 


30-183 


5.86 


30-311 


4.41 


30-287 


10.75 


30-257 


1L84 


30-176 



Morrow. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Un»UUa. 
Morrow. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 
Umatilla. 

Do. 
Morrow. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 

Do. 



LANDS IN CLASS D. 



163 Kitty Alice M«01I1. 



Apr. 17,1016 



2.04 



30-341 Morrow. 



4. Classes of charges for water rights. — The water-right charges are 
of two kinds, to wiv- (1) A charge against each irrigable acre to cover 
cost of additional donstruction for the irrigation system, termed the 
additional construction charge; and (2) an annual charge against 
each irrigable acre ^o cover cost of operation and maintenance of the 
system, termed the operation and maintenance charge. 

5. Additional comftruction charge. — For lands covered by the above- 
described contracts the additional construction charge shall be as 
follows: For lands in class A, $14 per inigable acre; for lands in 
class B, $15.65 per Irrigable acre; for lands in class C, $20 per irrigable 
acre; for lands in class D, $33.10 per irrigable acre. Said charges in 
each case shall be paid in 10 equal annual instalments, the first of 
which shall be duo and payable December 1, 1919, and subsequent 
instalments, on December 1 of each year thereafter. 

6. Advance payment of additional construction charge permis- 
sible. — Any water contractor may, at his option, pay in advance the 
whole or any part of the additional construction charge owing by him 
within any shorter period than that prescribed by this notice. 

7. Op^ation and maintenance charge. — The operation and mainte- 
nance charge for the irrigation season of 1919 and thereafter until 
further notice shall be the same per acre of irrigable land whether 



138554—19- 



-19 



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290 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

water is used thereon or not, as announced for the other lands under 
the west extension of the Umatilla project in public notice of March 
12, 1919. 

8. Place and method of payment of water-right charges. — ^All water- 
right charges must be paid at the office of the United States Reclama- 
tion Service at Hermiston, Oreg., in cash or by New York draft, 
or money order, payable to special fiscal agent, United States Recla- 
mation Service. 

John W. Hallowell, 
Assistant to the Secretary of the Interior. 

PUBLIC NOTICE, JUNE 27, 1919. 

1. Lands for which water will be f mulshed* — ^Upon proper applica- 
tion being made therefor, water will be furnished under the Umatilla 
project, Oregon, in the irrigation season of 1919, and thereafter, for 
the irrigable lands described as follows, to wit: 

Commencing at comer to sees. 16, 17, 20, and 21, Tp. 4 N., R. 28 
E., W. M., thence due west 245 feet to point of beginning of this 
description; thence north 67H fe©t to east bank of Umatilla River; 
thence downstream along east bank of Umatilla River as follows: 
South 55 degrees 00 minutes east 299 feet; thence south 41 degrees 
40 minutes east 271 feet, thence south 60 degrees 33 minutes east 482 
feet, thence south 76 degrees 34 minutes east 257 feet to a noint 
where section line between sections 16 and 21 intersect the east Dank 
of the Umatilla River; thence south 1,320 feet; thence west 1,095 feet; 
thence north 1,320 feet to place of berinning of this description, 
shown on a farm unit plat of T. 4 N., K. 28 E.j W. M., approved 
February 11, 1911, and amended April 8, 1918, which plat is on file 
in the office of the project manager. United States Reclamation 
Service, Hermiston, Oreg., and the local land office at The Dalles, 
Oreg. 

2. Limit of area for which water right may be secured. — The maxi- 
mum limit of area for which water-right application may be made for 
lands in private ownership shall be 160 acres of irrigable land for 
each landowner. 

3. Application for water right. — Water-right appliication must be 
made to the project manager, United States Reclamation Service, 
Hermiston, Oreg., upon a form provided for that purpose, and may 
be made on and after the date of this notice. 

4. Glasses of charges for water rights. — The water-right charges 
are of two kinds, to wit: (a) A charge against each irrigable acre to 
covercostof construction of the irrigation system; and (o) an annual 
charge against each irrigable acre to cover cost of operation and 
maintenance of the system. 

5. Constructiott charge. — The construction charge shall be $70 per 
acre of irrigable land, paj^able as follows: An imtial payment of 5 
per cent of the construction charge shall be made at the time of 
filing water-right application, and the remainder of the construction 
charge shall be paid in 15 annual instalments, the first 5 of which 
shall each be 5 per cent and the remainder each 7 per cent of the 
total construction charge. The first of said 15 annual instalments 



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OBEGON, UMATILLA. PROJECT. 291 

shall become due and payable December 1 of the fifth calendar year 
after the initial instalment, and subsequent instalments shall become 
due and payable on December 1 of each calendar year thereafter. 

6. Increased construction cliarge in certain cases. — If water-right 
application is not to be made within one year from the date of this 
notice the construction charge will be increased 5 per cent each year 
until such application is made and an initial instalment is paid. 

7. Advance payment of constrnction charge permissible. — The water- 
right applicant may, at his option, pay in advance the whole or any 
part 01 the construction charge owing by him within any shorter 
period than that prescribed by this notice. 

8. Operation and maintenance charges. — The operation and main- 
tenance charge for the irrigation season of 1919 and thereafter will 
be the same as for other like lands under the project, and will be due 
and payable on March 1 following the irrigation season. 

9. Place and method of payment of water-right charges. — ^All water- 
right charges must be paid at the office of the United States Reclama- 
tion Service at Hemuston, Oreg., in cash, or by New York draft, 
or money order, payable to the special fiscal agent. United States 
Reclamation Service. 

John W. Hallowbll, 
AssiMarU to the Secretary of the Interior. 

FINANOLAL STATEMENT. 

Condensed balance sheet, Umatilla project, June SO, 1919, 

Cash $321.28 

Inventory of materials and supplies on hand 13,273.32 

Accounts receivable: 

Current accounts receivable $36,512.44 

Construction water-right charges, unaccrued 1;248,631.21 

1,286,143.M 

Construction work contracted 127. 7S 

Gross construction cost 2, 473, 191. 46 

Less construction revenue earnings 33,459.36 

Net ooostmetion cost 2,439,732: IG 

Gross operation and maintenance cost 387,113.31 

Less operation and maintenance earnings 29, 454. 17 

— ^^'<^'^ 

Accounts payab!e 4, 041. 78 

Contingent obligations 449.01 

Collections and contrasts of speoiflo amounts for repayments to reclamation fond 1,796,59L47 

Capital investment: 

Disbursement, transfer and joint construction vouchers received 8, 029, 796. 20 

Collection, transfer, refund, and Joint construction vouchers issued 733, 620. 24 

:'et in vestment 2,296,174.96 



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292 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL, REPORT OF RECLAMATION SBRYICE. 

Feature coits of Umatilla project. 



Principal feature. 


n~>/~ 


Total to June 
80, 1019. 


Examination and surveys: 

Fastsid^ 


|7,95L56 


$58,085.35 
G4,47B.n 


West sice 








.. ^,951.68 


128,102:00 


Storage works, >easl side: 

DlTersion dam and works 




88,284.92 


Feeicanal 




341,410.50 


Cold Sfirings dam and works 




464,044.11 










839,339.59 








Canal system: 

(^anal A , east side 




45,477.86 
4,509.04 


Maxwell Diversion dam and works, east side 




Maxwell Canal, east si^'e 




37,084.83 


Three Mile Falls fJlversIon dam and works, west side 




73,580.05 


Main fanal, v^^t si^e 




487,423.31 


Oregon Land and Water Co. system, west side 


78,804.00 


78,304.00 








78,354.00 


727,105.08 


Lateral system: 

East side supplemental construction 


9,559.57 
4.55 

0,539.25 


50,918.28 


T'ast si'^e laterals. 


428,981.50 


West side .aleraJs 


191, 238. 01 








10,008.37 


071,108.44 


Drainage system: 

Hermiston dnUn , , . 




44.0ia09 


Second unit drain r .,..., r r . < 




3, 174. 00 


Hat Rock drain 




1,004.05 


TTmatillfi drAln 




0,022.09 












54,812.88 








Farm units: 

Fast side 


17.72 
04 80 


1,890.00 


West fide 


1,337.77 








83.58 


3,283.77 


Permanent improvements: 

Frame buildings, Hermiston, east side 


»«50.00 


8,400.12 


' 'ew office builT)ing, Hermiston, east aide 


0,454.70 


Feed canal Quarters, east side 




3,019.90 


Cold Springs dam bnildines, east side 




mf7 


Demonstration farm buUnlngs, east side. 




Warehouse, Irrieon, west side 




, M7;81 


fl«wdinan (tuarterS', we^side 


' 7».30 
8,414.80 


3,528.82 


Three Mile Falls quarters, weet side 


8,414.50 








4, on. 70 


82,821.17 


Telephone system, west side 


101.70 


2,772.57 








100,301.12 
1^486.85 


2,454,355.31 


Operation and maintenance added to construction 


18,830.15 






Gross construction cost to June 30, 1919 


100.201.12 


2,473,191.40 






Leas revenues earned during construction period: 
Rental of buildings .. . ... 




709.00 


Rental of grazing and farm lands .. . 




22, 129. 40 


Rental of irrigation water 




saoo 


Contractors freight refunds 




1.055.31 


Other revenues, unclassified 




10.288.07 


Loss on hospital operations 


103.80 


1862.48 








103.80 


33,4fi0.30 


Net oonatructlon cost to June 30, 1919 


100,037.32 


2,439,732.10 







> Deduct. 



* Sale of buildings, no cost during fiscal year. 



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0BB60N, UMATHIA pbojbct. 
StaUment of cost by calendar yearSf Umatilla project. 



293 





Construction. 


Operation and 

maintenance 

under pubic 

notice. 


Total cost. 


Year ended Dec. »: 

. 190'? 


342,724.04 

110,049.68 

81,567.21 

134, 764. 17 

93,190.64 

71,021.46 

314,071.70 

319,020.11 

187,486.62 

60,286.14 

31,520.59 

90,477.67 




$628, 021. 4S 
364,258.01 


19C»////.....'. '.,.'...... 


S2i,533.97 
27,209.09 
30,724.15 
30,538.32 
27,140.45 
32,737.93 
26,334 68 
5,380.47 
28,409.55 
42,372.43 
71,817.60 
35,308.98 


1900 . ' 


137,268.77 


1910 


112,281.36- 


1911 


165, 302. 49 


1912 


120,331.09 


1913 


103,759.30 


1914 


340,406.38 


1915 


324.400.68 


1916 


21.'>,896.17 


1917 


111,658.67 


1918 . 


103,338.09 


Jan. 1 to June 30, 1919 


125,786.65 






Subtotal 


2,473,191.46 


379,607.52 
7,605.79 


3,852,098.98 


Balance In nlant aoooimts 


7,605.79 








Total 


2,473,191.46 


387,113.31 


2, 860, 304. 77 







Statement of cost, by fiscal yearSj Umatilla project. 





Construction. 


Operation «mk! 

maintenance 

under public 

notice. 


Total cost. 


Year ended June 30— 

1908 


$882,041.86 
128,965.20 
116,039.24 
105,634.29 
113,636.13 
88,061.26 
102,389.31 
382,946.65 
248.062.23 


$8,603.96 
26,484.38 
25,546.65 
33,564.23 
28,444.26 
29,822.46 
30,981.80 
6,493.40 
23,719.14 
36,660.67 
51,216.61 
78,090.24 


$890,636.84 


1909 


156,449.58 


1910 


142,685.79 


1911 


139, 188. 52 


1912 


142,080.39 


1913 


117,883.72 


1914 


133,371.11 


1915 


389,440.06 


1916 


271,781.37 


1917 


171,677.45 


207,238.02 


1918 


27,636.72 
106,201.12 


78, 763. 23 


1919 


184,291.36 






Subtotal 


2,473,191.46 


379,607.62 
7,606.79 


2,862,698.98 
7,606.79 


Balance in plant accounts. , 






Total 


2,473,191.46 


387,113.31 


2,860.304.77 







Estimated cost of contemplated tvorkj Umatilla project, during fiscal year 1920. 



Features. 



Examination and sonreys 

Canal system: Impnrrement of Canal A 

Lateral system: 

East side, sitpplemental construction 

West side, coostmctioo of laterals to vested water-right lands . 

Farm units 

Permanent improvements 

Operation and maintenance under public notice 

Reimbursable aoooimts 



Total.. 



Sub- 
feature. 



Principal 
feature. 



$12,000 
3, SCO 



$500 

25,000 



16,800 

600 

1,600 

47,000 
700 



91,000 



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294 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OP RECLAMATION SERVICE. 
Operating cost and revenues, UmaiiUa project, to Dec. SI, 1918. 





Calendar year 1918. 


To end of calendar year 1918. 


Features. 


Operation. 


Mainte- 
nance. 


Total. 


Operation 


Mainte- 
nance. 


Total. 


COST. 

Storage works 


$4,546.87 
2,345.61 


•1 0^7 AA 


»a At A oi 


155,297.24 
6,218.04 


$45,332.25 
9,483.58 


$100,629.40 
15,70L62 


Canal jfyRtem . . 


3,182.51 1 5,528.12 


^ - 


Lateral system: 

East side 


4,712.11 
2,332.60 


13,484.31 
4,319.19 


18,196.42 
6,651.78 


54,079.42 
4,363.57 


126,671.37 
7,646.39 


180, 76a 79 
12,009.90 


West side 






7,044.70 


17,803.50 124,848.20 


58,442,99 


134,317.76 


192, 76a 75 


Drainage, east side 




603.61 ' <vn M 




8,662.22 
18,271.75 

12,274.95 
4,060.40 


8 662.23 


Sluicing, west side 




18,271.75 

9,251.56 
811.40 


18,271.75 

15,238.71 
ftii in 




18;?7L75 

23,342.91 
4,.06a4O 


Undistributed expenses, hydrom- 
expenses 


5,987.15 


11,067.96 


Permanent improvements 











Subtotal 




131,026.23 


232,392.91 


363,419.14 
19 22a 60 


nanoe charges added to construc- 
tion : 






U0L40 















Total 






71,817.50 

31,763.11 

«599.72 

6a 70 

1,107.98 

675. .10 
4,361.61 

525.06 
« 547. 52 






344 198.54 


BEVENUES. 

Operation and maintenance charges 
accrued on contracts with water- 
right applicants 










155,883.36 
1,79a 88 
1,74L47 


Operation and maintenance charges 
paid in advance by water-right 
applicants 






. 




Operation and mahitonance charges 
paid and forfeited by water-right 
applicants 










Penalties on operation and mainte- 
nance charges accrued on contracts 
with water-right applicants 


1 






2,823.00 

6,074.76 
19, 73a 89 - 


Rental of land and buildings during 
operating period 


. . i 






Rentals of Irrigation water 








Other revenues unclassified, earned 
during operating period 


1 






2,073.63 
s 1,052. 18 


Less discount allowed on operation 
and maintenance charges accrued 
on contracts with water-right 
applictint-'*. 
















Total 




37,236.74 
34, 68a 76 






188,066.76 
166,132.79 


Difference (deficit) 


1 








1 







lAdd. 



« Deduct. 



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OBEGOV-GAUFOBinA, KLAMATH PBOJECT. 

Herbert D. Newell, project manager, Klamath F^lls, Oreg. 
LOCATION. 

Counties: Klamath, Greg.; Siskiyon and Modoc, Oalif. 

Townships: 38 to 41 S., Rs. 8 to 14 E., Willamette meridian; 46 to 48 N., Rs. 1 
to 8 E., Mount Diablo meridian. 

Railroad: California Northeastern, Klamath Falls Municipal Railway. 

Railroad stations and estimated population June 30, 1919: Klamatli Falls, 5,500; 
Midland, 50; and Olene, Greg., 50. 

WATER SXTFPLT. 

Source of water supply: Upper Klamath Lake, Lost River, and Clear Lake. 

Area of drainas:e basin: 3,700 square miles. 

Annual run-off in acre-feet, 1904 to 1918: Link River at Klamath Falls (3,110, square 
milesV-Maximum, 2,144,200; minimum, 1,216,000; mean, 1,642,000. Lost River 
and Willow Creek at Clear Lake, Calif.— Maximum, 252,000; minimum, 34,700; mean, 
135,000. Lost River at Olene, Oreg.— Maximum, 473,500; minimum, 128,000; mean, 
263,000. 

AGBIOULTTTBAL AND CLIICATIC CONDITIONS. 

Area for which the service is prepared to supply water, season of 1919, 50,000 acres. 

Area under water-right applications, season of 1919, 42,673 acres. 

Area under special contract, season of 1919, 6,000 acres. 

Length of irrigation season: From April 15 to September 30 — 168 days. 

Average elevation of irrigable area: 4,100 feet above sea level. 
' Avera^ annual rainfall on irrigable area, 11 years: 13.4 inches. 

Range of temperature on irrigable lands: — 10° to 100° F. 

Cbamcter of soil of irrigable area: Disintegrated basalt, volcanic ash, and diatoma- 
ceous earth, being largely classified as Yakima sandy loam. 

Principal products: Alfalfa, hay, grain, and vegetables; stock, poultry, and dairy 
- products. 

Principal markets: Portland, Or^.; Sacramento and San Francisco, Calif. 

LANDS OPENED FOR IBBIGATION. 

Dates of public notices and orders: November 18 and December 7, 3908; August 24, 
1909; June 9, 1910; March 23, and September 24, 1914; March 26 and September 15, 
1915; March 9 and 16, 1916; Februarv 12, March 9 and 31, 1917; March 13, 1918. 

Location of lands opened: T. 38 3., R. 9 E.; 39 S., Rs. 8 to Hi E.; 40 S., Rs. 9 to 
11 E.; 41 S., Rs. 10 to 12 E., Willamette meridian, and 48 N., R. 5 E., Mount Diablo 
' meridian. 

Limit of area of farm units: 160 acres. 

Dutv of water, 1.8 acre-feet per acre per annum at the farm. 

Building charge pner acre of irrigable land, $30 for the first and second units, $39 and 
$45 for the third unit. 

Annual operation and maintenance charge, season of 1919, minimum charge $1.25 
per acre for 2 acre-feet, 40 cents for first additional acre-foot, and 60 cents p» acre-foot 
thereafter. 

OHBONOLOGICAL SX7KMABY. 

ReconnoiFsance made in October and November, 1903. 

Preliminary sm^eys begun in 1904. 

Construction recommended by a board of engineers May 1, 1905. 

Construction authorized by Secretary May 15, 1905. 

Main canal completed August, 1907. 

First irrigation by Reclamation Service season of 1907. 

Keno Canal completed October, 1908. 

South Branch Canal completed March, 1909. 

Clear Lake Dam completed January, 1910. 

Lost River Diversion Dam completed June, 1912. 

295 



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296 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICB. 

Adams Canal enlargement begun October, 1913, completed April, 1914. 
Second unit lateral system begun October, 1912, completed June, 1915. 
G Canal (enlargement of Griffith Lateral), begun Marcn 8, 1915, completed April, 30, 
1915. 
Lateral, margin of Tule Lake, begun June 5, 1916, completed June 30, 1917. 
Entire project 76 per cent completed June 30, 1919. 

niBIOATION PLAN. 

The irrigation plan of the Klamath project provides for storage of water in the natural 
reservoir of Upper Klamath Lake, lying just north of Klamath Falls, Oreg., an^ in the 
Clear Lake Reservoir, Calif., at the head of Lost River and 6 miles east of Tule Lake. 
Water for irrigation is diverted from the east side of Link River the outlet of Upper 
Klamath Lake, 700 feet from the lake, into the Main (A) Canal, which extends 9 miles 
in a southeasterly direction, supplying canals and laterals in the first unit of the proj- 
ect, and a portion of the second unit in Poe Valley and on Nuss Lateral. The water 
diverted from Lost River into the Griffith (G) Caiud at the Lost River Dam. 10 miles 
southeast from Klamath Falls, Oreg., supplies the lands under that canal in tne second 
unit and also the Adams Canal, which covers the portion of the first unit east of Lost 
River, the lands on the margin of Tule Lake in private ownership, and a portion of the 
bed of Tule Lake in public ownership. 

The United States claims all waste, seepage, unappropriated spring and percolating 
water arising within the project, and proposes to use such water in connection there- 
with. 

Clear Lake Dam and dikes were built mainly to withhold the waters of Lost River 
from Tule Lake, into which that river empties. The water stored in the Clear Lake 
Reservoir will be released into Lost River whenever needed for irrigation. Tule Lake 
has no visible outlet, and it is proposed to reclaim about 30,000 acres of the lake bed 
by evaporation. To assist in this, the Lost River Diversion Dam and channel (8 miles 
long) were built to divert the flood waters of Lost River into Klamath River. . 

The present irrigation system consists of 232.4 miles of canals and laterals, 83.9 miles 
of open drains, and 8 miles of closed drains. These works cover 29,281 acres of irri- 
gable land in the first unit, 7,459 acres of irrigable land in the second unit, and 5,933 
acres of irrigable land in the third unit; also about 1,327 acres of inij^le land in public 
ownership in the former bed of Tule Lake, not yet under public notice, and 6,000 acres 
of district land under special contract, a total irrigable area of 50,000 acres. 

As the reclamation of the bed of Tule Lake progresses a second diversion dam will 
be built in Lost River about 15 miles nearly south from the first dam. This will divert 
water east and west on the reclaimed area of the lake bed. 

A canal known as the Keno Power Canal was built on the west bank of Link River 
in Klamath Falls, Oreg., diverting water from the river 1,200 feet from its outlet from 
Upper Klamath Lake. This canal, primarily designed for power puiposes, was also 
planned to furnish water for irrigating lands on the west side of Klamath River, south- 
west from Klamath Falls, Oreg. No power plant, however, has been installed by the 
Government, as all irrigation at pre^nt is by gravity flow. This power canal has 
been leased to the California-Oregon Power Co. for 10 years with privilege of renewal, 
at a rental of $1,000 per annum and the further consideration of rates for power for 
pumping for irrigation within the project of 0.7 cents per kilowatt hour for units of 106 
horsepower or over. 

An undeveloped power site is located at the drop from the Main (A) Canal into the 
South Branch (C) Cfanal, 9 miles southeast from Klamath Falls, Oreg. 

The principal features of the project are the Clear Lake Reservoir, the Lost River 
diversion works, the Keno Power Canal, the Main Canal Tunnel, 3,300 feet long, and 
the main canals of the distributing system. 

SXTMMABY OF GEMEBAL DATA FOB KLAMATH PROJECT TO END 
OF FISCAL YEAR 1010. 

Areas: 

Irrigable acreage when project is complete 141, 444 

Public land entered to June 30, 1919 2, 691 

Public land open to entry on June 30, 1919 59 

Public land withdrawn on June 30, 1919 27, 300 

Private land June 30, 1919 Ill, 394 

Acreage service could have supplied in season of 1918 60, 000 

Estimated acreage service can supply in season 1919 50, 000 

Estimated acreage service can supply in season 1920 57, 000 

Acreage irrigated season of 1918 33, 268 

Acreage cropped under irrigation season of 1918 32, 127 



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OBBQON-CALIFORNIA, KLAMATH PROJECT. 297 

Crops: 

Value of irrigated crops season of 1918 $929, 131. 00 

Value of irrigated crops per acre crq>ped $28. 92 

Finances: 

Net construction cost to June 30, 1919 $3,031,341. 19 

Per cent completed on June 30, 1919 76 

Appropriated for fiscal year 1920 $367, 000. 00 

Estimated per cent complete by June 30, 1920 86 

Proposed appropriation for fiscal year 1921 $289, 000 

£stimate4 per cent complete by June 30, 1921 94 

Announced construction charges per acre $30, $39, $45 

Appropriation fiscal year 1919 $423, 000. 00 . 

Decrease under 10 per cent provision * 22, 200. 00 

Increase miscellaneous collections and transfers 24, 614. 03 

Increased compensation 5, 415. 65 

$430, 829. 68 

Expenditures chargeable to 1919 appropriation — 

Disbursements 107, 778. 84 

Transfers 8, 346. 17 

Current liabilities 9, 048. 94 

Contingent liabilities 388. 72 

125, 562. 67 

Unencumbered balance on July 1, 1919 305, 267. 01 

Repayments: 

Value of construction water-right contracts 1, 749, 217. 08 

Cotostrucfion charges — 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 » 395, 059. 89 

Collected to June 30, 1919 373, 610. 07 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 21,449. 82 

Operation and maintenance charges (public notice) — 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 a 267, 069. 60 

Collected to June 30, 1919 ' 246, 666. 72 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 , * 20, 402. 88 

Water rental charges — 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 38, 372. 75 

Collected to June 30, 1919 38, 372. 75 

Power charges — 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 3, 020. 00 

Collected to June 30, 1919 3, 020. 00 

Drainage: 

Estimated acreage damped by seepage to June 30, 1919 6, 200 

Miles of drains built to June 30, 1919 — 

Open 83.9 

Closed 8. 

91.9 

Estimated acreage protected by drains to June 30, 1919 23, 400 

Estimated acreage to be protected bv authoiized system 25, 600 

Cost of drainage woiks to June 30, 1919 $425, 934. 69 

COKSTBTJOTION DUBING FISCAL YEAB. 

The work done during the fiscal year consists of a small amount 
of lateral construction and the installation of minor structures. 

1 Deduct. 

* Includes supplemental construction accrued as operation and malntenaoe, $1,077.43. 
» In ato dBSB up y iflten tat-copstmetionpald^ts o p e iitl on and miUntenance, S546.53. 

* Inolades supplemental constractlon to be paid as operacic^and-tindittenaiKie unfeolAMed ,"9680.00. 



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298 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL. REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICB. 
SEEPAQE AND DBAXNAGE. 

Two drag-line machines were operated from July 1 to November 1 ; 
from the latter date to the end of the fiscal year, three machines 
were being operated except for a period of about two months during 
the winter, when all drainage work was stopped on account of cola 
weather. The drainage works constructed during the fiscal year 
consist of 12 miles of open drains, 4.7 miles of which were enlarge- 
ments of existing drains. The above work required the excavation 
of 203,580 cubic yards of material, approximately one-half of which 
reouired blasting. 

The construction of drainage works, on the first unit, was author- 
ized by public notice of September 15, 1915, which provided for an 
increase in the construction charges of $12.50 per acre. The area 
of the first unit, exclusive of vested water-right lands, is about 
27,560 acres. The works constructed and in progress will be approxi- 
mately equal to the amoimt provided for in the above pubhc notice. 
The work in progress will oe completed in about two months. 
The drains constructed and in progress will protect an area of about 
24,500 acres. After completion of the dramage works authorized, 
there will remain an area of about 2,910 acres which will have no 
drainage protection. The latter area is. fairly well. scattered over 
the project, and parts of it are threatened with damage from seepage. 

A contract has been entered into with the owners of the Ajvkeny 
tract for the construction of drainage works. The Ankeny tract 
comprises an area of 950 acres of vested water-right land which is 
included in the first unit. The service has a^eed to construct 
drainage works to the extent of $20 per acre. Work was begun on 
the Ankeny tract on June 23. 

BOABD MEETINGS. 



Date. I Subject. 

i. . 

1919. I 
Jan. 23 . Appraisal of Ankeny Canal 



Personnel. 



D. C. Henny, G. W. Offleld, R. E. 

Smith. 
D. C. Uenny, J. B. Bond, Herbert D 



Jan. 24 Charges to land irrigable by pumping from project . 

(^uials. Newell. 

Apr. 19 I Sale of Ankeny Canal, disposition of credits if sale is i Herbert D. Newell, A. H. Gulliekson. 
; made. 

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE. 

During the latter part of the season of 1918 several breaks occurred 
on project canals. All of the breaks were serious, but were quickly 
repaired, water deliveries being interrupted only a few hours. The 
run-off from the streams supplying the project was very light as com- 
pared with former years, but was sufficient for project requirements. 

In July, 1918, strong southeast winds occurred several times during 
which the water in the Upper Klamath Lake was blown away from 
the headworks of the main canal. The head in the main canal would 
be cut down until the storm subsided, usually about 12 hours. When 
the above condition prevailed Link River and the Keno Canal were 
entirely dry. 

The maintenance work consisted of the usual cleaning of canals 
and laterals. Repairs were also made to the timber-lined sections of 
the C canal. 



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OREGON-CALIFOBNIA, KT.AMATH PROJECT. 



299 



The spring of 1919 was much colder than usual, late frosts occurring 
in May and June, causing considerable damage to farm crops. Water 
was turned into the main canal on April 18 for the purpose of priming 
the canals; no water was delivered until May. During May and 
June an exceptionally heavy demand for water prevailed and all 
canals were being operated to their maximum capacity. 

On Jime 21, 1919, tiie main truss supporting the Olene flume across 
Lost River collapsed, taking with it 96 feet of flume. The work of 
replacing the flume was begun immediately and water deliveries 
were resumed on July 8. The Olene flume supplies second unit lands 
in the South Poe Valley and Nuss Lake districts, the total irrigable 
area being about 4,200 acres, of which approximately 60 per cent is 
in cultivation. With the exception of several gardens and small 
portions of a few grain fields, no damage was caused to crops by 
reason of the interruption in service. 

Historical review, Kkmiath project. 



Item. 



1914 



1915 



1916 



Aor«fiee lor which service was prepared to | i 

supply water 36,460 1 86,000 I 40,000 

Acreage irrigated i 24,400 27,254, 29,351 

Miles of canal operated 178, 187 216 

Water diverted (acre-feet) ! 56,750 1 68,830 60,010 

Water deUvered to land (acre-feet) ' 25, 610 30, 640 29, 970 

Per acre of land irrigated (acre-feet) I 1.05 1.125 1.02 



1917 



1918 



44,000 
33,635 
216 
65,368 
82,780 ' 
0.976, 



50,000 
'33,208 
210 
104,926 
52,090 
1.36 



1919 



50,000 



SBTTI^ESHENT. 

On Jime 30, 1919, only two farm units remained unentered. All 
the entrymen have improved their holdings and the greater portion 
of the entered lands are in crops. 

The demand for good farm land has been brisk and a number of 
holdings have changed hands at prices varying from $75 to $110 per 
acre. At E^amath Falls and Malin flour mills nave been erected and 
placed in operation. In general the farmers are prosperous, as good 
prices have been received for all farm products. 

In 1917 construction was begun on a railroad from Klamath Falls 
to Dairy, about 20 miles to the east. This line was projected to con- 
nect with the Oregon Short Line in the eastern part of the State. 
The road is nearing completion and the prospects seem bright for the 
early extension of this line. 

Good progress has been made in the reclamation of Tule Lake. 
Approximately 16,000 acres have been uncovered, of which 5,900 
acres have been placed in the third unit. Pending the construction 
of irrigation works for the Tule Lake lands below the third unit, the 
lands have been leased in tracts of about 80 acres for periods of one 
year. No water for irrigation has been available for the above tracts, 
except for a few which are located close to project laterals. The 
prices bid for the above tracts have ranged from 50 cents to $6 per 
acre, the higher prices usually being for the lands more recently 
imcovered. 



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300 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPOBT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 
Settlement data^ Klamath project. 



Item. 



Total number of (arms on project 

forms 

lers or managers 
ants 

us and on farms, 
hools 

ck!!!!!!!!!!!!!! 

Ills 

Number of depositors 



1914 


1915 


1916 


373 


391 


409 


1,375 


1,520 


1,580 


333 


352 


409 


290 


347 


287 


83 


105 


122 


i,iw 


l,4iB 


1,485 


4 


4 


4 


4,500 


4,700 


5,000 


5,875 


6,220 


6,580 


18 


19 


20 


9 


9 


9 


3 


3 


3 


$175,000 


$175,000 


$175,000 


31,000,000 


$1,118,500 


$1,219,846 


2,600 


3,565 


4,281 



1917 



527 

1,610 

527 

336 

191 

1,400 

4 

5,f50 

7,260 

20 

9 

3 

$175,000 

$1,300,000 

5,310 



1918 



560 
1,800 
530 
340 
190 
1,510 

6,000 

7,800 

20 

10 

4 

$225,000 

$2,383,000 

6,264 



1919 1 



570 
2,000 
540 
350 
190 
. 1,600 

6,500 

8,600 

20 

10 

4 

$225,000 

$2,500,000 

6,500 



1 Estimated. 
CHOPS. 



Alfalfa continues to be the principal crop of this project; the 
yield per acre for 1918 was somewhat below that of 1917, but the 
prices prevailing in 1918 were considerably greater than of 1917. 

During May and June, 1919, there were several periods of low 
temperature which caused considerable damage. Of the field xjrops, 
alfalfa suffered most, the greater damage usually occurring on fields 
which had not been recentlv irrigated. Most of the farmers clipped 
their alfalfa after the June irosts. Since the frosts, the weather nas 
been very dry and warm and it is probable that the alfalfa crop will 
be up to normal. 

The crop report of the Klamath project is restricted to the area 
covered by the usual crop census of the Reclamation Service, and 
does not include the Van Brimmer irrigation district and several 
pumping units which receive their water supply from project canals. 

Crop report Klamath project^ Oregon-California, year of 1918. 



Crop. 



Alfalfa 

Barley 

Fruit 

Oarden 

Hav 

Oats 

Pasture.. 

Potatoes 

Rve 

Wheat 

Sugar beets 

Total croppei acreage 



Aren 

(acres). 



Unit of 
yield. 



n,454 

3,191 

35 

165 I 

2,519 

2,53S 

8,130 

179 

449 

3,460 

7 



Ton.... 
Bushel. 



Ton.... 

Bushel. 

Acre . . . 

Bushel. 
...do... 
...do... 

Ton 



Yields. 



Total. Average 
I per acre. 



31,605 
44,413 



2.76 
13.90 



2,601 I 
46,716 



1.03 
18.40 



19,318 lOS.OO 

3,349 , 7.5 

38,317 1 11.1 

55 7.3 



Values. 



Per unit 
of yield. 



130. 
1. 



Total. 



Irrigated, no crop 

Totil Irrigate i a-sreoge. . 



32,127 I 



1,141 



Total and avera'^e. 



1632,100 

51,075 

25 

6,091 

52,020 

44,847 

40,650 

21,2.W 

5,425 

74,718 

330 



Per acre. 



$55.20 
16.00 
.72 
40.50 
20.70 
17.70 
5.00 

118.70 
12.10 
21.60 
44.00 



929. 131 



28.92 



Areas. 



Acres. 



33,268 



Total lrri<;itei area farms reported , 
Total croppe 1 are i f irms reported . . 



33,26<* 
32, 127 



Farms. 



404 
401 



Percent 

of 
project. 



Digitized by 



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OREGON-CALIFORNIA, KLAMATH PROJECT. 



301 



FIKANCLlIi STATEMENT. 

Project balance sheets Klamath project, June .W, 191S. 

Inventor of stock on hand 

Unlell'^ered orders 

Cmrents accounts: 

UnMJcnied witer 11*^1 t4?.7l4.55 

Constniction charge 1,353,079.76 

Ac'?ounts'e?€l'^ble 

OrosscMMtniGti'moost $3,0'»,lOl..'>? 

LMs66Btad|telmBnUAiilTeveniieeaniing8 60,760.33 

Net constriction cost 

Operation <mimUnten'n')e cost „ 

Less revenae earnings , 



$50.00 

28,166.33 

388.72 



S'M.aw 30 
8,139.66 



1,395,794.31 

3,031,341.19 
296,716.24 



AccooBts pavAble 

Contln-'ent obllTBti'Tis 

Colcectlons and con t rac t s of speeiflc amounts for repayments to reclamation fund 

Gapltnl in vestment: 

Disbirsement trm^f^. and Joint construotion vouchers ro'^eived 13,461,407.47 

Collection . transfta', refond, and Joint canstructicn vouchers issued 756, 006. 73 



10,190.61 

438.72 

2,036,426.72 



Net investment. 



Feature costs of Klamath project to June SO, 1919. 



2,706,400.74 



Principal feature. 


FlscRlTwr 
1910. 


Total to June 
39, 1919. 


If xamination and surveys: Project as a whole 


. 19.398.34 


.I137>3ia2.02 




f!l«ar T^ke Ti^m ftn'' ''Ikes , . 


» 75.00 


332,279.88 
070.49 


Horsefly Reservoir site 










175.00 


3n,9JM).87 


Oanalsvstem: 

Main oanal .,....,.-.,. r . r . - .,. r 




696,968.88 
49,670.32 
193,495.09 


P^t Branch can*il - r . . . . , r . . . . 




South Branch cpnal 




Adams ^ Cf^rr canals 




182,384.57 


Lost River dlverslrn chflnnel 




308,312.69 


Orifnth rnnAi enlar'fmiient r x., . 




88,770.17 

57,0P0.00 

9,834.23 

812.62 


Ankenv Canal 




T^n^ftll Vftll^y <>1inal!!^ . r . r . ., r . , . - . x . , . ^ . r t . r x . , 




J r.^nt\] - ' ,,,--,,,,.,,,,., , . , . , , . . 




J cmwt heftdwoi'iia . , . . , , . . 




230.06 


8outh Bmnr!h cutoff , 




i*«te!ii 


SiinnlAmpfntAl Ronfltmntimi first nntt . . ^ _ ^ 












1,588,693.58 








Lateral system: 

First unit 




150,880.54 
114,496.51 
44,029.30 
20,854.09 


Second unit 


111,12 
j' 320. 54 


Third unit ,.... , 

Supplemmtal constniction flrst unit 






2,424.00 


339,200.44 


Drainage svstem: 

First unit 




112,282.89 
487.74 


Second unit 




Lan«ell Vallev 




428.16 


Lower Klamath Lake 




9,147.28 

2,650.02 

13,013.74 

287,974.86 


Pumpin? units 




TuiexSre!^. :::.::::::::::::::::::::::::::;::::::;;::::::::::::: 


« 18,013.74 
44,488.01 


. Supiriemental construction, first tniit 






57,901.75 


425,934.69 


Power system: 

KenoMnal 




111,329.02 
740.10 


South Branch power plant 




McCormick tract...... 




U4M.62 
3i415.38 


• Vi'yitttiact 














126,909.12 









1 Deduct. 

* Transfer of cost faiourred durins Aaoal year 1918 from supplemental to original construction. 



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302 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 
Feature costs of Klamath project to June SO, 1919 — Continued. 



Principal feature. 



Farm units: 

SeTcmlttnii. ^ 

Third unit 

MftTgirifti lands, below third unit . 



Fiscal vear 
1919. 



$287.54 



287.54 



Perminent improvements: Headquarters 

Telephone system: Project as a whole 

Operation anl mUntenm^e durin? construction (water-rental basis) 

Operation and maintenin^e charges transferred to and compounded with 
construction charges 



Total cost of construction features. . 



Balance in plant accounts 

Balan3e in unadjusted clearing accounts. . 



Gross construction cost to June 30, 1919.. 

Less revenues earned during construction: 
Rentals of buillings.. 



Rentals of grazin? and farming lands. 

Rentals of irrigation water 

Contractors freight refunds 

Other reventies, unslassifled 

Profit on hospital operations 



Net cost of construction of project to June 30, 1919. . 



1 33,945.58 
2,160.45 



105,043.26 



« 106.44 



586.64 

« .66 

280.40 



759.94 



Total to JoiM 
30, 1919. 



$2,609.15 

1,640. It 

622.41 



4,871.75 



20,048.72 
26,185.87 
65,866.88 

3,712.03 



8,057,731.37 



31,794.15 
2,676.00 



3,092,101.52 



144.50 

17,342.03 

31,821.45 

9,142.35 

902.05 

1,407.95 



60,760.33 



104,883.32 



3,031,341.19 



1 Inslades $32,53^.19 tranifer of operations and maintenance costs for years 1907 and 1908 to operaUon and 
maintenance during construction. 
« Deduct. 

Statement of cost by calendar years, Klamath project. 





Construction. 


Operation and maintenance. 




Year ending Dec. 31— 


During con- 
struction. 


Under pub- 
Uc notice. 


Total. 


Total cost. 


1904 


$11,498.31 
65,987.53 
531,011.27 
675,762.74 
274,708.96 








$11,498.31 
65,987.53 


1905 








1906 








531,011.27 
675,762.74 


1907 ^ 








1908 




> $32, 520. 19 
21,735.08 
20,000.49 
20,981.02 
21,318.18 
30, 479. 31 
31. 898.26 
» 33, 790. 54 
♦13,635.90 
48,447.03 
28.524.97 
•1,475.67 


$32,520.19 
21,735.08 
20,000.49 
20,981.02 
21,318.18 
30,479.31 
31,898.26 
58,653.94 
20,974.42 
49,592.29 
31,079.51 
31,489.49 


307, 229. 15 


1909 


246,820.94 
96,939.10 
261,951.81 
85,609.17 
143,894.77 
187,552.99 
132, 673. 79 




268,556.02 


1910 




116,939.50 
282,932.83 
106,927.35 
174,374.08 


1911 




1912 




1913 




1914 




119,451.25 
191,327.73 
160,025.91 


1915 


«i2i Rfia.4n 


1916 


133,951.49 7,'a38.52 
100,415.35 1,145.28 
101,683.55 2,554.54 
35,402.72 |» 32,965. 16 


1917 


150,007.64 


1918 


132,763.06 
66,^21 


Jan. 1 to June 30, 1919 






Subtotal 


2,991,864.49 ' A<i.8Afi.88 


304,855.30 


370,722.18 


3,382,586.67 
31,794.15 
2,576.00 


Balance in plant accounts 


31,794.15 
2,576.00 


' 


TTnftfijUSte^if^ earing accountji. - . 
















Total to June 30, 1919 


3 026,234.64 AT* R6A.5VI 


304,855.30 


370,722.18 


3,396,956.82 




1 


' 1 



» Actual cost for year $20,089.92 account of including $12,430.27 cost for 1907. Total transferred to "Opera- 
tion and maintenance during construction." 

* Actual cost for year $12,251.77 account of inchiding $9,611.63 cost for 1914. 
» Actual cost for year $26,584.14 account of adjustment of $10,206.14 in 1916. 

* Actual cost for year $23,842.30. See note under 5. 

» Actual cost for period $444.97 account of including $12,430.27 cost for 1907, also $20,089.92 cost for 1908. 

* Deduct credit caused by transfer of cost incurred in previous years to ''Operation and maintenance 
during construction." 



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OBEGON-GALIPORNU, KLAMATH PBOJECT. 
Statement of coat hyjitcal yearSf Klamath project. 



809 





Constmction. 






Year ending June 30- 


During con- 
stfuction^ 


Undcrpub- 


Total. 


Total cost. 


1906 


134,650.30 
172,264.23 
827, 03a 70 
303,201.46 
319,322.32 
196,619.44 
119,672.90 
221,140.67 
132,068.25 
107,320.76 
164,780.10 
106,912.43 
108,467.37 
118,917.88 
71,697.68 








$34,550.30 
172,264.23 
827,03a 70 
320,968.47 
342,882.60 
217,619.20 
142, 68a 80 
236,885.28 
156,092.76 
141,330.79 


1906 








1907 






1008 




$18,767.01 
23, 56a 28 
21,999.76 
23,107.90 
15,744.61 
24,024.61 
34,0ia03 
39,312.81 
18,275.44 
29,579.92 
36,643.74 
19,829.29 


$18,767.01 
23,66a 28 
21,999.76 
23,107.90 
16,744.61 
24,024.61 
34,0ia03 
52,218.89 
30,202.71 
35,093.75 
38,217.86 
53,774.87 


1909 




1010 




1911 




1912 




1913 




1914 


$12,966.08' 

11,927.27 

6,513.83 

1,674.12 

33,945.68 


1916 


207,007.99 
137,115.14 
143,551.12 
157, 135. 74 


1916 


1917 


1918 


1919 


126,472.55 




Subtotal 


2,991,864.49 
31,794.16 
2,576.00 


65,866.88 


304,866.30 


370,722.18 


3,362.586.67 
31,794.15 
2,676.00 


Balance in plant accounts 


Una4juste<f clearing accounts 
















Total 


3,026,234.64 


66,866.88 


304,865.30 


370, 722. 18 ^ ^^^ f^f^ ^ 









Non.— See explanatory notea on table of costs by calendar year. 

Ettimated cott of contemplated work, Klamath projeetf during fiscal year 1920. 



Features. 



I Subfeature. 



Principal 
feature. 



Examination and surveys. . . . 
Canal sjrstem: 

Concrete linlnje; 

Construction C~Q cut-off. 



Lateral system 

Drainage system: 

Ankeny lands. 

First unit 



$40,000 
76,000 



Operation and maintenance, water rentals. 
Operation and maintenance, public notice.. 
Reimbursable accounts 



19,000 
13,000 



Total. 



$4,000 



115,000 
6,000 



32,000 
2,000 

54.000 
2,000 



214,000 



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304 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL BEPOBT OF BEOLAMATION SERVICE. 
Operating eoets and revenues j Klmnath projed^ to Dec. 31, 1918. 



Feature. 



COSTS. 

Canal system: First, second, and 

^ thltdunlts 

Lateraf system: 'Fifst, Second, and 

third units 

Drainage system: First unit, open 

drains 

Flood protection: First unit 



$11,579.51 
8,564.11 



ToIaL 

Less accrued and unpaid operation 
and nuUntenance charges trans- 
ferred to and added to construc- 
tion charges 



Total. 



REVENUKS. 

Operation and maintenance charges 
accrued on contracts with water- 
right applicants 

Operation and maintenance charges 
paid in advance by water-right 
applicants 



paid and forfeited by water-ri^t 
applicants 

Penalties on operation and mainte- 
nance charges accrued on contracts 
with water-ri^t applicants 

Rental of land and buildings during 
operating period 

Rentals of Irrigation water 

Other revenues, unclassified, earned 
during operating period 

Less discount lUlowed on operation 
and maintenance charges accrued 
on contracts with water-right ap- 
plicants 



Total 

Difference: 

Gain for calendar year 1918. 

D|eQoit^ to^end^oi c^ftendar 
year 



Calendar year 1918. 



Opera- 
tbn. 



20,143.62 



Mainte- 
nance. 



$10,721.53 

14,766.75 

485.39 



$22,301.04 

23,33a SB 

485.39 



25,973.67 



Total. 



$49,078.86 



46,117.29 



1281.63 



45,835.66 

57,917.87 
> 142. 21 



374.67 

623.10 
1,127.50 



•913.05 



58,987.88 
13,152.22 



To end of calendar year 1918. 



Opera- 
tion. 



$61,728.41 

134,S16;9(K' 

1,421.25 
10,792.63 



99,621.36 



208,261.19 



Mainte- 
nance. 



$110,807.27 

«Mn»-40 

1,421.2.5 
10,792.63 



Total. 



307,882.55 



» 1,551.58 



306,33a 97 
s 265,910. 17 

3.75 

944.48 

1,315.10 
5,476.59 

38.71 
S3, 008. 05 



270,823.96 
35, 507. (ft 



1 Deduct. 

s Credit -of $11.52 account of 1918 accruals taken into accounts in February, 1919. 

* Deduct. 

Nars.— Included in* the deficit to end of calendar vear 1918 is an Item of $32,520.10, representine operation 
and maintenance charges for the years 1907 and 190S, which will be transterred to operation and mainte- 
nance during construction in 1919. It also Includes an Item of $2,160.43, representing operation and main- 
tenance accruals transferred to and added to construction charges in 1919, thus malrlng net deHcit to 
Dec. 31, 1918, only $826.37. 



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SOUTH DAKOTA, BELLS FOTJBCHE PBOJBCT. 

B. E. Hayuen, project manager, Newell, S. Dak. 
LOOATION. 

Gountiee: Butte and Meade. 

Townships: 6 to 10 N., Rs. 3 to 8 E., Black Hills meridian. 

Railroada: Chicago St North Western; Chicago, Burlington & Quincy; Chicago, 
Milwaukee & St. Paul. 

Railroad stations and estimated population June 30, 1919: Belle Fourche, 1,450; 
Newell, 400; Nisland, 200; Fruitdale, 75; Vale, 75. 

WATER SUPPLY. 

Source of water supply: Belle Fourciie River. 
Area of drainage basin: 4,265 square miles. 

Annual nin-off in acre-feet: Belle Fourche River at diversion dam (4,265 square 
miles), 1903 to 1918— maximum, 554,600; minimum, 119,800; mean, 308,180. 

AamCTTLTUBAL AND CLIMATIC CONDITIONS. 

Area for which the service is prepared to supply water, season of 1919: 82,592 acres. 

Area under water-right applications, season of 1919: 71,694 acres. 

Length of irrigaticn season: May 1 to October 1 — 152 days. 

Average elevation of irrigable area: 2,800 feet above sea level. 

Rainfall on irrigable area: 10 years, average, 14.78 inches; 1918, 17.56 inches. 

Range of temperature en irrigable area: -38° to 103** F. 

Character of soil of irrigable area: North side of Belle Fourche River principallv 
heavy clay soil, with scattered areas of sandy clay loam; south side, sandy loam. All 
of the soils are heavy enough not to be disturbed by winds. 

Principal products: Grain, com. alfalfa^ potatoes, garden truck, and sugar beets. 
' Principal markets: Omaha, Neor.; Chio^, 111.; and mining towns in the Black 
Hills. 

LANDS OPENED FOB IBItiaATION. 

Dates of public notices, regulations, and orders relating thereto: June 21, 1907; 
May 29, 1908; January 18, 1909; February 19, November 26, 1910; January 24, March 
9, May 4, December 30, 1911; February 3, May 2, 1912; February 26, June 23, July 21, 
1913; January 19, February 26, May 29,. August 14, September 24, 1914; April 10, 
May 18, 1915; March 10, March 16. July 6, 1916; January 9, February 10, October 4, 
1917; April 10, 1918; March 8, April 28, 1919. 

Location: Tps. 7 to 10 N., Rs. 2 to 7 E. 

Limit of area of farm units: Public, 80 acres; private, 160 acres. 



Duty of water: 1.5 acre-feet per acre per annum at the farm. 
Building charge per acre of irrigable land: $30, $35, 



; $35, $40, and $45. 
Annual operation and maintenance charge: For 1918, $1 per acre-foot for water 
used in July and August, and 50 cents per acre-foot for all otner water used, with a 
minimum rate of $1.25 per acre. For 1919, same plan except that rates are raised to 
$1.20, 60 cents, and $1.50, respectively.. * 

CHBONOLOGICAL ST7MMABY. 

Reconnoissance and preliminary surveys b^n in 1903. 

Construction recommended by board of engineers April 29, 1904. . 

Construction authorized by Secretary May 10, 1904. 

Diversion dam and inlet canal completed September, 1907. 

Belle Fourche Dam completed June, 1911. 

First irrigation, season of 1908. 

Entire project 84 per cent completed June 30, 1919. 

138654—19 20 305 



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306 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

IBItiaATION PLAN. 

The irrisfation plan of the Belle Fourche project provides for the diversion of water 
from the Belle Fourche River by means of a dam about 1} miles below Belle Fourche, 
S. Dak., and an inlet or supply canal about 6} miles in length into a storaire reservoir 
controlled by the Belle Fourche Dam on Owl Creek, a tributanr of the Belle Fourche 
River; the mstributinn of water from the inlet canal to a small area of land and the 
distribution of water from the reservoir through two canal systems to lands on both 
sides of the Belle Fourche River. 

The United States claims all waste, seepage, unappropriated spring, and percolating 
waters arising within the project, and proposes to use such water in connection 
therewitli. 

The features of the above irrigation plan completed are the diversion dam, head- 
works, inlet canal. Belle Fourche storage dam, south canal and laterals, north canal 
and all tributary laterals and structures. The features not yet constructed are 
Willow Creek and Nine Mile laterals and their tributaries, covering approximately 
15,000 acres of land. 

SUMMABY OF QENEItAL DATA FOB BELLE FOUBCHE PBOJECTT TO 
END OF FISCAL YEAB 1010. 

Areas: 

Irrigable acreage when project is complete 97, 889 

Public land entered to June 30, 1919 36,992 

Public land open to entry on June 30, 1919 882 

Public land withdrawn on June 30, 1919 15, 300 

State land unsold June 30. 1919 315 

Private land June 30, 1919 44,400 

Acreage service could have supplied in season of 1918 82, 592 

Estimated acreage service can supply in season 1 91 9 82, 592 

Estimated acreage service can supply in season 1920 82, 592 

Acreage irrigated, season of 1918 " 52,445 

Acreage cropped under irrigation, season of 1918 52, 445 

Acreage dry farmed, season of 1918 800 

Crops: 

Value of irrigated crops, season of 1918 $1, 276, 115. OQ 

Value of irrigated crops per acre cropped 24.36 

Value of dry-farmed crops, season of 1918 8,000.00 

Value of diy-farmed crops per acre cropped 10. (JO 

Finances: 

Net construction cost to June 30, 1919 $3, 463, 266. 97 

Percent completed on June 30, 1919 84 

Appropriated for fiscal year 1920 $141,000 

Estimated per cent complete by June 30, 1920 84 

Proposed appropriation for fiscal year 1921 $120, 000 

Estimated per cent complete by June 30, 1921 85. 3 

Announced construction chaiges per acre ^0, $35, $40, and $45 

Appropriation, fiscal year 1919 $262, 000. 00 

Miscellaneous collections and transfers 7, 770. 31 

Increased compensation -4, 568. 51 

: $274,338.82 

Expenditures chai^geable to 1919 appropriation: 

Disbursements ' $75, 450. 81 

Transfers 276. 18 

Current liabilities 10, 430. 54 

Contingent liabilities 60. 00 

86,217.53 

Unencumbered balance on July 1, 1919 188,121.29 



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SOUTH DAKOTA, BEIXE F0X7BGHE PROJECT* 307 

Repayments: 

Value of construction water-right contracts |2, 394, 007. 00 

Construction chaiiges — 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 331, 076. 91 

Collected to June 30, 1919 313,257.3d 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 17,819.53 

Operation and maintenance charges (public notice) — 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 374,855.24 

Collected to June 30, 1919 325,842.90 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 49,012.34 

Water-rental charges — 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 3,088.44 

Collected to June 30, 1919 2,938.44 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 150.00 

Drainage: 

Estimated acreage damaged by seepage to June 30. 1919 2, 800 

Cost of drainage works to June 30, 1919 (investigations) 13, 344. 27 

CONSTBTJCnOK DUBINa THE FISCAL YEAB. 

The project was not extended during the fiscal year except that 
about 1 mile of small lateral was built to include 147 acres of high 
land along the north canal. This work was not completed on 
June 30. 

Two small four-room cottages were built in Newell for housing 
Grovemment employees. The cost was $5,235. 

Adjudication surveys covering the Redwater canal system were 
made during the year and investigations made and data secured to 
determine tne feasibility of the proposed Chicken Creek Reservoir. 

SEEPAGE AND BEAXNAGE. 

It is estimated that the seeped area of the project increased about 
150 acres during the year. There seems to be no disposition on the 
part of the water users to take steps to correct this condition. 

A contract was let under supplemental construction on March 29, 
1919, for the construction of approximately 5,000 feet of surface 
drain to take care of waste and storm waters in the Deer Creek 
district about 4 miles northeast of Newell. The work had not been 
commenced at the close of the fiscal year. 

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE. 

The water supply for the season of 1918 was adequate for all 
lands under the project. The total flow of the Belle Foutche River 
for the year was 252,804 acre-feet. Storage at the end of the 
season amounted to 128,750 acre-feet. 

llie number of farms furnished with water was 906, comprising 
an irrigable area of 70,651 acres, of which 52,445 acres were irri- 
gated; 51,731 acre-feet of water were delivered to farms, the duty 
of water being 0.99 acre-foot per acre. 

Service on flie south canal was interrupted from June 28 to July 8, 
1918, and again on September 16, at which time the canal was closed 
down for the season. The trouble was caused by the slipping away 



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308 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SBRYIGB. 

of the earth embankment supporting the lined section of the canal. 
The damage to crops resulting from these interruptions was light, 
due to the more than usual amount of precipitation at that time of 
year. 

Following an extremely dry winter and spring the irrigation 
season of 1919 commenced on May 15 and from that date until 
June 30 the canals were running at near capacity for the greater 
part of the time. Many crops were irrigated up and an abundance 
of water is being reauired. The season was started with the reser- 
voir full and an ample supply is assured for all lan^s furnished from 
the reservoir. By June 5 the flow in the Belle Fourche River avail- 
able for the Johnson lateral and inlet canal had dropped to 18 sec- 
ond-feet, and from that date to June 30 there was little more than 
sufficient water for the irrigation of gardens. Crops in this section 
Were materially damaged. 

Besides the usual routine of maintenance work, extensive repairs 
were made on the south canal at the concrete-lined section, and two 
wooden chutes totaling 800 feet in length on the Richards lateral 
were replaced by concrete structures. On the north canal a con- 
crete check was installed below the Kapelski lateral. 

fflUoricil reuis'M, Bzlle Fo ttrche project. 



Item. 



AoreBge for which service was prepared to 

supply water , 

Acreage irri^ted , 

Miles of canal operated 

"Water diverted (aere-feet) 

Water delivered to farms (acre-feet ) 

Per acre of land irrigated (acre-feet) 



1914 



68,852 
37,454 
498 
145,284 
54,232 
1.45 



1915 



78,591 
44,067 
528 
135,804 
16,484 
0.37 



1916 1 


1917 


1918 


1119 > 


78,591 
48,468 ; 
529, 
58,395 


83,335 
51,000 
612 
171,749 
61,134 
1.21 


82,502 
52,445 
612 
190,844 
51,731 
6.90 


82,502 

60,000 

613 


39 m 




6.81 ' 




1 





1 To June 30, 1919, estimated. 
SETTLEMENT AND DEVELOPMENT. 

No new imit3 were opened to settlement during the year. The 
development of units already opened was satisfactory and the results 
gratifying. Twenty-one new filings were made and there remain 
only ten unentered farm units on the project. 

The commissioner of State school and public lands held an auction 
sale of school lands within the project on April 2, 1919, at which 
2,124 acres of irrigable land were sold. The nighest price paid was 
$69 per acre, and the price paid in general was about 300 per cent 
higher than at the sale one year previous. Nearly all of these lands 
are now being farmed. There is now practically no imsold school 
land within the project. 

A large area oi native sod was broken and planted to crop during 
the year and old acreages continue to be farmed. There have been 
quite a few sales of reed estate, and, generally speaking, farm values 
have increased from 60 to 100 per cent. 



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SOUTH DAKOTA, BELLE FOURGHE PROJECT. 309 

SetUemeiU data, Bdle Fowcke project. 



Item. 



1915 



TotalmmilMroriMiiisonproJeot 1,892 

Poputetlan 2,375 

NmtMraf|iTls»todbnn5 717 

Operated fc^owncn.., I 468 

Operated by teiiMUe M- 

Populetioii I 1,877 

NuBiber of towns , 5 

Popnlatioii 2,050 

TbtalpoptiletionintownsaBdontenBe...l 4,425 

Number of pubUc schools 23 

Number of ohorolMS I 11 

Number of benks 9 

Total capital stock I $140,000 

Amount of deposits i 91,145,731 

Number of depositors | 3,728 



191« 



1,292 

2,375 

744 

495 

949 

2,0(77 

1,775 

4,150 

23 

11 

9 

9140,000 

$1,464,305 

4 228 



1917 



1,898 

2,400 

813 

553 

360 

2,150 

1,845 

4,245 

23 

11 

9 

$140,000 

$2,206,193 



1918 



1,298 

2,675 

906 

590 

316 

2,434 

2,100 

4,776 

24 

11 

9 



$2,391,262 



I 



1919 



1,292 

2,700 

906 

590 

316 

2,450 

2,200 

4,900 

24 

U 

9 



PBINOIPAL CBOP8. 

Atfalfa and wheat are the two principal crops on the project, 
althou^ barley, com, potatoes, and sugar beets are crops of con- 
sideraole importance, in 1918 there were 20,467 acres of alfdfa 
and 9,563 acres of wheat on the project. The average values per 
acre for these crops were $24.72 and $29.83, respectively. 

The total area cropped in 1919 is about 60,000 acres. Of this area 
there are approximately 25,000 acres in alfalfa and 12,000 acres in 
wheat. 

Crop repoTtf Btlle Fonrche project ^ South Dakota, year of 1918. 



Crop. 



AUaUshay 

Allallaseed. 

Barley 

Beans 

Beets, sugar 

Com. 

Com fodder 

Garden 

Hay, native 

Gaits. 

Pasture 

Potatoes 

Rye 

Wheat 

Miscellaneoas 

Less duplicated areas 

Total orapped acreage. 



Total irrigated.. 



Area 

(acres). 



20,467 

342 

1,638 

-146 

1,087 

2,068 

848 

421 

3,209 

4,331 

8,8»4 

227 

108 

9,563 

812 

1,214 



Unit of 
yleW. 



52,445 



52,445 



Ton 

Bushel. 
...do...., 
..do..... 

Ton 

Bushel.. 
Ton 



Ton 

Bushel. 



Bushel. 
..do.... 
..do.... 



Yields. 



Total. 



A\ erare 
per acre. 



42,032 

362 

40,775 

1,561 
10,603 I 
43,830 

1,884 



2.06 

1.06 
24.90 
10.69 

9.77 
21.2 

2.12 



3,610 
137,066 I 



1.12 
31.7 



23,380 ' 

1,504 
152,674 



103 
13.92 
15.7 



.1. 



Total and average . 



Values. 



Per unit 
of yield. 



$12.00 
9.00 
I.OD 
4.20 
9.00 
1.40 
8.00 



18.00 
.70 



.90 
1.25 
1.90 



Total. 



1504,384 

3,258 

40,776 

6,556 

96,427 

61,332 

18,072 

17,618 

64,980 

95,946 

61, »9 

21,042 

1,880 

290,080 

» 5,856 



1,276,116 



Per acre. 



$24.73 
9.54 
M.9D 
44.90 
87.03 
29.68 
16.96 
41.90 
20.16 
22.19 
6.84 
92.70 
17.40 
29.83 
18. 7S 



M.36 



Areas. 



Trri^Bble area farms reported 

Irrigated area farms reported 

Under water-right applications. 

Under rental contracts 

Cropped area farms reported 



Acres. 



70,661 
62,445 
52,310 
186 
52,445 



Farms. 



906 
906 
905 

1 
906 



Per 
cent of 
project.* 



72.1 
61.4 
51.4 



61.4 



1 Based on 97,916 acres. 



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310 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 
PUBLIC NOTICES AND ORDERS. 
PUBLIC NOTICE, MARCH 8, 1919. 

1. Annual operation and maintenance charges. — ^In pursuance of 
section 4 of the reclamation act of June 17, 1902 (32 Stat., 388), and 
of acts amendatory thereof or supplementary thereto, particularly 
the reclamation extension act of August 13, 1914 (38 Stat., 686), 
announcement is made as follows: The minimum annual operation 
and maintenance charge for the irrigation season of 1919, and there- 
after until further notice, against all lands of the Belle Fourche 
project. South Dakota, under public notice, shall be $1.50 per 
irrigable acre whether water is used thereon or not. During the 
months of July and August water will be furnished for $1.20 per 
acre-foot, and during the balance of the irrigation season for 60 
cents per acre-foot. Payments under the minimum charge wiU be 
credited on the account for water received under the above acre- 
foot rates. All operation and maintenance charges under the 
project will be payable on March 1 of each year for the preceding 
irrigation season, but where water- right application is made after 
June 15 for public land and after August 1 for private and State 
lands, no operation and maintenance charge will be made for water 
delivered during the remainder of the irrigation season in which the 
water-rig'it application is made. 

2. Repairs on Belle Fonrche Reservoir. — ^The operation and main- 
tenance charges to cover repairs on Belle Fourche Reservoir an- 
nounced in paragraph 2 of public notice dated October 4, 1917, are 
additional to the operation and maintenance charges announced in 
paragraph 1 of this notice. 

S. G. Hopkins, 
Assistant Secretary of the Interior, 

PUBLIC NOTICE, APRIL 28, 1919. 

1. Status of State school lands. — Prior to the enactment of the 
reclamation extension act of August 13^ 1914 (38 Stat., 686), school 
lands of the State of South Dakota, Ijrmg within the BeUe Fourche 

E reject, were subjected by State legislation (sec. 69, chap. 180, 
laws of South Dakota, 1907) to the terms and conditions of the 
reclamation law, within the meaning of section 2 of said extension 
act. Until such lands are sold by the State, they have the status 
neither of private nor entered lands, but are rather in the same 
category as unentered public lands of the United States, and are 
not subject to the penalties provided by section 9 of said extension 
act. 

2. Constrnction charges. — State school lands under public notice, 
lying witliin the first, second, third and fourth units of the Belle 
Fourche project, are subject to a construction charge of $40 per 
irrigable acre, and such lands under public notice lying within the 
fifth unit of said project are subject to a construction charge of $45 
per irrigable acre, in each case said construction charge shall be 
paid by the water-right apj^licant in 10 equal annual instalments, 
the first of which shall be paid at the time of filing water-right appli- 
cation, and subsequent instalments shall be due and payable Decem- 



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SOUTH DAKOTA, BRLLE FOUKOHB PROJECT* 811 

ber 1 of each year thereafter: Provided j Tioweverj that if water- 
right application subject to the provisions of said reclamation 
extension act, or an acceptance of the provisions of said act, be 
filed within six months from the date of this notice for lands hereto- 
fore sold by the State, or within six months from the date of sale 
for lands hereafter sold by the State, said construction chaise shall 
be pav^ble in 20 instalments^ the first of which shall be due and 
payable on December 1 f ollowmg the date of water-right application, 
and subsequent instalments on December 1 of each year there- 
after; in which event the first four instalments shall each be 2 per 
cent, the next two instalments each 4 per cent, and the next 14 
each 6 per cent of the total construction charge. The whole or any 
part 01^ the construction charge may be paid within any shorter 
period if so desired. 

3. Increased construction charges. — In all cases where water-right 
application for the above-described lands shall not be made within 
one year from the date of this notice, for lands heretofore sold by 
the State or within one year after the date of sale by the State for 
lands hereafter sold by the State, the construction charge for such 
land shall be increased 5 per cent each year until such application 
is made. 

4. Amendment. — ^Any public notice or order heretofore issued for 
the Belle Fourche project which may be in any manner inconsistent 
with this public notice, is amended to conform herewith. 

John W. Hallowell, 

Assistant to the Secretary of the Interior. 

FINANCIAL STATEHENT. 

Condensed balance sheet, Belle Fovrche project, June SO, 1919, 

Cash $2,967.74 

In ventor V of materials and supplies on hand 33, 873. 34 

Accounts receivable: . 

CuiTpnt aoooiints W7,001.87 

CoQstruotion water-right charges unaccmed 3, 053, 709. 48 

3,120,711.35 

I'onstruction work contracted 50.00 

<jro8s construction cost 3, 479, 801 . 66 

Less construction re venae earnings $13, 799. 40 

Less cost adjustments 3, 735. 29 

16,534.69 

Net oonstniction cost 3, 463,266w 97 

Gross o-ieration an J maintenance cost 553,367. 30 

Less operation and maintenance revenue earnings 4, 509. 1 1 

Less cost adjustments » 315. 92 

4,353.19 

648,914.01 

Accounts pavable ift, WW. 40 

Contingent oMle^^tions 3,oi«.40 

Collections and contracts of specific amounts for repayaments to reclamation fond 2, 773. 444. 20 

Net re enues from sale of town-site lots 61 , 878. 46 

Capital in estment: 

Dw lurseraent, transfer, and joint construct ion- vouchers received 4, 104, 082. 40 

ToUection, transfer, refund, and joint construction-\ ouchcrs Issued 800, 03 1 . 64 

Net iuN'estment 3,304.050.7ft 

> Contra entry. 



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312 BIGHTEBNTH AFNTJAL REPOBT OF BECLAMATION SEBVIOE. 
Peatwe co$t ofBdU Fourche project. 



Principal features. 



Fiscal vear 
1010. 



Total to 
Jane 90, 1010. 



BxaminatloQ and surve/ 

Storase works: 

Dl /ersioD Dam in Belle Fourche Ri ver 

Feedcinal 

Belle Fourche Dam 

SuDDlemental constniction on Belle Fourctie Dam . 
Johnson literal storage in x^estiisattous 



$806.00 



1*15,876.00 
17,489.00 
'24,172.00 



3,27S.70 



133,109.66 

840,070.36 

1,260,222.27 

33,187.93 

3, 578. 14 



Total. 



50,814.59 



l,770,M8.36 



Canal svstem: 
North oanal. 
South canal . 



> 5, 23a 33 



Total.. 



5,288.33 



500,521.56 
493,8^0.50 



094,402.06 



Lateral system: 

Lateral didsion A 

Lateral division B 

Lateral division C 

Lateral division D 

South oanal e^ctenaion 

Comoloting imlnlshed deli> eries. . . 
Willow (reek lateral investigations.. 
Nine Mile (Yeek in » estimations 



199.30 



312. 13 



6:17.18 

427 22 

« 249. 63 



252,781.75 

120,230. 17 

67,710.48 

134,176.32 

86,609.44 

1,877.88 

1,216.78 

4,055.24 



Total.. 



1,226.20 1 628. 64a 01 



Drainage svstem: 

In V e^tlE^itions 

Supplemental con^tnirtlon (Deer Treek drnin^ 

Total 

Farm unit surveys 



3. .50 



s.riO 



Permanent improvements: 

nniliinps 

Real estate 



Total 

Telephone s>'stem. 



Operation ani maintenance charges transferred to anl corapoundoi with 
construction charges 



Gross cost to June 30, 1919.. 



Less revenues earned during constnictlon period: 

Rentfil of buil lings 

Rental of grazing and farming Hn Is 

Rentals of irrigation wat^r 

Rentals of telephones and tolls 

Contractors and freight refunds 

Other revenues, imdasslfled 

Profit on hospital operations 



Total revenues 

Net construction cost, June 30, 1919. , 



M,877.07 
• 54, 107. 10 



3.344.27 
3.50 



3, .347. 77 



6,246.64 



42,130.86 



» 49,230.03 



880. 65 



8,93.3.24 



596. .V) 

20.00 

110.00 

1.20 



177. Z5 



905.00 



8, 02a 24 



42.130.86 
~ 14,1^767 

18,77a 20 
3,479,801.66 



6,08a 95 
2.707.70 
1,020.00 
88.68 
2.880.32 
923.75 
2,735.20 



16,534.69 



3,463,266.97 



* Vmo'mts transferred from *' Permanent improvements, real estate." 

« Incl'iles $25,172.90 trAnsferrei from a'>ov'e feature; also $1,010 cust adjustment credit. 

« Credit. 

< Includes $230.67 transferred from " Permanent improvements, real estate." 



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SOUTH DAKOTA, BELLE FOUBCHE PBOJECT. 313 

Statement of cost j hy calendar yeartj BeUe Fourdie project ^ South Dakota. 





Construction. 


Operation and 

maintenance 

under put lie 

notice. 


Total cost. 


Year ending Dec. 31— 

1909 


$2,275,751.06 

372,23.5.93 

438,213.28 

61,906.76 

32,085 37 

!f7,0P7 36 

60,874 22 

108,886 04 

> 1,022 24 

3,'!22 23 

8,257.17 




?2,275,751.f6 


1910 




372,235.93 


1911 


«)6,682 90 
58,011.30 
55.737 46 
6\''6» 62 
47,542 16 
42, 106 36 
71.992 36 
75,947 13 
32. 442. 39 


534,806.18 


1912 


12^818 15 


1913 


88,672 83 


1914 


167, 157 98 


1915 


117,416 38 
151.992 40 


1916 


1917 


73,014.60 


I9I8 


7}, 569 36 


Jan. 1 to June 30, 1919 


40,699.50 


Balance in pi in t 


3,479,8)1.66 


541,422.77 
11,844.43 


4,021,224.43 
1 1 , 844. 43 








Total 


3,47.V8)1.6ft 


653,267.20 


4,033.068 86 



I Deiuct. 
Statement of cost ^ hy fiscal years ^ Belle Fourche project y South Dakota. 





Construction. 


Operation and 

maintenance 

under puhlic 

notice. 


Total cost. 


Yenr *»ndin? June 30— 

1910 


$2,422,853.38 
467,295.63 
2.54,448.01 




«2, 422, 853. 38 


191 1 




467. 205. 63 


1912 


S123.3»9.85 


377. H47. 86 


1913 


' 2 104 72 f A"^ "MW «A 


58, 287. 94 
126,483.19 


1t»14 


73.888.75 
109,944.28 
79.919.10 
66,936.60 
12,312.70 
8,933.24 


52,594.44 
55,748 66 
40,943.50 
53,901.66 
80,446.30 
73,995.61 


1915 


165,692.94 
120 S62 69 


1916 


1917 


121,838.35 


1918 


78,133.60 


1919 


82,928.85 




Balance on plant . .... 


3,479,801.66 


541,422.77 
11.84«,43 


4,021,224.43 
11,844.43 








Total •• 


3,479,801.66 


553,267.20 


4,033,068 86 







' Deiuct. 
EsPimxUed cost of contemplated work, Belle Fourche project, during fiscal year 1920. 



Principal features. 



Esti- 
maU»(l 
con. 



Storage system: Chicken Creek reservoir site 

Lateral system « 

Drainage* system: Doer Creek drain 

Farm units: Willow Creek unit 

OpemMon and maintenance under public notlct 

Rpimb irsable accounts 

Total 



$500 

2,500 

2,000 

900 

90.600 

1,500 

98,000 



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314 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPOKT OF RECLAMATION SEBYIGE. 
Operating'cost and revenuet. Belie Fotarehe project to Dec. SI, 1918. 





Calendar year 1918. 


To end of calendar year 1918. 


Item. 


Opera- 
tion. 


Mainte- 
nance. 


Total. 


•iGT 


Mainte- 
nance. 


Total. 


COST. 
Storage works: 


$1,482.86 
1,958.29 


$1,250.10 
492.64 

1,742.74 


$2,732 96 
2,450.93 

5, 183. 89 

7,471.90 
17,316.37 

21,788 27 


















120,595.56 






Total storaee works 


3,441.15 


$53,441.58 


$74,037.14 






Canal system: 

North can:il svstem ... 


1,339.71 
2,474.61 


6,132.19 
14,841.76 

20,973.95 

19,188 72 
8,719.03 
1,658.67 








Rmit.h mnn.! svAfiom . . 
















Totrftl canal ^yst^ni , 


3,814.32 


32, .323. 02 


113,195.56 ' 145,524.58 






Lateral system: 

North c an \1 literal system 


7,479.95 

1,810 43 

670.62 


26,668 67 
10.521.46 
2,229.19 

39,427.32 














Johnson lAtexal svstem 
















9,960.90 


29,466.42 


63,548.10 


222,155.50 


285,703.80 


Drainage system 


...: . 






3,624.44 
12,027.18 


3,624.44 


ments 




4,688.15 


4,688.15 
3,868.35 




12,027.18 


Water-right adjudication investiga- 
tions . . 


3,868.35 




3,868.35 


3,868.3.'> 


Supplemental construction charge- 

aolo to operation ani m lintcnanee: 

(a) Co?t to Aug. 81, 1914 




2,735.60 
326.86 


2,735.60 


\b) Cost since Sept. 1, 1914 










326.86 














Operation and maintenance cost. 

unpaid o >era ion nu'l miin- 

V'U m^ transferred to con- 

simotion 


21,084.72 


66,871.26 


77,955,98 

» 2,008 85 


120,341.03 


407,606.72 


627,847.75 
I 18,783.80 














Total 






75,947.13 






509,063.95 














REVENUES. 

Operations and maintenance charges 
accrued on contracts with water- 
ri^t applicants 






87,527.44 
230. 10 






1365,650.96 


Operation and maintenance charges 
paid in advance by water-right ap- 
plicants 










543.86 


Opsration and miintenmce charges 
paid and forf.Uted by watcr-right 
applicants 










508.65 


Penalties on op3ration and mainte- 
nance charges accrued on contracts 
with water-ri?ht applicants 






2,883.19 

711.91 
383. 75 

67.80 

U, 597. 96 
90.215.23 






5,399.19 


Rental of land and buildings during 
op3rating pjriol 










2,010.56 


Rentals of irri^tion water 










1,958.44 


Other revenues imclassifled, earned 
during operatins; p^^riod 










160.55 


Less di?count allowd on oparatins 
and miUntenince charges accrued 
on contracts with water-right ap- 
plicants .' 










S3,564.90 















Total 




372,667.31 




: 











DifT.>rence— 

D3flcit 






136,396.64 


Excess 






14,268.10 





















» Includes $87,527.44 accruals taken up in Jan., 1919. 



« Deduct. 



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UTAH, STBAWBEEBT VALLET PBOJEGT. 

J. L. Lttel, project manager, Provo, Utah. 

LOCATION. 

Ck)untie8: Utah and Wasatch. 

Townships: 9, 8 and 10 S., Rs. 1 to 3 E., Salt Lake base and meridian. 
Railroads: Denver & Rio Grande; Salt Lake Route. 

Railroad stations and estimated population, June 30, 1919: Payson, 3,000; Spanish 
Fork, 3,600; Springville, 3,700. 

WATEB SUPPLY. 

Source of water supply: Strawberry and Spanish Fork Rivers and a number of 
small streams and springs not on the watersheds of these two. Contemplated pump • 
ing plants. 

Area of drainage basins: Strawberry River, including Indian and Trail Hollow 
Creeks, 175 square miles; Spanish Fork River, 670 square miles. 

Annual run-off in acre-feet: Strawberry River, including Indian and Trail Hollow 
Creeks, 1903-1912, maximum 150,000, minimimi 49,000, mean 77,500; 1913-1918 (net 
inflow), maximum 104,000, minimum 35,000, mean C8,550. Spanish Fork River at 
Spanish Fork, 1903-1918, maximum 227,000, minimum 65,000, mean 122,520. 

AGRICXJLTTJBAL AND CLIMATIC CONDITIONS. 

Area for which the service is prepared to supply water during the season of 1919: 
50,000 acres: reservoir has in storage 220,000 acre-feet available for irrigation purposes. 

Length of irrigating season: April 15 to September 30, 169 days. 

Average elevation of irrigable area: 4,600 feet above sea level. 

Rainfall on irrigable area: At Provo, average 22 years, 14.67 inches: 1918^ 18.29 
inches. At Strawberry Reservoir: Average 6 years, 19.98 inches; 1918, 21.c8 inches. 

Range of temperature on irrigable area: —10° to 95°; mean temperature at Provo, 
49° F. 

Character of soil on irrigable area: Sandy loam, heavy clay, and var^ng mixture 
of both; black alluvium; loam; and gravel. Much of the soil is underlaid by a coarse 
gravel, and the natural drainage is excellent. 

Principal products: Alfalfa, hay, cereals, sugar beets, fruits, vegetables. 

Principal markets: Salt Lake City, Utah, and adjacent towns and mining districts. 

LANDS OPENED FOB IBBIGATION BY PUBLIC NOTICE. 

Spanish Fork unit, Oct. 9, 1915; May 9, 1916; May 21, 1917; Apr. 30, 1918; Acres. 

Mar. 11, 1919 31,351.84 

Lake Shore unit, Oct. 8, 1915; May 9, 1916; May 21, 1917; Mar. 11, 1919. . 5, 862. 97 

High-Line unit, May 13, 1916; May 21, 1917; Mar 11, 1919 21, 534. 84 

Power Canal unit, Jan. 14, 1918 60. 00 

Total e8,8C9.65 

In addition, the service has contracted to sell to Clinton, Soldier Fork, and Liamcnd 
Fork units, a total of 998.4 acre-feet of water per annum; also 4,707 acre-feet to the 
Mapleton irrigation district, 2,400 acre-feet to the Springville irrigation district with 
option to purchase 2,000 acre-feet more by May 1, 1920, 440 acre-feet to Spanish Fork 
CJity, and 1,700 acre-feet to Payson City. 

CHRONOLOGICAL STJIOCABY. 

Reconnoissance and preliminary surveys b^un in 1903. 
Construction recommended by board of engineers October 2, 1905. 
Construction authorized by Secretary, December 15, 1905. 
Excavation of tunnel completed June 20, 1912. 
Storing of water in Strawberry Reservoir begun July 14, 1912. 
Construction of Indian Creek Dike completSi September, 1912. 
Strawberry timnel formally opened September 13, 1913. 
Construction of Strawberry Dam completed September 20, 1913, 
Construction started on high-line canal January, 1915. 

315 



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316 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

First storage water used for irrigation June 27, 1915. 

Divisions 1 to 0, distribution system, practically completed December 31, 1915. 
High-line canal turned over to water users, April 24, 1916. 

Maple ton and Springville irrigation districts formed August 20, 1917, and Septem- 
ber 4, 1917, respectively. 
Mapleton lateral started March 15, 1918. 
Mapleton latei:al completed October 11, 1918. 
Project a»a wh^e 84 per cent completed^ June 30, 1919. 

IBBIGATION PLAN. 

The irrigation plan of the Strawberry Valley project provides for the storage of water 
in a reservoir on the Strawberry River; the discharge of the stored water tnrough the 
Strawberry tunnel, approximately 3} miles long, into Diamond Fork, a tributary of 
the Spanish Fork River; and the diversion of water from the Spanish Fork River 
into c^nal systems, watering lands east and south of Utah Lake, in Utah County. 
A hydroelectric plant on the south side of the river supplies power for construction 
and commercial purposes. Part of the power developed may ultimately be used for 
pumping water for irrigation of high lands and drainage of low lands. The United 
States claims all waste, seepage, unappropriated spring, and percolating water arising- 
within the project and purposes to use such water in connection therewith. 

The high-line unit, comprising approximately 25,000 acres, has at the present time 
been brought under irrigation by means of a canal system constructed by the United 
States. The Spanish Fork and Lake Shore units are supplied with water through 
their existing canal systems, which were constructed by them. Any necessary en- 
largements or extensions will be made by the water users comprising the various canal 
companies, for according to the terms of the contract between the United States and 
the canal companies, the responsibility of the United States ends with the delivery 
of the water at the heads of the various canals. In the case of the Soldier Fork, Dia- 
mond Fork, and Clinton districts, water belonging to appropriators Velow the con- 
fluence of Diamond Fork with the Spanish Fork River is used by persons above this 
point, and an equal amount of water is released from the Strawberry Reservoir for the 
benefit of the prior appropriators. The water users build all of the ditches and other 
irrigation structures themselves. 

The completetl features of the irrigation plan are: Diversion dam on the Spanish 
Fork River, power canal, the first unit of the hydroelectric power plant on the Spanish 
Fork River, all of the canal system of the high-line unit, including all canals and 
laterals irrigating Goshen Valley and the land between the west side of West Mountain 
and Utah Lake, the Mapleton lateral, capacity 85 second-feet, irrigating approxi- 
mately 10,000 acres of land in the vicinity of Mapleton and Springville, and the 
following features in connection with the Strawberry Reservoir: Strawberry Dam, 
Indian Creek Dike, Indian Creek and Trail Hollow feeder canal and appurtenant 
struct'.res, and the Eaat Portal camp. In connection with the construction of these 
features, 55 miles of wagon road, 44 miles of telephone lines, and 49i miles of high- 
tension transnission lines have been built. Power from the United States Recla- 
mation Service power house is being s^ipplied to the cities of Payson. Spanish Fork, 
Spring\^le, and Salem for lighting and commercial purposes. The United States 
built the high-tension lines from its power house to tnese towns. The towns built 
their own sibstations, with the exception of Springville, and own their distributing- 
system in all C183S. 

Two irrigation districts, Mapleton and Springville, have beem farmed under the 
State laws and contracts entered into between them and the United States for the 
purchafl3, under the Warren act, of about 7,107 acre-feet of water. Option has been 
given to the SpriuTrville irrigation district on an additional 2,000 acre feet to be pur- 
chased by May 1, 1920. 

In accordance with present plans, the work remaining to be done on the project 
consists of the construction of an extension of the high-line canal into Goshen Valley 
for the purpose of irrigating some 10.000 to 12.000 acres of land near Goshen and 
Elberta, the drainage of 7,400 acres of land in Goshen Valley north of the town of 
Goshen, and the drainage of 14,000 acres of land in what is known as the Payson 
Slough country north and east of Payson, in the vicinity of Salem, Benjamin, and 
Palmyra. All these plans are, however, tentative, and no work will be done, except 
the carrying on of the usual preliminary investigations, until the areas embraced m 
each are properly organized into irrigation or drainage districts under existing State 
laws, so tnat proper contracts may be made and United States investments protected. 

No construction will be done on the Spanish Fork or Lake Shore units, as contract^ 
with the canal companies on the units provide that the water from the project shan 
be delivered to the heads of the several existing canals and the companies Bh&n 
deliver it from these points to the lands. 



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UTAH, STRAWBERRY VALLEY PROJECT. 817 

SUXMABT OF aSNEBAL DATA FOB STBAWBEBBT VALLEY 
PBOJECT TO END OF FISCAL TEAB 1919. 

Areas: 

Irriffltble acreage when project is complete 60, 000 

Public land entered to June 30, 1919 1, 854 

Public land open to entry on June 30, 1919 46 

Private land June 30, 1919 58,100 

Acreage service could have supplied in season of 1918 50, 000 

Estimated acreage service can supply in season 1919 50, 000 

Estimated acreage service can supply in season 1920 50, 000 

Acreage irrigated season of 1918 32, 539 

Acreage cropped under irrigation season 1918 29, 788 

Crops: 

Value of irrigated crops season of 1918 $1, 642, 327. 00 

Value of irrigated crops per acre cropped $55. 13 

Finances: 

Net construction cost to June 30, 1919 $3, 479, 709. 15 

Per cent completed on June 30, 1919 84 

Appropriated for fiscal year 1920 $55, 000. 00 

Estimated per cent complete by June 30, 1920 84 

Proposed appropriation for fiscal year 1921 $86, 000 

Estimated per cent complete by June 30, 1921 84 

Announced construction charges pBi acre $80, $90 

Appropriation fiscal year 1919 » $59,000.00 

Balance from fiscal year 1918 appropriation 52, 515. 42 

Increase miscellaneous collections and transfers 39, 791. 77 

Appropriation for increased compensation 2, 917. 74 

$154, 224. 93 

Expenditures chargeable to 1919 appropriation: 

Disbursements $75, 440. 30 

Transfers-. 6, 918. 69 

Current liabilities 2,175.50 

Contingent liabilities 250. 00 

84, 784. 49 

Unencumbered balance on July 1, 1919 69, 440. 44 

Repayments: 

\ alue of construction water-right contracts 2, 596, 600. 15 

Construction charges — 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 127,249.66 

Collected to June 30, 1919 ." 120, 665. 90 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 6, 583. 76 

Operation and maintenance charges (public notice) — 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 64, 392. 43 

Collected to June 3Q, 1919 62, 347. 98 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 2, 044. 45 

Water rental charges — 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 5,213.89 

Collected to June 30, 1919 5, 213. 89 

Power charges — 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 40,231.79 

Collected on June 30, 1919 38, 277. 75 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 1,954.04 

» The fiscal year 1919 appropriation carried also the unexpended balance of the fiscal year 1918 
appropriation. 



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318 EIGHTEENTB ANNUAL REPORT OF RECSLAMATION SERVICE. 

CONSTBtJCTION DTJBIKG THE FISCAXi TBAB. 

Mapleton lateral, — ^No construction work was done during the year 
except the finishing of Mapleton lateral, which was started on March 

15 and completed on Octooer 11, 1918. 

The construction of this lateral involved the excavation of 123,250 
cubic yards of material; the construction of a reinforced concrete 
siphon, 46 inches in diameter, and 605 feet long, across the Spanish 
Fork River; a reinforced concrete siphon under the Denver & Rio 
Grande Railroad, 48 inches in diameter and 155 feet long; a double- 
barreled reinforced siphon, 27 inches in diameter, across Hobble 
Creek Canyon; the erection of 25 standard wooden bridges over the 
lateral; 16 metal cross flumes for carriage of existing water ditches; 

16 standard concrete turnouts; 6 cross culverts and one large wooden 
flume, 343 feet long. The construction was done for the most part 
by Government forces; a part, however, of the canal excavation 
was done by contract. The total cost of the lateral is approximately 
$131,000. Losses in the organization due to operation of the Army 
drafts, inefficient labor, and high cost of materials due to war condi- 
tions increased to some extent the cost of this construction work. 

STTBVEYS AND INVESTIGATIONS. 

Farm unit surveys, — During the year a considerable number of 
farm imit surveys were made on tracts of land desiring classification 
prior to signing up for water or changes made necessary by seepage. 

Field surveys — ^A special traverse was made from a point 80 feet 
above the Notch drop at Goshen Pass to a point above turnout 29 
in the high-line canal. 

The purpose of this survey was to determine the feasibility of 
installing two water turbines at the drops on the high-line canal at 
the Notdi drop and turnout 30 for pumpmg water from the high-line 
canal to an elevation 80 feet above it and conveying this water to 
about 1,200 acres of land north of Santaquin, which at present has 
only a partial right from Santaquin Creek. 

Proposed Nevhi survey. — Negotiations have been opened up by 
landowners in Juab County near Mona and Nephi for the purpose of 
having a preliminary survey made of a high-line lateral to divert 
waters of the Strawberry Valley project to their lands. To defray 
the expense of this survey the sum of $3,400 has been raised and 
placed to the credit of the United States; also a contract has been 
entered into between the United States and the landowners r^arding 
the expenditure of this money. The length of the proposed canal is 
about 55 miles and it will have a capacity of 150 to 200 second-feet. 

Investigations, — During the year investigations were carried on and 
reports made on the following secondary projects: Castle Peak, Dixie, 
Green River, Price River, and Hatch Town ; and reports made on 
the seeped area in Utah, especially around Castle Dale and Utah 
Lake. Silt investigations of the Virgin River, Dixie project, were 
completed and work discontinued. 

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE. 

Stora^ge works, — ^The several features comprising the storage works 
were operated and maintained without any imusual trouble except 
for minor repairs made to Strawberry Tunnel. A survey was made 
of Strawberry Tunnel at the end of the 1918 irrigation season and all 



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UTAH, STRAWBEBBY VALLEY PBO JECT. 



319 



cracks, rough places, and swellings noted on a profile, showing sides, 
floor, and arch. In the spring of 1919 a gang of men put in 24 timber 
sets, at four different places about 2 nmes in from West Portal, to 
strengthen the sides and arch at places where swelling ground was 
breakmg the concrete lining. 

The guards at Strawberry Dam were dismissed after the signing of 
the armistice and maintenance of the structure was left to the r^ular 
operation and maintenance forces. 

Power carhol, — ^The power canal was operated without incident 
throughout the year. The Spanish Fork diversion dam and main 
distribution (power) canal were in charge of one gate tender and two 
assistants durmg the irrigation season One man was also stationed 
at the forebay of the power plant. The duty of these men was to 
remove as much d6bris and silt from the canal as possible by the 
operation of the sand boxes at those places. 

During the month of April repairs were made to the lower end of 
the wasteway at the power plant and new concrete placed in the bot- 
tom and sides. Large holes caused by erosion were loimd in both the 
upper and lower plunge basins. These holes were filled with con- 
crete and new backfilling put in. Material placed consisted of about 
40 cubic yards of rock backfill and 45 cubic yards of concrete. 

Power plant. — ^The power plant was operated practically without 
interruption during the year, and power supplied under contract to 
the cities of Payson, Spanish Fork, Springviile, and Salem. No. 1 
generator unit was thoroughly overhauled during the year. Exciter 
turbines, wheel, and generator were dismantled and rebuilt. New 
wearing rings, wicket gates, crown plates, and shaft were put in and 
the unit was put in good operating condition. 

Contracts were made during the year between the United States 
and the Mapleton Light & Power Co. and the Springviile Canning Co. 
New contracts were executed with the cities of Spamsh Fork, Payson, 
and Salem in which the rates were increased about 40 per cent. 

Telephone and electric power transmission lines. — ^Repairs were made 
during July, 1918, to the telephone line between the power plant and 
East Portal of Strawberry Tiinnel. 

This line was washed out in several places by the action of water 
from Strawberry Tunnel. It was relocated at a higher elevation and 
altogether 28 new poles were set, 3,500 feet of new wire strung, and 
the line stubbed where required. 

The transmission lines were operated satisfactorily throughout the 
year and the only repairs necessary were stubbing a few poles on the 
bpanish Fork line. 

The present power contracts are as follows: 



Power conlractSf Strawberry Valley project, Utah, 



'ames of oontractors. 



Date of con* 
tracts. 



Spanish Fork City Feb. 5, 1919 

Payson City do 

Springviile rity June 21,1917 

Town of Salem j Feb. 6, 1919 

Map'eton Light & Power Co May 31,1919 

SpringrifierimidngCo ; June 19,191^ 

Joseph Lucas j Feb. 21, 1919 

Denver St Rio Grande R. R (Pending). . . . 



Date of ex- 
piration of 
contracts. 



Feb. 6,1922 

do 

July 26,1920 
Feb. 5, 1922 
May 31,1924 
June 19,1924 
Feb. 21,1922 



Fstlmated 
maximum 
demand. 



Kilowatts. 
150 
120 

• 40 
5 
5 

i 



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320 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

Diamond Fork road, — A comparatively small amoimt of work was 
done during the year on the maintenance of Diamond Fork road. 
By arrangement with the county commissioners, the operation and 
maintenance of the first 12 miles of the road was turned over to Utah 
County. The United States Forest Service and Reclamation Service 
are, cooperatively, maintaining the balance of the road. The county's 
portion at the present time is washed out in several places by the 
action of waters from Strawberry Timnel and extensive repairs must 
be made if the road is to be kept open. 

A new cattle bridge was constructed during the spring of 1919 
across Sixth Water Canyon at a point \\ miles below the West Portal 
rating flume. This bridge was erected to permit cattle to cn)ss the 
river swollen by tunnel waters and heretofore cut off during the irri- 
gation season. 

Lateral system, — ^Lateral 34, of the high-line system was formally 
turned over to the Strawberry High Line Canal Co. by letter from 
theproject manager imder date of February 5, 1919. 

Iiydrometry, — ^The usual hydrometric investigations were carried on 
for the purpose of keeping to date the records of all the streams here- 
tofore measured thiat are connected with the water supply of the 
project. 

Fourteen regular gaging stations were maintained and 1 50 current 
meter measurements made during the year. One hydrographer, with 
automobile, carried on the work during the year and supervised the 
delivery of water to the several units of the project in accordance 
with the demand. 

Investigation of silt condition was also made during the irr^ation 
season of Spanish Fork River and several canals. The results £owed 
a considerable lessening in the amount carried during previous years. 

Farm units. — Approximately 500 new applications for water have 
been received durmg the year, mostly imder the Spanish Fork imit. 
The acceptance of these new applications necessitated the examina- 
tion of as many abstracts of title and the writing of legal opinions as 
to condition of the title at the time of acceptance. 

Water deliveries. — A total of 32,539 acres were irrigated during 
the season of 1918. Of this total about 19,000 acres were imder the 
high-line unit, 10,000 under the Spanish Fork and Lake Shore units, 
and about 3,500 acres under the Mapleton district. 

Approximately 55,242 acre-feet of water were delivered to the 
water users at the headworks of the main canals during the irrigation 
season of 1918. Of this amount the high-line unit used 37,800 acre- 
feet, the Spanish Fork unit 12,415 acre-feet, the Lake Shore imit 
2,011 acre-ieet, and the Mapleton irrigation district 3,016 acre-feet. 

MisceUaneovsworJc. — Some assistance was rendered the Statewater- 
rights board by the project manager and the district counsel in con- 
nection with amendments to the State irrigation district laws and the 
State drainage district laws passed at the last session of the State 
legislature. Coorerative weather reports are kept on the project at 
Provo, Spanish Fork power plant, and East Portal of Strawberry 
Tunnel. 



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UTAH, STRAWBEBBY VAIiLBY PBOJBOT. 821 

ERBIGATION DISTBIOTS AND CITY WATEB SUPPLY. 

Sjninaville irriaation district. — ^This district was duly organized 
unaer the State laws and a contract executed between it and the 
United States under date of December 29, 1917. 

Under this contract the United States agrees to furnish the district 
2,400 acre-fee.t of water annually for irrigation purposes. Also an 
option of 2,000 acre-feet was granted the district to be purchased on 
or before May 1, 1920, at the original contract price. This option 
has not yet been exercised, but the indications are that the district 
may purchase a part of it. 

Jkapleton irrigation district. — ^This district was duly organized 
under the State laws and a contract executed between it and the 
United States under date of January 2, 1918. 

Under this contract the United States furnishes the district 3,600 
acre-feet of water annually for irrigation purposes. An option on 400 
acre-feet was granted the district at the original contract price. 
This option was taken up and a supplemental contract entered into 
under date of April 5, 1919, whereby the district purchased an addi- 
tional 1,108 acre-feet. N^otiations are again in progress for the 
purchase of an additional 500 acre-feet but at an aavanced price. 

Payson Oity. — A contract was executed between Payson Qty and 
the United States of 200 acre-feetfor water for irrigation and domestic 
purposes under the Warren Act. A supplemental contract is pend- 
mg for the purchase of 1,500 acre-feet aaditional. 

Spanish Fork City. — ^A contract was executed between Spanish 
Fork City and the United States imder date of April 28, 1917, tor the 
delivery by the United States of 400 acre-feet of water for imgation 
and domestic purposes under the Warren Act. A supplemental con- 
tract was entered mto under date of August 21, 1918, for the delivery 
of 40 acre-feet additional. 

MisceUaneoiis. --^-CiontrHCts are pending between the landowners 
above the high-line canal near Payson and the United States for 
the purchase by exchange of about 800 acre-feet of water under 
the Warren Act; also about 1,100 acre-feet may be purchased by 
the Saiem Canal & Irrigation Co. 

. The United States at the present time is delivering by exchaage 
imder the Warren Act contracts 998.4 acre-feet to landowners under 
the Clinton, Soldiw Fork, and Diamond Fork units. 

DBAINAaE DISTBICTS. 

OosTien drainage district. — ^No further investigations of this district 
were carried on during the fiscal year. 

Payson Slough drainage district.— On April 9, 1919, a petition waa 
received from landowners in the vicinity of Salem, Payson, and 
Benjamin, representing some 14,000 acres of land, asking that an 
investigation T>e made oy the United States Reclamation Service to 
ascertam the feasibility of draining their lands and the probable cost 
of the drainage works. The drainage engineer from the Denver office 
visited the project on April 27, 1919, and submitted a report to the 
chief of construction under date of April 29. 

1S86M-19 21 



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822 EIGHTEENTH ANKTTAL BEPOBT OF RBCLAMATIOK SBRVICB. 

GBAZINa LANDS. 

Strawberry Valley grazina lands. — ^The 60^60 acres of grazing land 
in Strawberry VaUey, under lease to the Berber Horse and Cattle 
Growers' Association and the Wallaburg live Stock Association, 
supported on an average during the season nearly 13,000 head of 
sheep, cattle, and horses. The water users on the project have sub- 
mitted a request that they be permitted to take over these grazing 
lands at an annual fixed rental charge at the expiration of the present 
lease. 

West MouTiiain grazing land. — On January 18, 1918, 5,250 acres of 
land lying on and along the slopes of West Mountain in T. 8 S., 
R. 1 E.. Salt Lake base and meridian, were leased to Olof G. Peterson 
and Jonn L. Ellertson for $105 per year for 5 years. This land is 
used to lamb sheep on or for grazing sheep and cattle during the early 
spring. 

Ooshen Valley grazing lands. — ^The contract, dated July 17. 1917, 
between certain Goshen individuals and the United States for the 
leasing of 5,600 acres of land for grazing purposes at $1,511 per year 
was canceled for nonpajnnent oi lease price and the land released 
to C. F. Dixon for a period of one year for $325. Just before the 
expiration of this last contract, the previous contractors petitioned 
for reinstatement of their lease oy payment of the difference between 
the two contract prices. This was done and a supplemental contract 
was entered into April 15, 1919, which renewed the old contract in 
the entirety. The following statement shows grazing leases now in 
force: 

Oranng lea$e$, Strawberry Valley project, Utah, 



Strawbeny Valley lands. 

Do 

Ooshen Valley lands 

West Mountain lands 

QoslMn Oun Chib 



Date or lean. 



Jan. 21,1910 

do... 

July 10,1917 
Jan. 18,1918 
Jan. 10,1919 



Date of 

expiration 

or lease. 



Nov. 15,1920 
do. 



May 1,1921 
Feb. 1 1922 
Feb. 1,1024 



Value of 



$10,500 

i73,260 

7,655 

526 

300 



*92,ia0 



Acrea^ 
of lease. 



8,320 
51,810 
5,600 
5)250 
l,818w58 



72,828.58 



1 Bebates aggregate about $12,130 for land oovered by Strawberry Besenrdr. 
• Estlmated^t valuea of leasee iao,OOa 



BOABD OF ENGINEE&S. 



A board of engineers, comprised of Messrs. C. T. Pease and James 
Munn, convened at Provo, May 31, 1919, to consider certain claims 
set forth in a petition of the board of directors of the Mapleton and 
Springville imgation districts. 



SETTLEHENT. 



There is on the project practically no Grovemment land susceptible 
of irrigation mider existing units. The Grovemment land opened for 
entry Jime 20, 1917, has been all entered, except four smaU isolated 
tracts. The present irrigation season has been extremely hot and 



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UTAH, STBAWBEBBY VALLEY PROJECT. 



828 



dry but the prospect for an abundant crop of fruit, hay, and grain 
is excellent. The dry spring damaged the starting of the sugar beets 
and a part of the acreage had to be replanted; however, indications 
point to an average yield in spite of this. 

The new sugar beet factory at Springville was in operation during 
the fall and handled about 28,000 tons of beets. Three new pea 
viner stations have been put in at various places on the project and 
have had a stimulating effect on the cultivation of peas. 

A new alfalfa mill is m the process of erection at Spanish Fork City. 

The summer run-off of the Spanish Fork River is the lowest in 20 
years and practically all crops are depending upon the use of stored 
water from Strawberry Reservoir this season. 

Cwp report^ Strawberry Valley project^ Utah, year of 1918. 



Crop. 



Area 

(acres). 



Unit of 
yield. 



TiddB. 



Total. 



Average 
per acre. 



Values. 



Pertmit 
ol yield. 



Total. 



Per acre. 



AUtJia 

Alfal&seed. 



Barley 

Beans 

Beets, sugar 

Clover hay 

Clover seed 

Com 

Com fodder 

Com ensilage 

Cherries 

Garden 

Grapes 

Hay 

Oats 

Pasture 

Peaches 

Potatoes 

Prunes 

Sorghum 

Tomatoes 

Wheat 

Less duplicated areas. 



7,882 

31 

78 

633 

86 

6,273 

26 

90 

436 

15 

26 

20 

147 

1 

648 

1,768 

1,783 

213 

431 

1 

20 

88 

10,244 

2 



Ton 

Bushel.. 
Pound., 
Bushel.. 
..do.... 

Ton 

...do...., 
Bushel., 
..do...., 

Ton 

...do.... 
Pound., 



18,061 

41 

361,700 

22.613 

687 

60,524 

74 

023 

0,088 

79 

262 

184,800 



2.4 

1.3 

4,635.0 

42.6 

6.9 
11.6 

2.8 
10.2 
20.8 

6.2 

10.0 

9,240.0 



818.00 

10.60 

.025 

1.44 

6.00 

10.00 

20.00 

10.50 

1.35 

6.00 

16.00 

.09 



Pound. 

Ton 

Bushel. 



6,000 

743 

63,763 



5,000.0 

1.14 

30.4 



.09 

15.00 

1.00 



Pound. 
Bushel. 
Pound. 
Ton...., 
Bushel. 
..do... 



1,482,000 

49,947 

6,000 

139 

10,447 

233,000 



6,715.0 

116.0 

6,000.0 

7.0 

276.0 

22.7 



1.00 

.08 

16.00 

.46 

1.80 



8341,298 

430 

9,042 

32,563 

3,522 

606,240 

1,480 

9,092 

12,269 

895 

3,922 

16,632 

6,995 

450 

11,145 

68,763 

14,225 

42,987 

49,947 

150 

2,079 

4,701 

419,400 



$43.80 
13.96 
116.91 
61.38 
40.96 
114.78 
67.00 
107.60 
28.16 
26.33 
160.00 
831.60 
47.60 
450.00 
17.65 
30.40 
7.08 
201.60 
116.10 
150.00 
104.00 
123.60 
41.03 



Total cropped acreage. 



Summer fallowed 

Irrigated, no crop , 

Total irrigated acreage 



29,788 



2,488 
263 



Total and average. 



1,642,827 



66.13 



Anas. 



32,630 



Total irrigable liarms reported . . . 
Total irrigated fiurms reported 

Under water-right applications. 

Under rental contracts... 

Total cropped area farms reported. . 



Aeres. 



35,000 
32,689 
29,039 
3,500 
29,788 



Number 
liarms. 



Percent 
of project. 



1,200 
1,100 
1,000 
100 
1,000 



70.0 
66.0 
68.0 
7.0 
59.6 



PXJBLIO NOTICES AND OBDEBS. 

PUBLIC NOTICE. 

Mabch 11, 1919. 
1. In pursuance of section 4 of the reclamation act of June 17, 
1902 (32 Stat., 388), and acts amendatory thereof or supplementary 
thereto, particularly the reclamation extension act of August 13. 
1914 (38 Stat., 686), announcement of the annual operation and 
maintenance charges in the irrigation season of 1919 and thereafter 



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824 EIGHTEENTH ANIHJAIi BEPOBT OF EEGLAMATIOK SEBYIGE. 

until further notice, for all lands of the Spanish Fork, Lake Shore 
and high-line units of the Strawberry Valley project, Utah, under 
public notice, is hereby made as follows: 

2. Spanish Fork and Lake Shore nnits. — ^The minimum annual 
operation and maintenance charge for the Spanish Fork and Lake 
Snore Units shall be 50 cents per uxigable acre whether water is used 
or not, which charge will entitle the water user to not more than 1 
acre-foot of water per irrigable acre and in no event to more than 
the amount per acre specified in the water-right application; and for 
all additional water a charge of 50 cents per acre-foot will be made; 
provided, that no additionid water wiU be f mnished to any water user 
who has not made water-right application for at least 2 acre-feet of 
water per irrigable acre for all irrigable land owned by him. 

3. High-line unit. — ^The minimum annual operation and mainte- 
nance charge for the high-line unit shall be $1 per irrigable acre 
whether water is used or not, which charge will entitle the water user 
to not more than 2 acre-feet of water per irrigable acre; and for all 
additional water a charge of 50 cents per acre-foot will be made; 
provided that no additional water will oe furnished to any water 
user who has not made water-right application for at least 2 acre-feet 
•of water per irrigable acre for fill imgable land owned by him. The 
terms and conditions both as to amount and place of measurement 
for delivery of water shall be the same for public lands included in the 
public notice of May 21, 1917, as for all other lands under this unit, 
namely, the delivery of 2 acre-feet per acre measured at the head ot 
the high-line canal. 

4. Time of payment. — All operation and maintenance charges will 
be due and payable on December 1 of each year for the preceding 
irrigation season, except that all charges for water additional to the 
aihount specified in the water-right application are payable in 
advance when the water is ordered. 

S. G. Hopkins, 
Assistant Secretary of the Interior. 

FINANOIAL STATEMENT. 

Condensed balance sheet. Strawberry Valley project, June SO, 1919, 

Cash $9,081.77 

Inventory of materials and supplies on hand.. 22,056.91 

Accounts receivable: 

Current accounts receivable $13,302.09 

Construction water-right contracts unaccrued 2,409,35a 49 



2,482,713.86 
1,75a 00 



Construction work contracted: 

Contract obligations. I,50a00 

UndeUvored ordws. 25a 00 

Gross construction cost *. 8,506,005.78 _ 

Less construction revenue earnings. $8,301.77 

Add cost adjustments 17,992.81 

26,294.58 

Net construction cost 8,479,709.14 

Gross operation and maintenance cost 103,211.71 

Less operation and maintenance revenue earnings 8,673.54 

94,588.17 

Accounts payable 8,472.74 

Contingent obligations 10,831.77 

Collections and contracts of specific amounts for repayments to reclamation fund 2,659,516.66 

Klscellaneous revenues. 63,413.60 

Capital Investment: 

Disbursement, transfer, and Joint construction vouchers received 3,908, 218. 17 

Collection, transfer, refund, and joint construction vouchers issued 555, 603. 22 

Net investment 8,852,612.95 



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UTAH, STRAWBBREY VALLEY PEO JBOT. 
Feature easts of Strawberry VaUey project. 



325 



Features. 



Fiscal year 
1919. 



Total to 

June 30, 

1919. 



Examination and sunreys, project as a wbole: 

Reconnoissance 

Trial lines.. 



t268.21 



Topography 

Sou surveys. 

Water ri^ta 

Experimental investigations. 

Bobdivisions 

Cross sections 

Locations 

Farmonits 

Triangulation 

Level control 

Hydrometry 



$5,696.40 

1,067.89 

11,775.74 

362.76 

12,184.82 

1,617.94 

321.62 

12.16 

6.06 

18.96 

68.16 

41.48 

15,684.29 



Storage system: 

Strawberry Dam 

Wasteway at Strawberry Dam , 

Bridge over wasteway at Strawberry Dam , 

Sluicing tunnel at Strawberry Dam ♦. , 

Indian Creek Dike 

Indian Creek and Trail Hollow diversion canals and bridge... 

Indian Creek and Trail Hollow intake and spillway 

Indian Creek and Trail HoUow terminal drop and chute. . . .. 

Strawberry Tunnel controlling works and int^e , 

Strawberry Tunnel proper 

Strawberry Tunnel outlet weir , 

ICeasuring flume at west portal of Strawberry Tunnel 

Permanent camp at east portal of Strawberry Tunnel 

Submerged lands (stonge reservoir) 



268.21 



'48,658.27 



1457.11 

1 161. 66 

125.47 

» 135. 77 

1341.33 

1202.55 

162.54 

162.22 

1282.68 

13,014.32 

129.86 

I2ai9 

123.87 



169,242.90 

66,314.99 

8,869.71 

47,296.48 

118,908.59 

70,562.11 

21,783.41 

21,672.65 

98,474.68 

1,060,546.49 

10,398.68 

7,032.15 

8,312.78 

io,ooaoo 



Canal system: 

Mam distribution and power canal— 

Spanish Fork Reservoir and River improvement. .. 

Spanish Fork divenion dam 

Spanish Fork River bridge at diversion dam , 

Permanent camp at Spamah Fork divenion dam... 

Canal excavation. 

Canal concrete linLog 

Canal aqueduct. 

Culvert at station 139 

Concrete arch and beam and slab covering , 

Tunnel No. 1, power canal 

TunnelNo. 2, power canal 

Minor struotuTflt, timber , 

Minor structures, concrete. , 

Wasteway, sandbox, and inlet chamber 



14,849.57 



1,699,416.52 



10,375.49 

89,695.90 

2,524.60 

6,812.71 

143,638.31 

42,659.60 

13,052.00 

2,584.20 

88,830.29 

27,606.23 

21,852.22 

8,263.33 

1,634.76 

24,75a 02 



High Line Canal: 

E T a m i n a ti op and surveys 

Headworks 

Canal excavation 

Canal lining, concrete 

Tunnel No. 1, high-line canal 

Peteetneet siphon , 

Peteetneet mlet dun 

State road bridge, concrete 

Siphon under San Pedro, Los Angeles & Salt Lake R. R.. 

Notch drop and chute, Ooshen Pass 

Siphon under Denver dc Rio Grande R. R., Ooshen Pass.. 

Spillwav at head of lateral 83 

Flume 9-foot concrete near power house and Payson Hill . 

Flume ft-foot concrete, near Ooshen Pass , 

Flume, double-barrel, covered, concrete , 

Turnouts with checks , 

Minor structures, concrete , 

.Minor structures, timber 

Turnout No. 9 and bridge No. 6 , 

Turnout No. 80 and measuring device , 

Minor structures, pipe , 

Flume, wood, division 2, near Salem 

Turnout No. 3 (division 1) , 



879,279.76 



Total canal system. 



38,835.41 

4,364.36 

148,342.34 

108,465.67 

8,824.12 

7,915.83 

1,955.66 

2,069.93 

3,946.00 

561.80 

1,824.70 

1,510.60 

44,706.18 

5,361.51 

13,889.72 

3,778.34 

4,794.22 

19,120.28 

1,687.67 

4,137.73 

4,992.58 

1,334.30 

3,007.26 



435,426.20 



814,706.96 

1 CreditB shown cover adjustment of charges previously made to cover frei^^t and handling of eqiiipment 
MMlomised materials punmased for the construction of the storage systeni. no costs charged to this feature 
during fiscal year 1919. 



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326 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL BEPOBT OF BEGLAMATION SERYICXB. 
Feature cosU of Strawberry VdUey ;>r(>/ect— Continued. 



Features. 



Fiscal year 
1910. 



Total to 

June 80, 

1919. 



Lateral systems: 

IHvisions 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9— 

Examination and surveys 

Lateral excavation 

Laterallining, concrete 

Hetal flume, 3 feet 2| inches 

Metal flume, 3 feet 9| inches 

Siphon, 30 mches, steel, lateral No. 8 

Siphon, 36 inches, cast Iron, lateral No. 30 

State road siphon and turnout Xo. ao 

Siphon under San Pedro, Los Angeles & Salt Lake R. B^ 24 inches, 
cast iron and vitrified pipe, lateral 28 , 

Siphon under Denver dc Kto Grande B. B. and turnout No. 20 P. & Q., 
86-inch cast iron pipe , 

Siphon under San Pedro, Los Angeles Sc Salt Lake R. R., 30-inch cast- 
iron pipe, lateral 20-R 

Siphon, 18 inches, vitrified pipe, lateral 27 , 

Siphon, state r(»a and turnout do-CD 

Mmor structures, concrete 

Minor structures, timber 

Minor structures, pipe .'. 

Minor structures, metal 



Division 10— 

I^ateral excavation 

Lateral concrete canal lining 

Metal flumes, Nos. 1,3, and 12, 3 feet 2^ inches 

Metal flumes, Nos. 4, 5, and 6, 5 feet 8! inches 

Metal flumes, Nos. 7, 8. 9, 10. and 11, 4 feet 51 inches 

Metal flume, No. 13, 1 foot 11 inches 

Measuring boxes, concrete for turnouts 32-EF and 32^D.. 
"" ' on, 36 inches, steel, lateral 31 

Eline, double-barrel, 24-inch vitrified pipe, lateral 31... 
erts, 24-inch vitrified pipe, lateral 31 

Culverts, state road and turnout 31-E2 

Minor structures, concrete 

Minor structures, timber 

Minor structures, pipe 



Mapleton lateral- 
Preliminary surveys 

Lateral excavation 

Lateral lining, concrete 

Headworks, Intake at Power Canal 

Siphon over Spanish Fork River, concrete, 46 inches 

Siphon imder Denver & Rio Grande R. R., concrete, 46 inches. 

Siphon over Hobble Creek, concrete, 27 inches 

Minor structures, concrete 

Minor structures, pipe 

Minor structures, timber 

Minor structives, metal 



$8,095.01 

431.29 

50.99 

90.01 

617.83 

21,193.40 

6,840.41 

155.66 

3,692.01 

1,373.16 



41,639.77 



Total lateral systems. 



41,539.77 



Power svstem: 

Hydroelectric power plant 

Penstock 

Substation at Springvllle 

Transmission lines to Spanish Fork . 
Transmission lines to Payson City... 

Transmission lines to Springville 

Power house permanent camp 



Farm units 

Permanent improvements: 

Diamond Fork wagon road 

Prove office and grounds 

Strawberry Valley grazing lands. 



$37,262.88 

82,482.71 

191,056.52 

2,180.87 

1,088.47 

8,899.07 

811.77 

006.58 

4,164.85 

1,113.74 

816.76 
1,645.77 
1,199.48 

47,213.05 
2,766.68 

20,666.00 
1,634.41 



350,76L06 



35,289.93 

104,652.31 

3,355.31 

2,892.36 

22,150.99 
1,614.62 
1,502.01 
6,780.92 
5,264.83 
3,940.40 
1,218.22 

17,641.50 
2,196.60 
9,488.84 



217,988.03 

2,734.81 

61,136.76 

997.90 

2,319.88 
16,860.91 

6,487.38 
21,718.82 

9,314.01 
\»48.33 

5,499.04 

2,768.52 



130,195.31 



608,945.30 



36,279.74 
8,241.18 
3,479.64 
3,556.85 
6,810.27 
6,601.80 

15,328.18 



80,297.11 



9,025.68 



48,877.00 
5,260.00 
61,085.66 



116,228.25 



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TJTAH, STBiLWBBBBY VALLBT FBOJEOT. 327 

Ftaturt ooiti of Strawberry VaUqf pro/ecto— Continued. 



Features. 



Fiscal vear 
1919. 



Total to 

June 30, 

1919. 



Telephone system: Line from Spanish Fork to Strawbeny Dam. 

Operation and maintenance during oonstmction 

Total cost of oonstruetion features 

Balance in plant account. 



$14,061.19 



12,5ir.9(r 



$36,958.41 



8,492,834.17 
13,169.56 



Gross coostruction cost to June 30, 1919.. 



36,958.41 



3,506,008.73 



Less revenues earned during construction period: 

Rental of buildings 

Bfflital of gnudnguid fisrnilng hmds 

Net power losses (prior to public notice) 

Renul of irrijAtion water 

Bental of telephone and tolls 

Contractors' freight reftinds 

Loss on hospital operation ; 

Bevenues, miscellaneous 



169.10 
215.54 



5,675.80 

45,664.56 

126,145.19 

400.00 

1,818.82 

69L61 

12,626.56 

215.54 



384.64 



26,294.58 



Net construction cost, June 30, 1919. 



86,573.77 



3,479,709.15 



1 Deduct. 

Statement ofooett by calendar yearty Strawberry VaUey project. 





Construction. 








During 
oonstrue- 
tion. 


Under 
public 
notice. 


Total. 


Total tx>8t. 


Year ending Dec 31— 

1907 


$358,107.73 
260,775.83 
200,684.80 
234,577.02 
538,013.86 
772,500.84 

11,870.02 

5,733.63 

746,220.44 

194,074.66 

48,987.28 
126,370.73 

12,863.43 








$358,107.73 
260,776.88 
200,684.80 
234,577.02 

538,013.86 


1908 








1909 








1910 








1911 








1912 








772,500.84 
1 1,870.02 
75;i64:5I 

758,322.98 

151,423.71 
79,685.00 

155,163.60 
14,497.23 


1913 








1914 


$60,420.68 

3,779.23 

160,688.01 




$60,420.68 
12,102.54 

142,650.95 
80,697.72 
28,792.96 
17,360.66 


1915 


$8,323.31 
18,037.06 
30,697.72 
28,792.96 
17,360.66 


1916 


1917 


1918 




Jan. 1 to June 80. 1910 










Subtotal 


3,480,822.27 
13,169.56 


12,511.00 


103,21L71 


115,723.61 


3,506,045.88 
13,169.56 


Plant accounts to June 30, 1919 










Total 


3,403,401.83 


12,511.00 


103,211.71 


115,723.61 


3,609,215.J4 





1 Deduct. 

Note.— The project was opened under public notice! n 1915, and the appropriate costs for operation and 
maintenance under public notice were opened and taken out of operation and maintenance during con* 
struction. 

The above operation and maintenance cost of $28,799.96, shown for calendar year 1918, inchides an adjust- 
ment of $2,298.05 made in June, 1918, between power system operation and maintenance costs and irrigation 
operation and maintenance costs, in accordance with the plans set forth in the board of engineers' report, 
dated Mar. 16, 1918. The true cost for calendar year 1918 fe $26,494.91. 

The true construction cost for the period from Jan. 1 to June 30, 1919, is $1,986.14. The amount shown 
<$2,863.43-<;redit) covers the difference between the true cost for this period and an adjustment mada 
during this period of the storage system costs. (See Feature costs— storage system.) 



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828 EIGHTEENTH ANKUAL BEPOBT OF BECLAIIATION SEBVIOE. 
StatemerU ofcoiU byJUoal yean. Strawberry Vtdky project. 





ConstniotioiL 


Operation and maintenance. 






During 

construcy 

Uon. 


Under 
public 
notice. 


Total. 


Total ooat. 


Year ending Jane 30— 

ig06 


$45,409.35 

88,401.94 

292,288.51 

287,815.86 

193,766.85 

306,lia46 

691,590.78 

381,828.93 

52,519.18 

380,975.33 

377,203.63 

260,762.18 

75,690.86 

36,958.41 








$45,409.86 
88 401.94 
292,288.51 
287,815.86 
193,766.85 
306,110.46 
091,600.78 
381,828.93 
103,212.22 


ig07 , 






,....,...,.. 


1908 








1909 








1910 








1911 








1912 ^ 









1913! I!1I 








1914 * 


$50,093.04 

28,165.77 

7,180.11 

173,527.02 




$50,093.04 

28,165.77 

7,180.11 

187,021.96 
35,064.62 
31,642.02 


1915 




418,141.10 
384,383.74 
223,740.23 


1916 




1917., 


$36,505.07 
35,064.62 
31,642.02 


1918 


110,755.48 
68,600.43 


1919 








SabtotaL 


3,480,322.27 
13,169.56 


12,511.90 


103,211.71 


115,723.61 


3,596,045.88 
13;i60.56 


Plant accounts to June 30, 1919 








Total 


3,493,491.83 


12,511.90 


103,211.71 


115,723.61 


3,609,215.44 





1 Deduct. 

Note.— The project was opened under public notice in 1915, and the appropriate costs for operation and 
maintenance under public notice were opened and taken out of the operation and maintenance during 
ooostruotion. 

Eetimated coet of eontemplated toorh. Strawberry Valley project, during fiical year 19t0, 



Principal feature. 



Estimated 
cost. 



Ezamination and surveys: Preliminary investigations of proposed extension of canal into 

JuabOounty , 

Lateral system: Final settlement of contract with Green Construction Co 

Operation and maintenance under public notice , 

EeimburBable accounts 

Total 



$3,409.78 
4,551.43 

30,000.00 
7,200.00 



45,161.21 



Operating ooets and reventte, Strawberry Valley project, to Dec. 31, 1918 


• 




i>i«n#^fiy yetr 1918. 


To end of calendar year 1918. 


Features. 


"^ 


Mainte- 
nance. 


TotaL 


Opera- 
tion. 


Mainte- 
nance. 


Total. 


COSTS. 

Storage system: 

Strawberry Dam 


$2,438.76 

34a 76 

92.32 

92.33 

2,521.32 


$93.35 


$2,532.11 

34a 76 

92.32 

92.33 

4,48L51 


$4,258.02 

1,293.50 

l,0iai2 

977.87 

5,443.39 


$6,071.46 

779.60 

373.76 

186.69 

2,914.80 

22.40 


$10,329.48 
2,073.19 
1,380.88 
1,164.56 
8, 858.19 
22.40 


Indian Creek Dike 


Indian Creek feeder canal. 




Trail HoUow feeder canal 


"i,*96ai9' 


West portal weir 














Total storage system.. 


5,485.49 


2,053.54 


7,539.03 


12,988.99 


10,348.71 


28,337.7© 




Canal system: 

Higb-Une canal 








569.34 

68.95 

I25w86 

1.106.24 


4a 02 

2,821.68 
8,073.04 
l,50a28 


009136 


Watercourse between Straw- 
berry Tunnel and Spanish 
ForJr diversion dam. . ........ x 


6.00 


98&87 


994.87 


2,89a6S 
3,198.90 
3,696.62 


West portal measuring flume... 


Spanish Fork division dam .... 


86a63 


i8i.76 


i,6iii9 



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UTAH, STBAWBEBBY VAU^Y FBOJEOT. 329 

Operating co$i$ and revenue, Strawberry Valley project, to Dee. 31, 191^— Continued. 





Calendar year 1918. 


To end of calendar year 1918. 


Featnrea. 


Opera- 
Uon. 


Maint.- 
nanoe. 


Total. 


Opera- 
tion. 


Miiinte- 
nanoe. 


Total. 


cosTft-Continuod. 

Oaoal system— Gontiiiaed. 

Main distribution and power 
canal 


I658./W 


$402.48 


fl,06LO7 


$4,468.94 


$3,961.43 


$8, 43a 87 






Total canal system 


1,526.22 


1,678.11 


3,098.83 


6,339.33 


11,486.46 


17,825.78 






Lateral system: 

Hl?h-iinA canal latrerals. ......... 








279.35 
443.87 


32.71 
1,644.83 


812.06 


Mapleton lateral 


443.87 


1,644.83 


2,088.70 


2,088.70 






Total lateral svstem. 


443.87 


1,644.83 


2,08&70 


723.22 


1,677.54 


2,40a76 






UndJstribated expenses: 

Teleptione system* .» 


463.71 
667.79 

1,392.83 
172.72 

6,387.31 


64.48 

176.27 

383.71 

63.28 

1,306.90 


518.19 
744.06 

1,776.64 
238.00 

6,784.21 


2,029.98 
992.37 

1,539.13 
210.33 

6,969.21 


1,77L62 
866.00 

1,443.16 
100.90 

5,677.44 


8,801.60 


f^amp maintenance 


1,858.37 


Superintendence and accounts. . 

Engineering and inspection 

Qeneral expense 


2,982.28 

311.23 

12,646.66 






Total, undistributed expenses. 


7,984.36 


2,074.64 


10,059.00 


11,741.02 


9,750.11 


21,60ai8 


ICisoellaneous features: 

Hydrometry 


3,428.18 
267.49 




8,428.18 

267.49 

14.23 


12,484.31 
1,843.16 




12,484.81 

1,843.16 

6,866.20 

92.92 


Operation and maintenance sur- 
veys and investigations 

Maintenance of Diamond Fork 
road 






14.23 


6,866.29 
92.92 


Maintenance of Diamond Fork 
road bridges... ' 


















Total, miscellaneous features . . 


3,696.62 


14.23 


3,709.86 


14,827.47 


6,459.21 


20,786.69 


Grand total 


19,184.66 


7,860.36 


26,494.91 


46,120.03 


39,731.02 


85,85L06 




BEVENTnCS. 

accrued on contracts with the 
vrntpr-rierht Annllcants 






25, 04a 43 
2.77 

96.05 

65L50 
8,508.00 

66l12 
1,161.20 

197L68 






64,126.00 
8.17 


Operation and znaintenanoe charges 
paid in advance by water-right 
applicants 










Pmalties on operation and main- 
tenance charges accrued on con- 
tracts with water-rifi^t applicants. 

Rental of land and buildings during 
ontfation neriod. 










19a 68 










1,786.00 
4,813.89 

411. 17 


Rental of irrigation water 










Rental of telephone and tolls dur- 
ing operation period 










Re'vinues, miscellaneous 










1,16L20 
12,616.45 


Less discount allowed on operation 

on contracts with the water-right 
EDPlicantfl (contra). 




















Total 






20,441.44 
2,046.53 






09,03&61 


Difference: 

Excess 










Deficit 










16,916.44 


^ ^ 1 




1 





1 Deduct. 

KOTE.— The operation and maintenance deficit was reduced by nearly $8,000 during the irrigation year 
of 1918. Considerable more water has been sold during the present irrlgatioB season, and it is estimated 
that this deficit will be eliminated by the end of the 1919 irrigation year. 



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WASHnrOTOH, oeahooah pboject* 

Calvin Castbbl, project manager, Okanogan, Wash. 

LOCATION. 

County: Okanogan. 

Townehipe: 33 to 34 N., Ra. 26 to 27 E., Willamette meridian. 
Railroad: Great Northern (branch line). 

Railroad stations. and estimated population, June 30, 1919: Okanogan, 1,200; 
Omak, 600; Riverside, 250. 

WATER SX7PPLY. 

Source of water supply: Salmon Creek. 
Area of drainage basm: 121 square miles above Conconully Dam. 
Annual run-on in acre-feet of Salmon Creek at Jones ranch, near Okanogan (140 
square miles), 1903 to 1918, mayimum 56,500, minimum 7,639, mean 31,885. 

AOBICTJLTT7BAL AND OLIHATIO CONDITIONS. 

Area for which service is prepared to supply water, season of 1919 : 10,099. 

Area under water-right applications, rental and vested water-right contracts to 
June 30, 1919: 10,099. 

Length of irrigation season, May 1 to September 1: 122 days. 

Average elevation of irrigable area: 1,000 feet above sea level. 

RainffiJl on irrigable area: At Omak, Wash., 9-year average, 11.83 inches; 1918, 
10.25 inches. At Conconully, Wash., at base of Salmon River watershed, 19-year 
average, 15.16 inches; 1918^ 11.74 inches. 

Range of temperature on irrigable area: —10® to 105® F. 

Chanki;er of soil of irrigable area: Volcanic ash and gravel on upper benches and 
sand and gravel on lowlands along Okanogan River. 

Principal products: Fruit, hay, grain, and vegetables. 

Principal markets: States east. 

LANDS OPENED FOB IBItlOATION. 

Dates of public notices and orders: November 12, 1908; March 12, 1910; April 8, 
1910; February 23, 1911; March 28, 1911; April 29, 1912: July 6, 1912; March 10, 
1913; June 16, 1913: January 16 and September 24, 1914; March 20, May 15, and 
July 28, 1915; March 16, 1916; April 18, 1917; March 19 and May 18, 1918; August 
29, 1918: September 10, 1918- April 26, 1919. 

Location of lands opened: Tps. 33 and 34 N., Rs. 25 to 27 E., Willamette meridian. 

Limit of area of farm units: Public, 40 acres; private, 40 acres. 

Duty of water: 2} acre-feet per acre per annum at the farm. 

Bdilding charge per acre of irrigable land: $95, subject of credit of $16 per acre in 
certain cases where landowners constructed and operate and maintain their own 
ditches. 

Annual operation and maintenance charge: Effective for the season of 1919, and 
thereafter until further notice, by public notice dated April 26, 1919, the annual 
operation and maintenance charge is a minimum of $4 per irrigable acre, whether 
water is used thereon or not, wmch entitles the water user to 1 acre-foot of water 
delivered at his land, additional water being furnished at the rate of $1.50 for the 
first acre-foot and all further supply at $3 per acre-foot. Durine the flood period 
of each year each water user will be charged with only two-thirds of the water delivered 
to him. 

CHBONOLOGIOAL SDHMABY. 

Reconnoissance and preliminary surveys be|^:un in 1903. 
Construction recommended by board of engmeers, October 9, 1905. 
Construction authorized by Secretary, December 2, 1905. 

d30 



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WASHINGTON, OKANOGAN PBOJEOT. 381 

First iiriffation by Reclamation Service, season of 1908. 
ConconuUv Dam completed August, 1910. 

Water surface in Conconully Reservoir, reached spillway crest for first time on 
May 19, 1914. 
Power and pumping system completed, 1916. 

Concrete lining of canals and extension of distribution system completed, 1917. 
Third unit opened, 1917. 

Supplemental construction approved, November, 1918. 
Project 75 per cent completed, June 30, 1919. 

ntBIGATION PLAN. 

The irrigation j)lan of the Okanogan project provides for the storage of water in 
Conconully Reservoir and Salmon Lake Keeervoir, controlled by Conconully Dam on 
Salmon Creek, about 2 miles below Conconully, Wash., and Salmon Lake Dam on 
Salmon Lake, about 1 mile above Conconully Wash.; the control of Salmon Lake Res- 
ervoir by a short feeder canal from Salmon Creek and outlet works; the control of 
ConconiUly Reservoir by means of an outlet tunnel discharging into Salmon Creek 
below the storage dam; the diversion of water from Salmon Creek by a dam about 12 
miles below the reservoir into a canal system watering lands in the valley of the 
Okanogan River between Riverside and Okanogan, Wa^.; the operation of a pump- 
ing plant to supplement the gravity supply of the project by pumping from tne 
Okanogan River to approximately 1,050 acres of land on the sandy portion of the 
project known as Robinson Flat, where the duty of water is less than on the heavier 
soils. The power for the pumping is generated by two power plants constructed at 
drops Nos. 1 and 2 on the upper main lateral and transmitted to the pumping station 
near the town of Omak, Wash., by 5^ miles of transmission line. This pumping plant 
is to be operated only during the years when the gravity supply of water will not be 
sufficient. An oil-engine pumping plant was installed at Duck Lake during the 
season of 1918 to supplement tne water supply for about 640 acres of project lands 
near this lake. 

The features of the project, covered by original construction, consisting of the 
inlet and outlet works, Salmon Lake, Conconully hydraulic filled dam, spillway^ 
and outlet works, the diversion weir, and distribution system, are completed and have 
been in use during irrigation seasons since 1910. The features of the project covered 
by supplemental construction, consisting of Salmon Lake Reservoir and Duck Lake 
pumping plant, are now in the course of construction. 

BTTlOiABY OF GENEBAL DATA FOB OKANOGAN PBOJECT TO END 
OF FISCAL YEAB 1010. 

Areas: 

Irrigable acreage when project is complete 10, 099 

Private land 10, 099 

Acreage service could have supplied in season of 1918 10, 099 

Estimated acreage service can supply in season of 1919 10, 099 

Estimated acreage service can supply in season of 1920 10, 099 

Acreage irrigatea season of 1918 6, 402 

Acreage cropped under irrigation season of 1918 5, 287 

Crops: 

Value of irrigated crops season of 1918 $749, 982. 00 

Value of irrigated crops per acre cropped |14L 85 

Finances: 

Net construction cost to June 30, 1919 $892, 845. 36 

Per cent completed on June 30, 1919 75 

Appropriated for fiscal year 1920 |325, 000. 00 

Estimated per cent complete by June 30, 1920 90 

Proposed appropriation for fiscal vear 1921 $196, 000. 00 

Estimated per cent complete by June 30, 1921 100 

Announced construction charges per acre $95.00 

Appropriation fiscal year 1919 '. $154, 000. 00 

Miscellaneous collection and transfers $4, 681. 13 

Increased compensation 3, 605. 99 

162,287.12 



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S32 EIGHTEENTH AKNUAL REPOBT OF BECLAMATIOK SEBYIOE. 

Finances — Continued. 

Expenditures chargeable to 1919 appropriation — 

Disbursements $116, 826. 89 

Transfers 9, 080. 38 

Ciurent liabilities 21, 529. 15 

Contingent liabilities 443. 00 

$146, 879. 42 

Unencumbered balance on July 1, 1919 15, 407. 70 



Repayments: 

Value of construction water-right contracts 812, 014. 02 

Construction charges — 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 34, 130. 06 

Collected to June 30, 1919 31, 569. 75 



Uncollected on June 30, 1919 . 



2,560.31 



Operation and maintenance chai^ges (public notice) — 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 70, 71L 26 

Collected to June 30, 1919 47, 960. 9$ 

Uncollected on June 30, 1919 22, 750. 28 



Water-rental charge 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 108, 314. 57 

Collected to June 30, 1919.. 104,292.75 

UncoUected on June 30, 1919 4, 021. 82 



Power charge 

Accrued to June 30, 1919.. 
Collected to June 30, 1919 . 



1, 754. 71 
1, 754. 71 



CONSTBTJCTION DTTBING THE FISCAL YEAB. 



All features of original contemplated work had practically been 
completed at the dose of the fiscal year 1917. 

Supplemental constniction, storage system. — ^The enlargement of 
Conconully Dam and the construction of Sabnon Lake Dam were 
begun in December, 1018, and were in progress at the end of the 
fiscal year. 

Supplemental construction, pumping for irrigation. — ^An oil engine 

Eumping plant was installed durmg the summer of 1918 at Duck 
lake. Only a temporary building was erected, to be replaced later 
by a permanent structure. 

SEEPAGE AND DKAINAGE. 

Drainage has not been necessary on the Okanogan project with 
two or t&ee exceptions on small areas. Because of the smallness 
of these areas and the improbability of any further damage resulting 
from seepage no steps have been taken by the service to do any 
drainage work. 

BOABD MEETINGS. 



Date. 


T(^c. 


Personnel. 


Aug. 9,1919 


Increased water sopply 


Ferd Bonstedt, Jas. M. Qaylord, John 8. 

Longwell, J. L. Savage. 
D. 0. Henny, A. J. Wiley, Ferd Bonstedt, 

Calvin Casteel. 
James Munn, D. C. Henny, L. V. Branch, 

Ferd Bonstedt, Calvin Casteel. 


Sept. 14-19, 1919 

Nov. 6-9, 1919 


Salmon Lake Dam ocmstruction. . . 
do 







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WASHINGTON, OKANOGAN PBOJEOT. 838 

OPBBATION AND HAINTBNANCB. 

The early winter of 1918 promised a shortage of water for the 
season because of the lack of snow in the moxintains. The water 
shortage became evident early in the season when the nm-oflf in 
Salmon Creek did not pick up to the usual flood proportions. 

The water shortage made necessafy emergency measures to 
secure more water for the project lands, and two large pumping 
plants were accordingly installed for pimipine additional water, 
one at Conconully to pump from Salmon Lake Reservoir below 
the ffate sill into Conconully Reservoir and the other to pxmip from 
Duck Lake into the upper main lateral. These plants were com- 

?leted in July and Augiist and were both set to work immediately, 
he Conconiuly plant delivers about 25 second-feet and the Duck 
Lake plant 10 second-feet. 

The extreme shortage of water made necessary the delivery of 
water in rotation heads and then to cut the water oflf for some time. 
The subscribed water-right lands were delivered only 0.58 acre- 
foot during the season from the project canals. Manv farmers 
secured a uu^r delivery by pxunping water from wells, lakes, and 
springs. 

The nm-oflf for 1918 amoimted to 7,639 acre-feet, 1,851 more 
was pumped from Salmon Lake, and 280 additional acre-feet from 
Duck Lake, making a total of 9,770 acre-feet available for all lands. 
The rainfall was also short for tlie season, all of the shortage occur- 
ring during the spring months. 

The crops for the season of 1918 were not nearly so large as thev 
would have been if the water had not been short. Notwithstand- 
ing, the returns to the project farmers were excellent and amounted 
to over $141 per acre for the area cropped. These crop returns were 
on fruit principally, as all other crops were sacrificed to save the 
fruit trees. 

Some damage was done to trees on the project, but in no instances 
were the losses lai^ to any one farmer. The alfalfa was badly 
injured in many cases. 

The winter of 1918-19 promised a much better water supply than 
that of 1918. In general the weather was mild with the snowfall 
only slightly less than normal. No water was carried over from the 
nrevious year and the reservoir did not receive so much water from 
Salmon Creek as was anticipated. The spring months were very 
xold and backward which held back the melting of the snows and 
allowed the water to sink into the groimd. 

Early in the spring another season with a short water supply was 
foreseen. The possioility of securing additional water was con- 
sidered early, and it was decided to pump about 1,000 acre-feet 
from Salmon Lake and to run the Duck Lake and Robinson Flat 
piimping plants to capacitv all the time possible. 

Water was started in the canals on May 7, and continued until 
the 23d. The second irrigation was started on J\me 8 and cut oS 
on the 2l8t. During these two months, practically 0.6 of an acre- 
foot per acre was delivered to all lands. 

At the close of Jime, preparations were being made to start the 
water for the third irrigation. The total precipitation for the year 
ending Jxme 30, 1919, was 13.85 inches, which was more than double 



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834 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

that for the preceding year. All of the small private pumping 
plants used in 1918 by tne farmers were used agam this season to 
supplement then* supply. 

The area irrigated this season was 6,500 acres, the decrease being 
due to the abandonment of sandy lands. 

Historical review^ Okanogan project. 



Item. 



1914 


1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 


10,099 


10,099 


10,009 
7^850 


10,009 


10,009 


7,740 


7,800 


8,000 


6,402 


74 


77 


77 


79 


79 


29,700 


24,040 


26,947 


25,182 


9,770 


20.035 


18.580 
2.38 


19.615 


19.801 


6839 


2.59 


iso 


i.40 


'.99 



1919 



Acreage for which service was prepared 

to supply water , 

Acreage Irrigated 

Miles of canal operated 

Water diverted (acre-feet) 

Water delivered to land (acre-feet) 

Per acre of land irrigated (acre-feet) 



10,090 
6,600 
79 
11,000 
8,2S0 
1.27 



SETTLEMENT. 

There was little movement of land. A few tracts changed hands 
at prices ranging from $650 to $1,000 per acre for bearing orchards. 
Those sales were made to local and outside parties, very good 
prices were received for the crops and a fair crop was produced in 
the majority of instances. The financial condition of the farmers 
is good. 

The land investment report, compiled at the close of the season 
of 1918, shows a total gross land value for the project of $2,377,000, 
or about $370 per acre for the area cleared and leveled. The total 
value of stock and equipment is approximately $254,000, or about 
$40 per acre, based on the area cleared and leveled. The bank 
deposits of the three towns in and adjacent to the project have 
shown no increase. Some development work was done during the 
year, consisting of the building oi packing sheds and the letting of 
contracts for additions to present central packing and assembling 
plants. Many automobiles, trucks, and tractors are being pur- 
chased by the farmers. The towns are making a steady and healthy 
growth. 

SeUUmmt daJta^ Okanogan project. 



Item. 



1915 


1910 


1917 


MO 


560 


560 


900 


1,021 


1,060 


440 


468 


475 


434 


453 


466 


6 


6 


10 


900 


1,021 


1,050 


3 


3 


8 


1,500 


1,600 


1,700 


2,400 
8 


2,621 
8 


..no 

8 


4 


4 


4 


$135,000 


$135,000 


$135,000 


$325,000 


$400,000 


$450,000 


1,660 


1,700 


1,760 



1918 



1919 



I 



Total nmnber of farms on project , 

Population 

Number of irrigated forms 

Operated by owners or managers.. . . 

Operated by tenants 

Population.. 

Number of towns. 

Population 

Total population in towns and on forms. 

Number of public schools 

Number of churches 

Number of banks 

Total capital stock 

Amount of deposits 

Number of depositors 



504 

1,162 

401 

878 

23 

1,162 

3 

2,060 

3,212 

7 

8 

4 

$135,000 

$600,000 

1,800 



504 

1,200 

400 

375 

25 

1,160 

8 

2,200 

8,860 

7 

8 

4 

$135,000 

$600,000 

1,800 



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WASHINQTOlSr, OKANOGAN PBOJEOT. 



335 



PBINOIPAIi CROPS. 

The area cropped during the year was 5,287 acres. The total 
value of the crops produced was $749,982.05 or $141.85 per acre 
cropped. The decrease in cropped area was due principally to the 
abandonment of sandy lands embraced in the second unit of the 
project. Although the acreage cropped shows a decrease of 16 per 
cent, the value of crops produced increased approximately 22 per 
cent. This increase was aue mainly to the increase in the price of 
apples and alfalfa over the previous year, the average price ot alfalfa 
bemg $25 per ton and of apples 4 J cents per poimd. Of the 6,400 
acres irrigated, 4,840 are planted to bearing and nonbearing orchards. 
The apple returns average $1.80 per box for a total of 360,000 boxes 
or 475 carloads. 



Crop report, Okanogan project, Washington, year of 1918. 



Crop. 



Area 
(aon»). 



Unit of 
yield. 



Yields. 



TotaL 



Average 
per acre. 



Values. 



Pertmit 
of yield. 



TotaL 



Per acre. 



Apples 

Apricots 

Beans. 

Beets 

Carrots 

Com 

Comlbdder 

SmaU fruit 

Garden 

Hay 

Onions. 

Pasture 

Peaches 

Pears 

Prunes 

Potatoes 

Wheat 

MisceUaneoos 

Less duplicated areas. 



3,846 
14 
36 



1 

68 

63 

3 

98 

148 

1 

142 

39 

27 

6 

44 

96 

27 

864 



Total cropped acneage. 



Irrigated, no crop: 

NonbeariuK cfcbaid. . . . 

Younf aUaUls 

Miscellaneous 

Lest duplicated areas 

Total irrigated acreage 



5,287 



MS 

38 

162 

3 

6,402 



Tons 

Pounds. . . 

...do 

Bushels... 

Tons 

...do 

Bushels... 

Tans 

Pounds... 



3,228 

14,382,060 

51,626 

116 

.2 

3 

1,760 

81 

9,200 



1.6 
3,740 
8,687 

6 



126.00 



&60 



3 
26 
1.6 
3,066 



40.00 
L60 

laoo 

.066 



Tons 

Pounds.. 



200 
3,700 



1.4 

3,700 



36.00 
.04 



Pounds.. 

...do 

...do 

Bushels.. 

..do 

Pounds*. 



124,000 
161,720 
81,000 
3,896 
268 
44,000 



4,290 
6,990 
10,200 
88 
2.7 
1,668 



.026 

.03 
L26 
1.93 

.07 



166,700 

647,194 

1,446 

769 

2 

120 

2,640 

810 

607 

13,806 

6,000 

148 

2,620 

3,190 

6,060 

2,430 

4,870 

499 

•3,063 



186.79 
168.00 
103.26 
30.36 



120.00 
38.80 
16.30 

202.40 

14a 90 
33.80 

148.00 
18.46 

iiaoo 

187.40 
486.00 
lia70 
6.20 
114.18 



Totaland aversge. . 



740,983 



141.85 



Areas. 



IiTlgable area fums reported 

Irrl^ted area farms reported 

Under water right applications. 

Vested water rights. 

Cn^ped area Itons reported 



Acres. 



7,644 
0,402 
6,021 
1,881 

6,287 



Farms. 



401 

401 

361 

40 

401 



Percent 

of 
project. 



74.7 
6314 
49.7 
18.6 

61.8 



PTJBUO NOTICES AND OBDEBS. 
FUBLIO NOTICE, AUGUST 29, 1918. 

1. Supplemental constmctioA agreemeAts. — Under the provisions of 
the reclamation act of June 17, 1902 (32 Stat., 388). and acts amenda- 
tory thereof or supplementary thereto, particularly section 4 of 
the reclamation extension act of August 13, 1914 (38 Stat., 686), a 
majority of the water-right applicants and owners of the lands 
included in district No. 1 of the Okanogan project, Washington, have 



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336 EIGHTEENTH AKNTJAL BEPOBT OF SBCLAICATION SEBYIOB. 

made agreements providing for an increase in the cost of construction 
in the sum of $12.50 per irrigable acre, and an additional annual 
charge covering the cost of operation and maintenance. This 
increased construction charge and additional operation and main- 
tenance charge is for the purchase, installation, and operation and 
maintenance of necessary power and pumping machinery for pumping 
water to lands within the aforesaid mstrict, said water to be pumped 
from Duck Lake during the time of water shortage in Conconully 
Reservoir. 

2. Eatiflcation. — The said agreements are hereby ratified and con- 
firmed and the said increase in the construction charge of $12.50 per 
irrigable acre, and an additional annual charge for operation and 
mamtenance, are hereby made effective in accordance with the con- 
ditions of the said agreements and as herein specified. 

3. Lands affected. — The lands in the district, all of which are sub- 
ject to said increased cost of construction and additional yearly 
operation and maintenance chaise, are described as follows: T. 34 N., 
K 26 E., W. M.— Sec. 1, SE. i NE. i, E. i SE. i; sec. 12, E. i NE. J 
and SE. \ and S. i SW. i; sec. 13, NW. i NE. i, SE. i, SE. i, and 
20 acres m NE. i SE. i T. 34 N., R. 27 E., W. M.— Sec. 6, lots 
2, 3, 4, 6, and 7; sec. 7, lots 2, 3, 5, and 6; sec. 18, lot 4. 

4. Payment of increased constmction charge. — Such increased 
charge of $12.50 per irrigable acre shall be added to the construction, 
charge against the land in question and be paid in additional annual 
inst^ments after the last of the installments of the present construc- 
tion charge, being two annual installments* of $6.25 per irrigable 
acre each. 

5. Advance payment of increased constrnction charge permissible.— 
Any water-right applicant in question may, at his option, pay in 
advance the whole or any part of the increased construction charge 
owing by him within any shorter period than that prescribed by this 
notice. 

6. Payment of additional operation and maintenance charge. — ^The 
additional annual operation and maintenance cost on account of the 
power and pumping machinery herein provided for, beginning with 
the irrigation season of 1918, shall be added when ascertained, to the 
regular annual operation and maintenance charge and shall be payable 
at the same times and under the same terms and conditions. 

E. C. Bradley, 
Assistant to the Secretary of the Interior. 

PUBLIC NOnOE, SEPTEMBER 10, 1918. 

1. Amendment to public notice of April 18, 1917. — Section 6 of the 
public notice issued for the Okanogan project. Washington, dated 
April 18, 1917, is hereby amended to reaa as follows: 

6. General constmction charge. — The construction charge shall be 
$95 per irrigable acre (less any amount heretofore paid per irrigable 
acre, upon any construction charge against the land m questioUi 
under any pubUc notice heretofore issued for the project). For 
lands that were on or before August 13, 1914, subjected by contract 
or otherwise to the provisions of the reclamation law, said charge 
shall be payable in 10 equal annual installments, the first of which 
for lands of the first and second units shall become due and payable 



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WASHINGTON, OKANOGAN PROJECT. 337 

on December 1, 1917, and for lands of the third unit on December 
following the date of water-right application, and subsequent in- 
stallments in each case on December 1 of each year thereafter: 
Provided y however, That if water-right appUcation subject to the 
proviBions of the reclamation extension act, or an acceptance of the 
provisions of said act, be filed within six months from the date of this 
notice, said construction charge shall be payable in 20 annual install- 
ments commencing as aforesaid, the first four of which shall each be 
2 per cent, the next 2 installments shall be each 4 per cent, and the 
next 14 each 6 per cent thereof. The aforesaid construction charge 
shall be decreased to the extent of any payments heretofore made 
thereon as above stated, and increased by any unpaid water rental 
or operation and maintenance charge heretofore authorized for the 
calendar year 1914, when such increase is requested by the water- 
right applicant. 

E. C. Beadlet, 
Assistant to Uie Secretary of the Interior. 

PUBLIC NOnOE, APRIL 26, 1919. 

1. Annual operation and maintenance charges. — In pursuance of 
section 4 of the reclamation act of June 17, 1902 (32 Stat., 388), and 
acts amendatory thereof or supplementary thereto, particularly the 
reclamation extension act of August 13, 1914 (38 otat., 686), an- 
nouncement is hereby made that the annual operation and main- 
tenance charge for the irrigation season of 1919 and thereafter until 
further notice, against all lands of the Okanogan project, WashingtoUi 
under public notice, shall be a minimum chai]ge oi $4 per irrigable 
acre, whether water is used thereon or not, which charge will permit 
the delivery of not to exceed 1 acre-foot of water per irrigable acre* 
for the first acre-foot per irrigable acre additional, the charge shall 
be SI. 50 per acre-foot; and for further quantities the charge shall be 
$3 per acre-foot. The above charges are subject to the conditions 
that during the flood period of each year, or such time as water is 
wasting into the Okanogan River as determined by the project 
manager, each water user shall be charged with only two-thirds of the 
water delivered. All operation and maintenance charges will be due 
and payable each year, one-half thereof on January 16 and one-half 
thereof on July 1, following the irrigation season. 

John W. Hallowell, 
Assistant to the Secretary of (he Interior. 

188554—19 22 



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838 EIGHTEEKTH AKNUAL BEPORT OF BEOLAMATIOH SEBYIOB. 
FINANOIAL STATEXENT. 



ConderiBed balance sheet, Okanogan project, June SO, 1919. 

Cash 

fiiventory of materials and supplies on hand 

Accounts receivable: 

Current accounts receivable 120,830.52 

Coostruotlon water right charges unaoorued 777,883.96 

Undelivered orders 

Gross construction cost. 947,028.73 

Less construction revenue earnings..., 54,183.37 

Net oomstmction cost 

Gross operation and maintenance cost 157,333.25 

Less operation and maintenance revenue eamingB 57,582.40 

Accounts payable 

Contingent obligatioos 

CdleotloaR and contracts of speciflo amounts for repayments to reclamation fund 

Miscellaneous accruals 

Capital investment: 

Disbursement, transfer and Joint construction vouchers received 1, 128, 884. 53 

Collection, transfer, reftmd and Joint coostruction vouchers issued 209,960.55 



Net Investment 

FeaSiUTe cost ofOhoenogan project to June SO, 1919, 



8468.69 
24,178.48 



807,714.48 
18,187.01 



892,845.86 



99,750.79 

21,500.74 

18,655.63 

883,521.55 

952.84 



918,423.98 



Principal feature. 



Fiscal year 
1919. 



Total toJnne 
30, 1919. 



Original construction: 

Examinations and surveys. . 



Storage works~ 

Salmon Lake Beservolr— 

Inlot canal 

Outlet works 

Salmon Lake Dam.... 



ConoonuHy Reservoir— 

Beal estate 

ClearlBg reservoir site . 

CoBconully Dam 

Spillway 

Outlet works 



Fumptng fbrirrlgatlOD— 
TantlJoTl.... 



Power plant! 
Power plant No. 2. 
Pumping plant. 



Lateral qrstem— 

Diversian weir in Salmon Creek 

Main canal, main laterab and sublaterals.. 



Power system, transmission line. 
Farm units 



Permanent improvements- 
Roads 

Buildings 



Telephone system 

Operation and maintenance during construction (water-rental basis) . 



Total, original construction... 



'Decrease. 



116.00 
U0.00 



116.00 



58.06 

127.00 

1727.00 

1124.40 

175.00 



1801.35 



1907.35 



113.00 
1712.07 



1725.07 



125.00 



125.00 



119.00 



11,676.42 



$4,608.97 



1,993.00 
6,568.63 
2,486.01 



11,047.58 



45,435.68 

8,886.06 

321,108.99 

37,646.80 

34,434.19 



337,486.25 



348,633.78 



11,923.44 
13,031.43 
30, on. 24 



55,983.10 



4,199.89 
403,952.44 



407,092.38 



5,445.83 
1,889.93 



1,106.98 
8,355.78 



9,461.71 



6,679.10 
4,786.86 



844,874.40 



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WASHINGTON, OKANOGAN FBOJBCT. 339 

Feature eoei of Okanogan project to June 30, 19id— Continued. 





Fiscal vear 
1919. 


Total to June 
ao, 1919. 


Supplemental oanstruction: 
Storage worksr- 

Salmon Lake Reservoir— 

Ralmon T^-ake Pam ...................t.... 


132,650.01 

6 903.68 

46.59 

8,200.00 


$32,650.01 


O ut let works and Spillway 


6.903.58 


OiitlAt ohannAl , 


46.59 


T/and purchases t . . . . 


8,200.00 






ConcoTMiTIv Reservoir— Cooconullv TJom enlamment 


47,800.18 
8,462.57 


47,800.18 
8,462.67 








66,282.75 
10,092.72 


66,262.75 
10,092.72 






Total, supplemental construction ^^ ..,.. 


66,355.47 


66,356.47 






Total cost of oonstroction featm^ 


64,679.05 


910,729.87 


"TT'^adJusted cleaHTig acco^mts r x ^ , - 


346.38 


Baiimoe In plant aftpounts r .....-- - . x - 




35,962.48 








Gross CQQstructioin oost to June 30, 1919 


64,679.06 


947,028.73 






Less revenues earned during construction period- 
Rentals of bul]din£S. . -.-t ^t — 




224.00 


R^mtais o' grR«iTip and ♦"arming land ^ ,-.-,-. . 


15.50 

151,672.68 

260.71 

S333.22 


556.60 


Rentals of irrication water 


53,343.08 


Profit on lioq>ltaI operations 


54L94 


T'OSses on operationSj unclassified r - 


1 481. 15 








61,615.67 


64,183.37 


Net construction cost to June 30, loio ,.^,^^^. 


13,063.48 


892,846.36 







> Adjustment of water rentals, 1912-1916, between "rentals of irrigation water— constructian" and 
"rentals of irrigation water— operation and maintenance." 
. tDeduct. 

Statement of costs by calendar years, Okanogan project. 





Construo- 
Uon. 


Operation and maintenance. 






During con- 
struction. 


Under pub- 
lic nodce. 


Total. 


Total cost. 


Year ending Dec. 31— 

1903 : 


•1 

6 

23 
10 








$12,854.78 


1904 








6,037.06 


1905 . . ..». 








8,353.56 


1906 








64,176.40 


1907 








233,066.03 


1908 


$4,138.88 
697.48 


$6,985.35 
10,236.20 
17^605.94 
13,385.93 
9,640.11 
9,780.32 
11,910.35 
13,584.69 
17,547.45 
32,297.72 
13,462.79 


$4,138.88 
7,582.83 
10,236.20 
17,605.94 
13,385.93 
9,640.11 
9,780.32 
11 910.35 
13,584.69 
17 547.46 
32,297.72 
13,462.79 


110,996.43 


1909 


92.040.41 


1910 


61 660.59 


1911 




25,918.34 


1912 




62,242.98 


1913 




66,460.31 


1914 




96,713.29 


1916 




60,411.96 
37,221.4& 


1916 




1917 




37,131.42 
62,411.92 


1918 




Jan. 1 to June 30, 1919 




60,471.79 






Subtotal 


905,993.51 
35; 952. 48 

346.38 


4,786.86 


166,436.86 


161,173.21 


1,067,166.72 
35,952.48 


Plant accounts, June 30, 1919 


1919 




896.40 


896.40 


1,242.78 






Total 


942,292.37 


4,736.86 


157,333.26 


162,009.61 


1,104,36L98 





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340 EIGHTEENTH AKNTJAIi BEPOBT OF BBCLAMATION SERVICE. 
SUUemerU ofco$t by fiscal pears , Okanogan jprojed. 





Constmo- 
Uon. 


Operation and maintenance. 






During 
construc- 
tion. 


Under 
public 
notice. 


Total. 


Total cost. 


Year ending June 30: 

1903 


9991.31 
14,549.91 
4,550.62 
13,739.41 
148,141.69 
196,503.16 
97,948,99 
80,212.40 
5,513.24 
28,937.77 
41,506.18 








1991.31 


1904 








14,549.91 


1905 








4, 66a 62 


1906 








13,739.41 


1907 








148,141.69 


1908 


12,703.12 
2,033.24 




• 12,703.12 
6,104.34 
8,588.62 
14,783.45 
15,168.17 
12.345.65 
8,502.35 
10,313.00 
13,534.42 
13,238.20 
21,143.87 
34,758.02 


198,206.28 


1909 


$4,071.10 
8,588.62 
14,783.46 
15,158.17 
12,345.65 
8,502.35 
10,313.00 
13,534.42 
13,238.20 
21,143.87 
34,758.02 


104,053.33 


1910 


88,801.02 


1911 




20,296.69 


1912 




44,005.94 


1913 




63,831.83 


1914 . 


66,180.31 
95,926.63 
28,775.90 
24,714.54 
4, 122. 50 
64,679.05 




64,682.66 


1915 




106,239.53 


1916 




42,310.22 


1917 ..4 




37,982.74 


1918 




36,266.37 


1919 




99,437.07 








Subtotal 


905,993.61 
36,962.48 

346.38 


4,736.36 


156,436.85 


161,173.21 


1,067,166.72 


Plant accounts on June 30, 1919 


36,952.48 


Undistributed clearing accounts June 80, 
1919 




896.40 


896.40 


1,242.78 








Total 


942,292.37 


4,736.36 


167,333.25 


162,069.61 


1,104,361.« 





Estimated cost of oontemplaied work, Okanogan project, during fiscal year 1920, 



Features. 



Subfeature. 



Principal 
feature. 



Stora^ svstem: 

Salmon Lake Reservoir 

Conoonully Dam enlargement 

Pumping system: Duck Lake plant 

Operation and maintenance under public notice.. 
Reimbursable accounts 



$254,000 
20,000 



$274,000 

9,000 

32,000 

6,000 



Total. 



320,000 



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WASHINGTON, OKANOGAK PBOJECT. 341 

Comparison of operating costs and revenues for the calendar year 1918 and to Dec, SI, 1918. 





Calendar year 1918. 


To Dec. 81, 1918. 


Feature. 


Opera- 
tion. 


Mainte- 


TotaL 


Opera- 
lion. 


Mainte- 
nance. 


TotaL 


COST. 

Storage works:* 

S^mon Lake Reservoir 


$553.64 
1,459.01 


$12a03 
1,902.29 


$673.67 
3,861.30 


$2,163.73 
13,691.59 


$499.45 
2,838.41 


$2,663.18 
16,530.00 


Conconully Reservoir 






2,012.65 


2,022.32 


4,034.97 


15,855.32 


3,837.86 


19,193.18 


PompiDg tor irrigation 


11,449.01 


6,462.68 


17,911.69 


12.661.64 


7,016.14 


19,677.63 




I«ateral system: 

Diversion Dam 




163.77 
1,768.18 

170.69 
2,178.81 
1,920.38 

175.28 


163.77 
8,085.15 

84L21 
3,433.34 
2,683.65 

175.28 


*7,*i3i'94' 
1,487.12 
17,412.22 
11,279.47 


248.33 
10,514.55 

306.00 

30,-929.05 

20,782.41 

1,256.82 


248.33 


Miif n (>nftl 


i, 282. 02 
670.62 

1,254.53 
763.27 


17,647.49 

1,792.12 

48,34L27 

32,n6L88 

1,256.82 


South Side CanaL 


Upper main lateral 


Tvower main lateral 

Diversion of private ditcties 










3,070.44 


6,361.96 


10,322.40 


37,3n.75 


64,036.16 


101,347.91 


Uaintenance of permanentimprove- 
ments 




2&76 


28.76 




2,765.29 


2,766.29 









Total 


17,432.10 


14,865.62 


32,297.72 


65,828.61 


77,145.45 


142,974.06 




BBVBNUES. 

Operation and maintenance charges 
accrued on contracts with water- 
right Applicants 


. 




16,526.04 

87.98 
415.80 






$71,842.26 
41.34 


Penalties on operation and mainte- 
with water-ri^t applicants 











ftental of land Sad b^uildtngs dmlng 
operation period 










2,446.47 
65,496.18 

1354.03 


Rental of irrigation water 











Less discount allowed on operation 

on contracts with water-right ap- 
plicants (cont»Ti) 


























Total 






16,079.82 
n5,317.90 






129,47L22 
»13,602.84 


Tr>|fffF?n«p (d«<Mt) 





















> Deduct. 

s Deficit due to water shortage during season of 1918, necessitating installation and operation of pump- 
ing plants. 



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WABHIHOTOH, TAKIIIA PBOJECT. 

B. K. Tiffany, project manager, Yakima, Wash. 
LOCATION. 

Counties: Yakima, Benton, and Kittitas. 

Townships: 8 to 22 N., Rb. 11 to 27 E., Willamette meridian. 

Railroads: Northern Pacific; (^cago, Milwaukee & St. Paul; Union Pacific Sys- 
tem; Yakima Valley Transportation Go. 

Railroad stations and estuiated population June 30, 1919: Grandview, 800; Sunny- 
side, 1,600; Outlook, 200; Granger, 500; Zillah, 600; Mabton, 600; Donald. 100; Ben- 
ton City, 100; Prosser, 1.500; Eflensburg, 5,000; Thorp, 300; Union Gap, 200; Yakima, 
22,000; Naches, 600; Wapato, 500; Toppemsh, 1,700; Parker, 50; and Biwaia, 200. 

WATE& STTPPLY. 

8UNNT8IDB UMTT. 

Source of water 8up|)ly: Yakima River and tributaries. 
Area of drainage basin: 3,550 sqmare miles. 

Annual run-oK in acre-feet of Yakima River at Union Gap: 3,550 square miles, 
1897 to 1918, maximum, 4,680,000; minimum, 1,570,000; mean, 3,290,000. 

TIBTON UNIT. 

Somrce of water supi>ly: Tieton River and its tributaries. 
Area of drainac;e basin: 247 sauare miles. 

Annual run-off in acre-feet of Tieton River at canal headworks, 1908-1918, maxi- 
mum, 484,000; minimum, 252,000; mean, 300,000. 

AGBICXTIiTaBAL AND CLIMATIC CONDITIONS. 

Area for which service is prepared to supply water, season of 1919: Sunnyside unit, 
100,130 acres; Tieton unit, 32.000 acres. 

Area under water-right applications and rental contracts, season of 1919: Sunnyside 
unit, 96»867 acres; Tieton unit, 30,880 acres. 

Length of irrigating season: Sunnyside unit, April 1 to October 31, 214 days; Tieton 
unit, May 1 to October 1, 153 days. 

Average elevation of iirigable area: 1,000 feet above sea level. , 

Rainfall on irrigable area: At Sunnyside, 1895 to 1918, average, 6.6 inches; 1918, 
5.45 inchea; at Tieton, 1911 to 1918, average, 8.50 inches* 1918, 5.40 inches. 

Rant^e of temperature on irrigable area: — ^21^ to 110^ F. 

Character of soil of irrigable area: Sunnyside unit— on about three-fourths of the 
unit the soil is sandy loam or volcanic ash from 10 to 60 feet deep. The remainder 
is decomposed basalt, underlain by gravel or a combination of this with the above-- 
named soib. Tieton .imit — ^volcanic ash and decomposed baealt, underlain with 
gravel. 

Principal products: Forage, hops, vegetables, and fruit; stock and dairv products. 

Principal markets: Cities of the Northwest, British Columbia, and Alaska; fruit 
markets, the entire United States. 

LANDS OPENED FOB ntBIGATION. 

BUNNYSIDB UNIT. 

Dates of public notices: November 18, 1908; March 2, 1909; April 18, April 19, 
May 2, 1910; March 15, 1911; February 29, May 31, 1912; June 16, June 23, October 
2, 1913; March 10, April 11, and September 24, 1914; March 31, July 27, 1915; April 
6, May 31, 1916; Mayl6, 1917; April 4, May 6, 1918; March 11, 1919. 

Location of lands opened: Tps. 8 to 12 N., Rs. 19 to 27 E., Willamette meridian. 

342 



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WASHmcnoH, yaktma pbojeot. 843 

Duty of water: 3 acre-feet per acre per ammm at the farm. 

limit of area of farm units: Public, 80 acres; private, 160 acres. 

Bmlding charge per acre of irrigable land: 152 to $64. 

Anixual operauon and maintenance charee: II per acre vested water rights; for 
public Bodce lands a minimum of |2, whicn will permit delivery of not more than 
the following amounta x>er irrigable acre: To lands of class A, 2 acre-feet; to lands of 
dass B, 2} acre-feet; to lands of class 0, 3 acre-feet. For additional water above the 
foregoing amounts, the rate shall be 60 cents per acre-foot. Provided, that for newly 
reclaim^ lands no charge will be made for water actually needed in excess of the 
amount covered by a chtt^ of ^ per irrigable acre at the said rates. 

nSTON TJNIT. 

Dates of public notices and orders: November 7, 1910; March 8, April 14, 1911; 
January 24, February 21, April 18, May 10, W12; March 21, April 25, June 16, 1913; 
March 4, September 24, 1914; March «, Mardi 20, October 30, 1915; March 16, AprU 3, 
1916; March 17, 1917; April 12, November 15, 1918; March 11, 1919. 

Location of lands opened: Tps. 12 to 15 N., Rs. 16 to 18 E., Willamette meridian. 

Dutv of water: That quantity of water which shall be beneficially used for the 
irrigation of the lands and in no case exceed the riiare proportionate to irrigable acre- 
age of water supply actually avaUable. The average use is about 2.25 acre-feet per aci« 
delivered at the farm. 

Limit of area of farm units: Public, 40 acres; private, 1^ acres. 

Building chaige per acre of irrigable land: 193 plus $11.63 supplemental 
construction. 

Annual operation and maintenance chaige: For all water d^ivered between June 1 
and August 31, inclusive, |1 per acre-foot; for all water delivered at other times 
durii^ uie Irrigation season, 60 cents pre acr^foot; with a minimum of $1.25 per 
irricable acre whether water is used or not, which mimmum amount when paid is 
credited up<m the account for water d^vered at Ito above acre-foot rates. 

CHBONOLOGICAL SXJHHABY. 

Reconnoissance and pr^iminary surveys in 1903. 

Report of Board of Engineers recommending construction October 16, 1905. 

Construction of Sunn^^e and Tieton units authorized by Secretary December 12, 
1905; Wapato unit, June 16, 1906. 

Sunnyside Canal purchased June 23, 1906. 

First irri|;ation by Reclamation Service, Sunnyside unit, season of 1907. 

TietoQ diversioa dam completed December, 1908. 

Tieton Main Canal completed in 1909. 

Bumping Lake Dam completed in 1910. 

First irrigation by Reclamation Service, Tieton unit, season of 1911. 

Tieton unit completed winter of 1911-12. 

Kachess Dam completed fall of 1912. 

Warren Act contract with Kittitas reclamation district executed by Secretary of 
Interior January 18,1913. 

Contract with Sunnyside irrifjation district signed October 6, 1914. 

Contract with Snipes Mo^mtain irrigation district signed November 16, 1914. 

Contract with Outlook irrigation district sipied Novwmber 23j 1914. 

Construction for Sunnyside irrigation district (Benton extension) completed April, 
1916. 

Construction for Outlook irrigation district completed June 1, 1916. 

Construction for Snipes Mountain irriRation district complied June 30, 1916. 

Contract with Grandview irrigation district signed August 4, 1916. Construction 
completed July 31, 1917. Construction, gravity system, completed June 30, 1917. 

Contract with Prosser irrigation dis^ct signed December 1, 1917; construction 
completed June 30, 1919. 

Contract with Yakima-Tieton irrigation district authorizing expenditures under 
supplemental construction ai|;ned August 7, 1918. 

Enlaigement of Tieton Main Canal completed December, 1918. 

Per cent completed June 30, 1919: Storage unit, 42 per cent; Sunnyside unit, 
95 per cent; Tieton unit, 99 per cent. 



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844 EIGHTEENTH AKNUAL BEPOBT OF BEOLAIfi^ON SEBYIOE. 

IBBIGATION PLAN. 

The irrigation plan of the Yakima project provides for the storage of flood waters 
of the Yakima River and its tributaries in Ea!chess, Eeechelus, Clealum, and Bump- 
ing Lakes, and in a reservoir at McAlister Meadows; the diversion of water ^m the 
Yakima River for the irrigation of 62,000 acres of land on both sides o| the river in the 
vicinity of EUensburg, comprising the Kittitas unitj the diversion of water from the 
east bank of the Yakinia River near Parker for the irrigation of 110,828 acres of land by 
means of the old Sunnyside Canal, as improved and extended by the Reclamation 
Service, comprising the Sunnyside unit; tne diversion of water from the Tieton River 
below McAlister Meadows (a reservoir being provided on the headwaters of this stream 
to regulate diurnal flow) for the irrigation of 32,000 acres of land lying between the 
Naches River and Ahtanum Creek, in the vicinity of Yakima, comprising the 
Tieton unit; and the diversion of water from the west bank oi the Yakima Riv^ near 
Parker for the irrigation by means of the canal system of the Yakima Indian Reser- 
vation, improved and extended, of 106,000 acres of land by gravity, and 14,000 acres 
of land by pumping with power developed at drops in the canals, comprising the 
Wapato unit. The plan also provides for the development of power from drops in 
the main canals and laterals of the Sunnyside and Tieton units tooe used for pumping 
irri|:ation water and for other purposes. The United States claims all waste, seepage, 
spring, and percolating water arising within the project and proposes to use such water 
in connection therewith. 

The following features of the above plan have been completed: Sunnyside unit: 
Diversion dam, enlaigement of main canal. Sulphur Credk wasteway, and the dis- 
tribution svstem, Benton extension (Sunn^rside motion district). Snipes Mountain 
iirigation distnct (pumping unit). Outlook irrigation district, (pumping unit), Grand- 
view irrigation district (pumping unit), Prosser irrigation district (pumping unit); 
Tieton unit: Bumping Lake storage dam. Clear Creek Dam, Tieton tUver diversion 
dam, main canal, and distribution system. 

Minor construction work on Kachess dam and clearing of the reservoir area at 
Lake Keechelus have been in progress. The outlet tunnel at Tieton Reservoir has 
been completed. 

Features for future construction are the Granger siphon, Mabton pumping plant, 
Gealum and Tieton Reservoirs. Surveys for new canal systems to serve from 150,000 
to 200,000 acres of flrst-class land are under way. The lands to be irrigated lie above 
existing canals in the Naches, Selah, Moxee, Sunnyside, and Cold Creek Valleys 
north ol the Yakima River, and a body of land between Kiona and Kennewick south 
of the Yakima River. 



SX7HMABY OF GENERAL DATA FOB YAKIMA PBOJEOT TO END 
OF FISCAL YEAB 1919. 



Suzmyside 
oiiU. 



Tieton unit. 



Storage unit. 



Total. 



Areas: 

Irrigable a^eage vhen oomplete 

Public land entered to June 80, 1919 

State liUid June 80, 1919 

Railroad land June 80, 1919 

Private laud June 30. 1919 

Acieaffe service could have supplied in sea- 
son 1918 

Estimated acreage service can supply 
season 1919 

Estimated acreage service can supply 
season 1920 

Acreage irrigated season 1918 

Acreage cropped under irrigation season 
1918 



U0,828 
2,827 
1^158 



107,043 

98,587 

100,130 

106,000 
84,660 

70,465 



32,000 

2,052 

2)016 

280 

27,702 

81,000 

82,000 

32,000 
26,400 

25.845 



142,828 

4,679 

8,174 

280 

184,746 

129,687 

182,180 

187,000 
m,Q90 

96,810 



Ctooa: 

value of irrigated crops, season 1918 

Value of irrigated crops per acre cropped. . , 
Finances: 

Net construction cost to June 30, 1919 

Per cent completed on June 30. 1919 

Appropriated for fiscal yearl920 

Estimated per cent complete by June 30, 
1920 



17,213,392.00 
$102.36 

13,339,421.44 
95 



82,516,251.00 
897.36 

13,362,369.23 
99 



13,506,683.96 
42 



89,729.643.00 
I10LQ3 

$10^300,424.68 

"$353,'d6o.'66 



05 



99 



42 



1 Net construction costs above, $10,300,424.63; add net construction cost high-line investigations, $114. 
700.57; total net construction cost, YaUma project, June 30, 1919, $10,415,215^17. 



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WASHINGTON^ YAKTMA PBOJEOT. 845 

Summary of general data for Yatima project to end of fiscal year i9i9— Continued. 





Sunnyside 
unjft. 


Tietonunlt. 


Storage unit. 


Total. 


Proposed appropriatian for flaoal year 1921.. 








8851,000 


Estfcaated per cent oomplete by Jane 80, 
1921 


95 

162 to 164 


90 

103.00 
811.63 


48 


Annonnoed oonstruction obarges per acre— 
<^»1gina1 o^nsttictioii 




SnDDlemental 














Appropriation fiscal year 1919 








1645,000.00 











25,066.94 


Collections and transfers 








120,408.80 


Increased compensation ... 








32,414.87 


* ******** 










' — - 








828, 89a 61 












Bnenditares chargeable to 1919 appropria- 
Disbursements 








652,855.62 
51,769.84 


Transfers 








Current liabilities 








101,789.18 


Contingent UablUties 








5,637.25 












Total* 








711 551.89 












TTnenonmbered balance on July 1, 1919. 




- 




117,339.22 


Repayments: 

Value of oonstruction water-ri^t oantcaots. 


88,481,891.98 


82,017,495.83 


8668,202.00 


7,067,589.31 


Construction charges— 

Aoorued to June 80, 1919 


914,807.7« 
898,118.15 


48S,49a81 
461,074.72 


515,504.40 
514,804.40 


1,918,302.47 
1,868,907.27 


Collected to June 86, 1919 






21,189.61 


22,415.59 


700.00 


44,306.20 






Operation and maintenance charges- 
Accrued to June 30, 1919 


855,833,34 
884,489.43 


310,229.41 
290,206.49 


31,930.13 
31,904.08 


1.198.092.88 


Collected to June 80, 1919 


1,166,660.00 






Uncollected on June 80, 1919 


21,443.91 


19,962.92 


26.06 


41,482.88 






Water rental charges— 

Acomed to June 80, 1919 


46,441.05 
46,279.73 


6,216.50 
6,216.50 


21,702.50 
21,194.50 


74, 46a 05 


Collected to June 36, 1919 


73, 09a 78 






Unoolleeted on June 80, 1919 


161.82 




598.00 


750.82 








Power charges— 

Accrued to June 30, 1919 


1,860.20 
1,860.20 




1,766.13 
1,766.13 


8,685.83 


CoUeoted to June 86, 1W9 




8,685.88 








Drainage: 

EsSmated aereage damaged by seepage to 
Jnn^30,i9»9 ... » 


10,000 

70 

50 

42,000 

8028,248.00 

811,418.80 


100 

8 

1 

1,350 




10,100 
78 


HUes of drain bum to June 80, 191»- 

Open 




cfcsed.::::::::::::;::::::;:::::::::;::; 




51 


June 80, 1919 




48,850 


Cost of draiuige works to June 80, 1919- 




Oovemment invesUgations 






8934,661.80 









STOBAOE TJmT. 
OONSTBXJCnON DXTKINa FISCAL YBAB. 

Kachess Dam.— No construction was done at the dam site, but 
operation and maintenance of the structures were continued through- 
out the year. 

Clealum Crib Dam. — ^No construction was done during the vear, 
but operation and maintenance of the structure were continued. 

Keechdus Dam. — Some work was done cleaning out the spillway 
channel, excavating the spillway approach channel, and trimming 



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346 EIGHTEENTH AKNTTAL BIQPOBT OF EEOLAMATION SEBYIOE. 

the top of the dam. The cofferdam was removed from the intake 
chamiel to the 'outlet ^orlira: and a large p<»tion of the channel was 
excavated to final ^ade. Tne gate-tower sump was pumped out and 
the outlet works inspected. Clearing of the reservoir area was 
continued. Approximately 200 acres were cleared during the year. 

Tieton Dam. — ^No work was done at this dam oUier th£a the care 
of the equipment and camp and the decking of some logs in the 
reservoir area. 

Olear Creek Dam. — ^This dam was raised 21 feet to its final height; 
and the spillway completed. 

BOABD KESTmaS. 



Date. 


Topic. 


Personnel. 


July iWO, 1918 


Location and type of Tieton Dam. 


A. P. Davis, W. L. Marshall, D. C. Henny. 
P. E. Weymouth, Ohas. H. Swigart, and 
C. E. Crownover. 



stmrsiDB mriT. 

OONSTBTTOTBOK JfnjSQ WIMOAL TBAB. 

The construction woric consisted of the completion of the pumping 
and power plants tor the Snipes Mountain, Outlook, and Grandview 
irrigation districts, and the continuation of work on the pumping 
plants and distribution system for the ProssOT irrigation district. 

For Snipes Mountain irrigation district redesigned parts were 
installed in the small unit of Uie Snipes plant and this unit as modified 
was tested on March 28, 1919, and found to be satisfactory. 

In the Outlook irrigation district, laterals in the gravity system 
were enlarged and extended in order to provide additional power 
water for the pumping plant. Two hundred and forty-one acres, 
excluded from the mstnct because the owner refused to execute trust 
deeds as required by the department, had changed hands and on 
petition of the new owner were again taken into the district and 
contract with the district revised to include it. The pumping plant 
was originally designed and built to serve this area, the omy new 
work during the year being the installation of necessary deliveries. 

Work for the Grandview irrigation district consisted of installation 
of minor equipment, sudi as settling tanks, etc., in the Rocky Ford 
power plant, and the enlargement and extension of Rocky Ford 
lateral m order to provide additional power water to operate the 
Rocky Ford power plant to capacity. 

Work for the Prosser irrigation district consisted of completion 
of the pumping plants and distribution system, except lining the 
main laterals with concrete. From midsummer, 1918, xmtil the close 
of the construction camp in October, 1918, the work accompUshed 
on the Prosser plants comprised the construction of the two power 
houses and the completion of the penstocks and discharge pipes. 
On the distribution system all excavation was completed ana pipe 
lines installed. After the closing of the camp a small crew continued 
the work of installation of smaU structures throughout the distribiu 
tion system until weather conditions made it necessary to discontinue 
all work. 



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WASHIHGTOISr^ TAKIMA FBOJBCT. 847 

The machinery for the pumping plants was received and installed 
during March and April. On the Spring Creek unit the pipe lines 
and laterals were placed in service for deuvery of water May 1. On 
the Rrosser unit the priming of the pipe lines and laterals was accom- 
plished the fore part of May and tne pumping plant was ready for 
service May 16, although delivery of water was'not started imtil May 
19. Both units were tested ana accepted during May. Coincident 
with the installation of the machinery a small crew was occupied 
with the completion of the. distribution system. AU construction 
work for the district was completed by June 30, except lining the main 
laterals with concrete. 

DRAIKAGB. 

The drainage system on the Sunnyside unit has been constructed 
and is operated and maintained by drainage districts in accordance 
with the State law. Since 1912, 30 drains with a length of 132.6 
miles, have been completed or are under construction. Of the 132.5 
miles of drains, 78.5 are open ditch and 54 miles are covered tile 
drains from 4 to 24 inches in diameter. The total excavation for 
drains built or under construction approximates 1,626,000 cubic 
yards, at a cost of 1923,243, and aflfects 42,295 acres of land. 

Of the 30 drains built, 16, serving 21,875 acres, discharge into Sul- 
phur Creek wasteway, which serves the twofold purpose of a relief 
for the main canal and the main artery of the drainage system for 
the coimtry between Outlook and Grandview. 

OPBBATION AND KAINTBNANCE. 

The operation of the Sunnyside Canal and distribution system 
from July 1, 1918^ to the close of the 1918 irrigation season, October 
31, was wimout mcident other than the usual routine. After the 
heavy demand for water in the early spring, the demand during the 
remainder of the season was steady and continuous. Excess deliv- 
eries were allowed in many cases where soil or crop condition war- 
ranted. The maximum quantity diverted from the Yakima River 
was 1 ,235 second-feet on July; 7. There was no appreciable slackening 
of the demand for water xmtil the latter part of August. After that, 
however, the demand gradually lessened until the close of the 
irrigation season. For the season of 1918 the service was prepared to 
furnish water to 98,537 acres; 93,902 acres were under water-right 
application or contract and delivery of water was made to 84,650 acres. 

The operating season of 1919 opened March 12, when approxi- 
mately 176 second-feet were turnea into the main canal for priming. 
By April 10 diversion from the river had been increased to approxi- 
mateljr 600 second-feet, and water was being delivered to the several 
irrigation districts in accordance with Uie demand. On tJie gravity 
system all demand was being cared for except for lands under laterals 
which were being reconstructed as local improvement districts and 
imder the Rocky Ford and Rvder Canals where, because of enlarge- 
ment of these canals, some delay was had in initiating water service. 
By April 20 full service was furnished under the Rocky Ford and 
Ryder Canals and by May 1 under all laterals where there had been 
delay on accoimt of reconstruction. During April there were several 
breaks and leaks in the branch canals and larger laterals, none of 



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ar48 EIGHTEENTH ANNTTAL BEPOET OP EECLAMATION SEBVIOE. 

which, however, resulted m material damage or.serioxis interruption 
of water service. The demand for water increased rapidly until 
May 1, when the diversion was approximately 1,200 second-feet. 
From that date until June 30 it varied from 1,160 second-feet to a 
maximimi of 1,230 second-feet on June 28. 

The maintenance work, done mostly in the nonirrigation season, 
consisted of the usual work of removal of silt, prevention and cor- 
rection of erosion, repair and replacement of structures, and upkeep 
of telephone system, buildings, and groxmds. In addition, 1,100 
lineal feet of 26-inch diameter wood stave pipe were replaced with 
27-inch diameter vitrified clay pipe; and five wooden flimies of the 
usual box type, on the Mabton Canal, a total length of 744 lineal 
feet, were replaced by an eaual numher of .flumes of the semicircular 
wood-stave type. During tiie year, in addition to the replacement of 
many wood structures in the distribution system, there were con- 
structed 40 new wooden delivery structures, 85 concrete delivery 
structures, and 16 concrete and steel turnouts from main and branch 
canals. 

Historical review, SunnysOe unit, Yakima project. 



Item. 



1915 


1916 


1917 


1918 


81,807 


89,253 


97,176 


1 
98,537 


67,000 


71,400 


78,000 


84,650 


2,450 


2,553 


2,682 


2 740 


626 


'672 


590 


697 


314,068 


» 276, 210 


353,287 


413,829 


203,397 


180,413 


234,662 


287,395 


3.036 


2.527 


3.008 


3.496 



1919 



Acreage for which service was prepared to 

supplv water 

Acreage IrriTated 

Number of farms irrigated 

Miles of canal operated 

Waterdiverted (acre-feet) 

Water diverted to land (acre-feet) . . , 
Per acre of land irrigated <acTO-fcct).. 



100,130 

87,000 

2,800 

605 

417,943 

293,031 

3.368 



1 Shortage in supply of water available in the river, Aug. 8 to Oct 23, 1916. 
SETTUSMBNT AND DEVELOPMENT. 

The good progress made in 1917 continued during the calendar 
year 1918 and the first half of 1919. The high prices received for 
larm products have resulted in a brisk movement of land, both raw 
and improved. One of the most satisfactory results has been the 
decrease in tenant farming and the increase in farms operated by 
owners. From 1915 to 1917 the number of farms operated by own- 
ers, or in a few cases by resident managers, decreased from 1,910 to 
1,744, but since 1917 there has been a steady increase to 1,983. 
The number operated by tenants increased from 540 to 938 in 1917, 
but decreased to 797 in the present year. The ability to secure 
Federal farm loans has made it possime for many t^iants to pur- 
chase farms for themselves, and nonresident owners, many of whom 
have been willing but unable to sell for several years past, are now 
disposing of their property. The tendency toward stock raising and 
general farming continues, and with it the tendency to larger average 
holdings. 

Although there is no increase in the niunber of public schools, 
there have been many additions to the present buildmgs. Business 
men report that business has been better than ever before, with 
more cash purchases and fewer bad debts. The automobile as a 
means of travel is the rule rather than the exception among fanners, 
and considerable numbers of trucks and tractors are in evid^ice. 



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WASHINGTON, YAKIMA PROJECT. 



349 



Work was initiated on a road-building program for good hard- 
surfaced roads on all main highways and principal feeders to ship- 
ping points. There has been a large amount of building in the 
towns, the most noticeable of which is in the warehouse districts. 
This is particularly noticeable in Grandview, Zillah, and Buena. 

Settlement data, SunnyMe umt, Yahima project. 



Items. 



1915 



1916 


1917 


1918 


2,653 


2,682 


2,740 


7,844 


8,000 


8,255 


2,563 


2,682 


2,740 


1,898 


1,744 


1,942 


ft55 


938 


798 


7,844 


8,000 


8,265 


13 


13 


13 


6,268 


6,360 


6,550 


13,112 


.13,350 


13,805 


34 


36 


37 


30 


30 


30 


9 


9 


9 


1309,573 


1245,000 


$277,500 


$1,112,296 


,$1,806,341 


$2,349,702 


5,674 


6,640 


7,376 



1919 



Total iitimb«r Of farms on project 

Population of 

Number of irrigated farms 

Operated by owners or managers. . . 

Operated by tenants 

Population of 

Numbei of towns 

Population of 

Total population of towns and on farms . . . 

Number of public schools 

Number of churches 

Nimiber of banks 

Total caplUl stock 

Total amount of deposits 

Total number of depositors 



2,450 1 
7,270 
2,450 1 
1,910 I 
540 . 
7,270 ' 
13 I 
5,460 
12,730 
34 
30 I 
9 
$255,000 
$1,028,679 I 
5,848 



2,780 

8,744 

2,780 

1,983 

797 

8,744 

13 

5,975 

14,719 

37 

. 30 

10 

$275,000 

$2,642,851 

7,936 



PRINCIPAL CROPS. 

The season of 1918 was generally unfavorable for crops. Although, 
on the whole, the winter of 1917-18 was comparatively mild, killing 
frosts occurred as late as May 8. Because of the late frosts, together 
with frequent winds throughout the spring and entire summer, plant 
growth of aU kinds was retarded and the crop of berries and other 
soft fruits was greatly reduced, as compared with previous years. 
No unusually severe storms occurred during the year and, except 
for an excessive amount of high, and sometimes very warm, winds 
throughout the spring and summer, the weather was about normal. 
Although the maximum temperature of 107° on July 17 was the 
highest experienced in several years, there was not the long period . 
of extreme heat, such as was had in July, 1917. The minimum 
temperature was 8°, which was not so low as usual. The total 
precipitation for the year was 5.45 inches, somewhat below the 
average. 

The mild winter and absence of snow, except for a light fall at 
intervals, permitted the grazing of stock throughout fumost the 
entire winter. The mild weather also permitted the ranchers to ac- 
complish a considerable amount of work during the winter and early 
spring, which helped materially to overcome the general scarcity of 
labor. The fall was also xmusually mild and this condition not only 
permitted a full ripening of all crops, but also prolonged the harvest 
season and in a great measure relieved the labor situation. Because 
of the very favorable weather conditions, maintenance work was also 
carried on to advantage throughout the entire year. 

In the early spring the prospect for a bumper crop was excellent, 
but late frosts, followed by a period of hot days and cold nights 
throughout the latter part of May, destroyed this prospect and re- 
sulted in a diminishea yield of all crops, almost amounting to a 
failure in the case of sugar beets. During this period the thermom- 
eter repeatedly varied 50® or more withm 24 hours and the result 



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860 EIGHTEENTH ANKUAIi REPOET OF BBOLAMATION SERVIOE. 

was partial blight of most root crops and a plague of aphis on alfalfa 
and fruits. Fortunately, the rather low yields were largely counter- 
balanced by unusually good prices when the crops were harvested 
and the net result was in general a very prosperous year for tiie 
farmer. 

Alfalfa continues to be the largest crop in acreage grown. The 
average yield of 4.3 tons per acre was the lowest for several years, 
but the averse price of $22 a ton, giving a return of $94.60 per 
acre, is the highest of record and by reason of this return alfalfa 
continues the staple crop for the average farmer. The total increase 
of area in alfalfa was 5,341 acres, or 17 per cent as compared with 
1917. The area planted to hay other than alfalfa shows an increase 
of 11 per cent, wnile the area m pasture remains approximately the 
same. The area planted to potatoes shows a marked decrease as 
compared with the preceding year, this decrease amounti^ to 1,863 
acres, or approximately 35 per cent of the 1917 area. Tke reason 
for this was the comparatively low prices received for the 1917 crop, 
particularly for that portion which was sold in the spring of 1918. 
Com shows approximately a 10 per cent increase in area planted, 
although not quite so much of it went into the sUo, while the average 
return of $70 per acre was somewhat above normal. On the greater 
portion of the project there were no soft fruits other than pears, 
which proved not only an exception as to producing generally 
throughout the project, but in contrast to all otner fruit produced a 
somewhat better than normal yield. The yield of apples was spotted 
and in many places where there was a fair crop a large share of tiie 
fruit was culled at harvest time because of pests. 

In 1918 a laige acreage of sugar beets was {>lanted on the Sunny- 
side unit, but a severe attack of blight entirely destroyed many 
fields and reduced the average yield on the 4,074 acres actually 
harvested to 5 tons per acre as compared with the average for 1917 of 
10 tons. Tiie planting of beets in 1919 is about 2,700 acres and tiieir 
condition on June 30 was good. Work on the Simnyside and Top- 
nenish factories, which was stopped in the simmier of 1918 due to 
b%ht and the war demand for labor, has been resumed and both 
wiD be completed within the present year. 

The total crop return of $7,213,392 is $792,841 less than the total 
return for 1917. The decrease is more than accounted for in tiie 
decreased return from potatoes and apples, which, tc^etiier, show 
an approximate decreased return oi $1,250,000. The average 
return per acre cropped for 1918 is $102.36 as compared with $121.67 
for 1917. The stocic census for 1918 shows that the tendency to 
reduce the number of live stock on the project, so strongly prevalent 
in 1917, has been arrested except for cattle. Horses, ho^, and 
sheep show an increase both in number and value, while catue show 
a decreased number accompanied by an increased value. The 
retiu-ns as to silos indicate too that the dairy industry for the present 
is not expanding, while the increase in the number of automobiles 
continues to show the prosperity of the average farmer. 



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WASHINGTON; YAKIHA PBOJBCT. 
Crop report Yakima project, Sunnyside unit, 1918. 



861 



Crop. 



Area 
(acres). 



Unit of 
yield. 



Yields. 



TotaL 



Average 
per acre. 



Values. 



Pertmlt 
of yield. 



TotaL 



Per acre. 



Bariey 

Beans 

BeetSfSogar 

Com. 

Com, ensilage 

Cora, fodder 

Fruits, small 

Garden 

Hay, other than aUUlii 

Hops , 

uJcm 

Oats 

Pasture ^., 

Peaches 

Pears 

Prunes.. 

Potatoes. 

Vetch seed 

Wheat 

Less duplicated areas 

Total cropped acreage, 



Irrlnted, no crop: 

Young orchard. 

Young aUal&t 

House and oonal area. . . 

Townsitearea 

Irrigated without crop. . 
Less duplicated areas. . . 

Total irrigated 



36,516 
10,684 

647 
1,371 
4,074 
6,301 

786 

889 

286 
1,299 
1,676 

121 
96 

130 
4,067 

811 
1,628 

276 
3»651 

130 
8,639 
8,163 
70,466 



432 
8,082 
2,776 
1,960 
7,677 
1,631 



84,660 



Ton..... 
Pound.. 
Bushel.. 

...do 

Ton 

Bushel.. 

Ton 

...do 

Acre.... 

...do 

Ton 

Pound.. 
Acre.... 
Bushel.. 
Acre.... 
Pound.. 

...do 

...do 

Bushel.. 
Pound.. 
Bushel.. 



167,020 
84,039,060 
16,440 
21,936 
20,370 
316,060 
8,646 
4,446 



4.8 
8,200 
28 
16 

6 
60 
11 

6 



122.00 
.08 
1.60 
8.60 
10.00 
1.40 
9.00 
6.00 



4,726 
208,800 



8 

1,726 



6,200, 



40 



22.00 

.12 

200.00 

LOO 



I 1,686,620 ' 

11,960,600 

8,266,130 

I 748^684 

44,800 

I 72,780 i 



1,808 

7,840 

11,841 

211 

344 

20 



.04 
.036 
.046 
.80 
.16 
XOO 



13,464,440 

1,021,172 

23,160 

78,970 

203,700 

441,070 

77,814 

26,670 

67,200 

194,850 

108,960 

25,056 

19,600 

6,200 

101,675 

61,426 

419,318 

146,526 

598,868 

7.168 

146.660 



104.60 

96.00 

42.00 

57.60 

50.00 

70.00 

09.00 

30.00 

200.00 

150.00 

66.00 

207.00 

200.00 

40.00 

25.00 

75.70 

274.40 

532.80 

168.60 

65.00 

40.00 



Total and aTerage. 



7,213,392 



102.36 



Areas. 



Total irrigable area farms reported . . 
Total irrigated area farms reported . . 

Under water right applications. 

Under rental oontracM 

Totaleropped ana farms reported. . . 



Acres, 



84,660 
84,660 
28,860 
65,800 
70,466 



Number 
of fams. 



2,780 
2,780 
960 
1,820 
2,78^ 



Percent 

of 
project. 



76.38 
76.88 
26.08 
6a 36 
68.58 



TIETOH UiriT, 
coNSTBironoN DUBnro viboal ybab. 

All construction work during the year was done under supple- 
mental construction in accordance with the terms of a contract with 
the Tieton irrigation district dated August 7, 1918. 

Caruil enlargement. — ^The program of enlargement on the Tieton 
Canal, which was begun in 1916 and continued in 1917, was com- 
pleted in the fall of 1918. The work consisted of raising the sides of 
the semicircular section 1 foot and replacing the origmal concrete 
crossbars with steel bar or channel crossties spaced from 4 to feet. 
The capacity of the section was thereby increased from 300 second- 
feet to about 350 second-feet. The work was done by Government 
forces during the months of August to December, inclusive, and cov- 
ered 254 sta^ons, involving the placing of 874 cubic yards of concrete. 

In connection with the enlargement of the open channel, a revised 
transition 52 feet in length was constructea at the entrance to 
Columnar Tunnel for the purpose of bringing the tunnel capacity 
up to that of the open section. 

PatnA house. — A patrol site was secured on the upper end of the 
Ahtanum Ridge near the di\rersion point for lateral S, and a new 



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352 EIGHTEENTH ANKTTAL BEPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 

Tionse was erected thereon during tlie winter months. A permanent 
location in this section affords better regulation under this latent 
and attracts a more stable class of employees, thus resulting in im- 
proved service to the water users. 

Cowiehe diversion, — ^For the purpose of obtaining a supplemental 
flow of water, a diversion dam and a short canal were constructed for 
diverting 25 second-feet from the South Fork of the Cowiehe Creek. 
The work was done with Government forces during the months of 
February and March. 

OPERATION AND MAINTENANOE. 

From July 1, 1918, to the close of the 1918 irrigation season water 
service imder the Tieton Canal was practically without interruption 
and the supply was adequate to meet the average irrigation needs. 
The increased delivery of about 15 second-feet, whicn was made 
available through the enlargement in the fall of 19 17, coupled with 
favorable weather conditions, did much to relieve the situation. In 
order to permit the concrete work on the canal enlargement to b^n 
as early as possible, the irrigation season was closed on September 27, 
at a time wnen the supply of stored water in Clear Creek and Bumping 
Lake Reservoirs was practically exhausted. 

For the irrigation season of 1919 a small quantity of water was first 
diverted from the South Fork of the Cowiehe CreeK on April 1. This 
diversion was made largely for the purpose of supplving the demand 
for cistern and spray water, which service was witnheld during the 
month of March, contrary to the usual custom, in order to avoid 
interruption in the spring maintenance work. Water was first 
turned into the canal on April 13, and by the end of the month the 
diversion was increased to the maximum capacity for the previous 
season of 305 second-feet. 

The present maximiun capacity of 330 second-feet at the two lower 
tunnels, where no change m the original transitions has yet been 
made, was reached early in May. The additional quantity of about 
25 second-feet obtained through the 1918 enlai^ment, together 
with that made available at the South Fork diversion, provioed an 
ample supply of water during the last half of the fiscal year for the 
irrigation of about 27,500 acres of land which were receiving water. 
This represents about 86 per cent of the irrigable land under the 
project. 

The plan of ddivery on the Tieton unit provides two definite rota- 
tion scnedules to smt the varying soil conditions. About 15^000 
acres of the more shallow soil, peciihar to the south half of the project, 
are served on a schedule of 7 days on and 7 days off, and the remainder 
on a schedule of 7 days on and 14 days on. The larger quantity 
of water available durmg the last half of the fiscal year permitted 
the normal deUvery to be increased, on the basis of a continuous flow, 
from 1 second-foot to 140 acres to 1 second-foot to 126 acres. 

The maintenance work was done, for the most part, during the 
rionirrigation season and consisted of cleaning of both weeds and silt 
from canals and laterals in order to carry the desired quantities of 
water, repairs to steel flumes on main laterals, repair and renewal of 
small wooden structures mostly on the sublateral system, maintenance 
of houses and grounds, and the upkeep of 131 miles of telephone line* 



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WASHINGTON, YAKIMA PROJECT. 



353 



The program of fall maintenance work contemplated only the clean- 
ing of tne main laterals and the renewal of some of the more important 
structures . Weather conditions were exceptionally favorable through- 
out the fall for performing all classes of such work, but at the close of 
the year the program was only about 75 per cent completed owing to 
the labor shortage and to the heavy aemand for teams. Conse- 

3uently there was a large amoxmt of important work remaining' to be 
one in the spring of 1919, in addition to the usual cleaning of the 
aublaterals and repair of small concrete pipe Unes and wooden flimaes. 

Histofioal review y Tieton unit, Yahma project. 



Item. 



Acreage for which service was prepared 

to supply water 

Acreage irrigated 

Miles of canal operated 

Water diverted (a-jre-feet) 

Water served to land (a'?re-feet) 

Per acre of land irrigated (acre-feet) 



1914 



34,000 
»,600 
335 
67,790 
43.099 
2.09 



1915 



34,000 
22,000 
335 
62,000 
40,376 
i.83 



1916 



1917 



30,000 
23,000 
335 
74,936 
49,412 
. 2.15 1 
I 



31,000 
25,400 
335 
80,377 
57,318 
2.26 



1918 



31,000 
26,400 
335 
90,280 
64,068 
2.43 



11919 



32,00(1 
27,500 

335 
98,000 
69,000 

2.6 



1 Estimated. 
SETTLEMENT AND DEVELOPMENT. 

Settlement on the Tieton unit has increased more rapidly during 
the past year than at any time in the last five years, due no doubt in 
large part to the relatively high prices received for farm products of 
all kinds. The increase of population on the farms from November, 
1917, to November, 1918, was 719, or approximately 33 per cent. 
The number of owners on farms has steadily increased during the 

{)ast five years from 486 to 820. The nimiber of tenants increased 
rom 414in 1914 to 500 in 1916, but since then has decreased to 
460 in 1918, and it is believed that sales made during the past spring 
will show a still further reduction in tenant farming, a thing very 
much to be desired. With the increase in percentage of farms oper- 
ated by owners there is noticeable improvement in farm methods and 
in general crop results. 

In the new town of Tieton, at the terminus of the Cowiche branch 
of the Northern Pacific railroad, many improvements have been 
made, including store buildings and warehouses necessary to handle 
the rapidly growing trade of that vicinity. Other large warehouses 
have been built on this branch, also on branches of the i akima Valley 
Transportation Co. which tap the Nob Hill and Wide Hollow districts 
west of Yakima. 

Many new homes, farm building, silos, etc., are in evidence. It 
has been impossible for road building to keep pace with the demands 
but many road improvements have been made and others are planned 
for the near future. It is interesting to note that the reported value 
of automobiles on the project December 31, 1918, is in excess of the 
total value of all other fartn equipment on the project at that date. 
138554—19 ^23 



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854 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVICE. 
Settlement DiUa^ Tieton unit, Yakima project. 



Item. 



1915 



1916 



1917 



1918 



1919 



Total number of f aims 

Population 

Number of irrigated farms 
Population 

Number of towns, etc 

Population 

Total population 

Number of public schools. 

Number of churches 



1,200 
2,100 
1,200 
2,100 

19,000 

21,100 

10 

3 



1,300 

2,250 

1,300 

2,250 

7 

20,000 

22,250 

10 



1,400 

2,150 

1.400 

2.150 

7 

20,500 

22,650 

10 



1,400 

2,150 

1,400 

2,150 

7 

21,850 

24,000 

10 

3 



1,48D 

2,850 

1,400 

2,850 

8 

23,000 

25,860 

10 

3 



PRINCIPAL CROPS. 

The principal crops grown are hay, fruits, grain, vegetables, hops, 
and sugar beets, AlfSfa, which covers nearly 50 per cent of the 
lands under the project, continues to be the largest crop in point of 
acreage. The average yield of 3.3 tons per acre was slightly above 
the average. For the first time in the history of the project the 
apple crop returned a larger gross value to the grower tnan alfalfa 
hay; andiruits, as a whole, brought 41 per cent of the total return. 
There is a substantial increase in the acreage sowed to grain, espe- 
cially wheat, the yields being about the average. Com and potatoes 
ahow a decline in area of 50 and 75 per cent, respectively, since 1914, 
with slight increases in yield. The acreage in su^ar beets and beans 
was less than in 1917, being about 1 per cent eacn, of the ^oss area 
cropped, but the total tonnage was greater, owing to the increased 
yields per acre. 

Market conditions were better and the yields per acre higher for 
all crops, with the possible exception of small grain, than for any 
previous season. The average return per acre was $97.36, the aver- 
age farm return was nearly $2,000, and the total return of $2,516,251 
was more than double that for the season of 1916. The high price 
of hay, coupled with the large yield and good prices for all kinds of 
fruit, was in the main responsible for this large return. The maximum 
return per acre of $389.40 was realized on 25 acres of onions, 88 acres 
of smaD fruit coming second at $296.20 per acre. 

The high price received for all farm products, including live stock, 
resulted in a greater d^ee of general prosperity than has ever 
existed on the project. In spite of the cold, backward spring, pros- 
pects on June 30 for satisfactory crops and prices are even better 
than a year ago. 



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WASHINGTON, YAKIMA PROJECT. 355 

Crop reporty Tidon wntt, Yakima project^ Waskington, year of 1918. 



Crc^. 



Alfalfa 

Apples 

Barley 

Beans 

Beets, sugar 

Clover hay 

Com. 

Com, ensilage 

Com, fodder 

Fruits, small 

Garden 

Hay, except above — 

Hops 

Cafe 

Onions 

Pasture 

Peaches 

Pears 

Popcom 

Potatoes 

Wheat 

Less duplicated areas. 



Area 
(acres). 



Total cropped acreage. 



Irriflited, no crop: 

Young orchard 

Young alfaKa 

Irrigated without crop. 
Building sites and mis- 
cellaneous 

Less duplicated areas. . 

Total irrigated asreage 



12,218 

«,600 

886 

067 

235 

216 

728 

200 

170 

88 

210 

277 

306 

306 

25 

1,082 

448 

1,276 

31 

1,060 

4,681 

5,865 



Unit of 
YickL 



26,845 



746 

1,150 

40 

280 
1,660 



Ton 

Pound.. 
Bushel.... 

...do 

Ton. 

...do 

Bushel.... 

Ton- 

...do 

Pound.... 

Acre 

Ton 

Pound 

Bushel 

..do.;.... 

Acre 

Pound 

..do 

..do 

Bushel.... 
..do 



Yields. 



Total. 



40,862 

33,339,150 

21,500 

13,182 

2,250 

370 

81,274 

3,112 

949 

260,270 

210 

406 

370,000 

10,624 

4,980 

1,082 

2,580,100 

4,433,060 

62,000 

195,866 

99,490 




Values. 



Total. ! Per acre. 



_i_ 



$817,240 
833,480 
26,875 
47,455 
22,500 

9,250 
43,784 
28,008 

4,745 
26,067 
26,250 

8,120 
44,400 

8,499 

9.060 
27,050 
70,951 
99,744 

6,200 
156,693 
198.980 



166.90 

126.30 
30. 3» 
7M5i 
95.75- 
42.80' 
60.15^ 

14<K05i 
27.90 

296.20 

125.00 
29.30 

145. 10 
27.75 

398.40 
25.00 

158. 40 
78.15 

200.00 

147.80 
42.50 



Total and atwage i 2,516,251 ' 97.36 



1 




Total Irrigable a^ea f irms reported . . 
Total imgated area farms reported. 

Under water right applications . 

Under rental contracts 

Total cropped area farms reported. . 



26,400 



30,285 
26,400 I 
26,040 
360 
25,845 I 



1,280 
1,280 
1,262 
IS 
1,280 



Percent 

of 
project. 



96.9 
84.5 
8i.3 
1.2 
82.7 



PROPOSED NEW TTNTTS. 

During the year investigations have been conducted in connection 
with proposed additional units of the Yakima project, as follows: 

Kittitas unit J lying in Kittitas County and in the vicinitv of EUens- 
buTjg, comprising 70,000 acres. Some office work was dfone in the 
revision of estimates on this unit, but no field work was undertaken. 

Moxee unitj comprising about 40,000 acres, all In Yakima County 
and lying above present canals in the Wenas, East Selah, and Moxee 
Valleys. On this unit all section lines were run and topography 
taken over the entire area. Section plats have been completed witn 
a 5-foot contour interval and 400 feet = 1 inch scale. Final location 
of about 15 miles of the main canal had been made at the close of the 
year. 

Roza unitj consisting of about 60,000 acres in Yakima and Benton 
Counties and lying jpnncipally above -the Sunnyside Canal. Topog- 
raphy has been taken over about 70 per cent of the area, but no 
location lines made in the field. 

Kennewick unit covers about 35,000 acres in Benton County south 
of the Yakima River and Oregon- Washington Railroad & Navigation 
Co. in the vicinity of Kennewick and Kiona. Topography has been 
taken over about 50 per cent of the area. The plans for this unit 



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356 EIGHTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT OF RECLAMATION SERVIOE. 

contemplate picking up return flow at the Prosser Dam, diverting 
through a power canal on the left bank of the Yakima River for a 
distance of about 10^ miles, where a part of the water is dropped 
back to the river, and generating power for pumping the balance 
across the river to a higher elevation, where it is carried by canal to 
the lands in the vicinity of Kiona and Kennewick. 



BOARD ICBSTINaS. 



Dat«. 



Jan. 8, 1919.. 
Mar. 5, 1919. 



Subject. 



Additional units to Yakima proj- 
ect. 
do 



Personnel. 



D. C. Henny, R. F. Walter, R. K. Tiffany, 

C. E. Crownover. 
D. C. Henny, R. F. Walter, James Munn, R. 

K. Tiffany, C. E. Crownover. 



FTJBLIC NOTICE AND OBDEBS. 
SUNNYSIDE UNrr. 

PUBUC NOTICE, MABCR 11, 1919. 

1. In pursuance of section 4 of the reclamation act of June 17, 1902 
(32 Stat., 388), and of acts amendatory thereof or supplementary 
thereto, particularly the reclamation extension act of August 13, 1914 
(38 Stat., 686), announcement is hereby made that the annual opera- 
tion and maintenance charges for the irrigation season of 1919 and 
thereafter until further notice against all lands of the Sunnyside unit, 
Yakima project, Washington, under public notice, shall be as herein- 
after stated. 

2. Classiflcation of lands. — For the purpose of equitably determin- 
ing the operation and maintenance charges, the lands of the Sunny- 
side unit nave been divided by the Sunnyside Valley irrigation district 
into three classes^ according to water rec^uirements, viz. A, B, and C, 
and a map showing such dassification is on file in the office of the 
project manager, and in the office of the irrigation district. 

3. Operation and maintenance charges. — ^Each acre of irrigable land, 
whether water is used thereon or not, shall be charged with a minimum 
operation and maintenance charge of $2, which will permit delivery 
of not more than the following amounts per irrigable acre: To lancfa 
of class A, 2 acre-feet; to lands of class B, 2i acre-feet; to lands 
of class C, 3 acre-feet. For additional water above the foregoing 
amounts, the rate shall be 50 cents per acre-foot: Provided, That for 
newly reclaimed lands no charge will be made for water actually 
needed in excess of the amount covered by a charge of $2 per irrigable 
acre at the said rates. 

4. Time of payment. — ^All operation and maintenance charges are 
due and payable annually on March 1 following the irrigation season : 
but where water-right application is made for public land enterea 
under the reclamation law after June 15 in any year, or where water- 
right application is made after August 1 in any year for land in pri- 
vate ownership, no operation and maintenance charge will be made 
for water delivered during the remainder of the irrigation season in 
which the water-right application is made. 

S. G. Hopkins, 
Assistant Secretary of the Interior. 



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WASHINGTON, YAKIMA PROJECT. 357 

TIETON UNIT. 

PUBLIG NOTICE, NOVEMBER 15, 1918. 

1. Limitation of irrigable area. — In pursuance of section 4 of the 
reclamation act of June 17, 1902 (32 Stat., 388), and acts amendatory 
thereof or supplementary thereto, particularly the reclamation exten- 
sion act of August 13, 1914 (38 Stat., 686), ana also in accordance with 
the contract between the Tieton Water Users* Association and the 
United States, dated July 16, 1918, and the contract between the 
United States and the Yakima-Tieton irrigation district, dated July 
18, 1918, public notice is hereby gjiven that the area of the Tieton 
unit, Yakima project, Washington, is limited to 32,000 acres of irriga- 
ble land, designated on approved farm unit plats of the following 
described townships, as now m eflFect, to wit: Tps. 12, 13, 14, and 15 N. 
R. 16 E., Willamette meridian; Tps. 12, 13, and 14 N., R. 17 E., Willa- 
mette meridian; Tps. 12, 13, and 14 N., R. 17 E., Willamette meridian. 
All lands not now shown on said farm unit plats are excluded from 
the Tieton imit. Copies of said plats are on file in the office of the 

i)roiect manager. United States Reclamation Service, and in the local 
and office, boUi at Yakima, Wash. 

2. Water charges. — The water charges for said 32,000 acres of land 
shall be subject not only to public notices heretofore and hereafter 
issued pursuant to the reclamation law, but shall include also the 
supplemental construction charges, authorized by the irrigation dis- 
trict election of July 6, 1918, and payable by the district lands, pur- 
suant to said contract with the Yalcima-Tieton irrigation district: 
Provided, That in computing construction charges on any tract, and 
determining the 5 per cent increase of charges required by section 9 
of said reclamation extension act there shall be eliminated any period 
during which water-right applications were not receivable by the 
United States for such tract. 

E. C. Bradley, 
Assistant to the Secretary of the Interior, 

PUBLIC NOnCB, HABCH 11, 1919. 

1. Annual operation and maintenance charges. — In pursuance of 
section 4 of the reclamation act of June 17, 1902 (32 Stat., 388), and 
of acts amendatory thereof or supplementary thereto, particularly 
the reclamation extension act of August 13, 1914 (38 Stat., 686), 
announcement is hereby made that the annual operation and main- 
tenance charges for the irrigation season of 1910 and thereafter until 
further notice against all lands of the Tieton unit, Yakima project, 
Washington, xmder public notice, will be as follows: For all water 
delivered between June 1 and August 31, inclusive, a charge of $1 

5 er acre-foot will be made; and for all water delivered at other times 
uring the irrigation season a charge of 60 cents per acre-foot will be 
made: Providm, That a minimum charge of $1.25 per irrigable acre 
will be made whether water is used or not, which minimum amount 
when paid will be credited upon the account for water delivered at 
the above acre-foot rates. AH operation and maintenance charges 
are due and payable annually on March 1 following the irrigation 
season; but where water-right application is made for public land 
entered under the reclamation law after June 15 in any year, or where 
w